NCSSM Course Catalog
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  • AR4100 Drawing
  • AR4110 Painting
  • AR4310 Digital Photography
  • AR4320 Art and Technology
  • AR4330 Art, Philosophy, and the Creative Habit
  • AR4500 Advanced Drawing
  • AR4510 Advanced Painting
  • AR4520 Advanced Studio Art
  • AS4051 American Studies I
  • AS4052 American Studies II
  • BI3560 Sports Kinesiology
  • BI3580 Classical Genetics (*M*)
  • BI3640 Developmental Biology (*R*)
  • BI3700 Evolution
  • BI3900 Res Exp-Biology (*R*)
  • BI4010 Anatomy & Physiology
  • BI4020 Ecology (*R*)
  • BI4030 Environmental Science (*R*)
  • BI4040 Climate Change Biology (*M*)
  • BI4110 Molecular Genetics (*R*)
  • BI4120 Population Genetics (*M*)
  • BI4130 Aquatic Ecology (*R*)
  • BI4140 Molecular & Cellular Biol
  • BI4160 Neuroscience (*R*)
  • BI4200 Immunology (*R*)
  • BI4210 AP Biology (I) (*R*)
  • BI4211 AP Biology (II) (*R*)
  • BI4920 Research in Biology I (*R*)
  • BI4921 Research in Biology II (*R*)
  • BI4922 Research in Biology III (*R*)
  • CH3125 Computational Chemistry (*R*)
  • CH3500 Chemistry Core I - Atoms & Molecules
  • CH3900 Research Experience in Chemistry (*R*)
  • CH4000 Chemistry Core II - Reactions & Energy
  • CH4020 AP Chemistry (I): Atoms & Molecules (*M*)
  • CH4120 AP Chemistry (II): Kinetics & Energy
  • CH4130 Organic Chemistry
  • CH4140 Environmental Chem (*R*)
  • CH4150 Polymer Chemistry
  • CH4170/PH4170 Electrochemistry: Batteries, Fuel Cells and Solar Cells
  • CH4170/PH4170 Electrochemistry: Batteries, Fuel Cells and Solar Cells
  • CH4210 Introduction to Applied Chemistry and Engineering
  • CH4270 Analytical Chemistry
  • CH4280 Materials Chemistry
  • CH4290 Biochemistry (*R*)
  • CH4910 Research Computational Sci I
  • CH4910 Research Computational Sci I
  • CH4911 Research Computational Sci II
  • CH4920 Research Chem I (*R*)
  • CH4921 Research Chem II (*R*)
  • CH4922 Research Chem III (*R*)
  • CN3051 Journeys into Chinese I
  • CN3052 Journeys into Chinese II
  • CN3651 Navigating in Chinese + Global Understanding I
  • CN3652 Navigating in Chinese + Global Understanding II
  • CN4051 Advanced Chinese I
  • CN4052 Advanced Chinese II
  • CN4161 Navigating in Chinese + Global Understanding II
  • CN4162 Navigating in Chinese + Global Understanding I
  • CN4250 Chinese for Heritage Speakers
  • CN4351 Explorations of Chinese I
  • CN4351 Explorations of Chinese I
  • CN4352 Explorations in Chinese II
  • CN4500 Chinese for Heritage Speakers
  • CN4651 Readings in Chinese with Topics I
  • CN4652 Readings in Chinese with Topics
  • CN4851 AP Chinese Language and Culture I
  • CN4852 AP Chinese Language and Culture II
  • CN4951 Advanced Readings in Chinese with Topics I
  • CN4952 Advanced Readings in Chinese with Topics II
  • CS4020 Web Development
  • CS4040 Game Design and Simulation
  • CS4070/AR4070 Art, Technology, and Computing
  • CS4110/EE4110 Introductory Robotics
  • CS4110/EE4110 Introductory Robotics
  • CS4120 Computing for Everyone
  • CS4200/MA4200 Cryptography
  • CS4200/MA4200 Cryptography
  • CS4230 Networks and the Web
  • CS4270 Fundamentals of Object-Oriented Design
  • CS4320 Machine Learning
  • CS4330 Server-Side Development
  • CS4350 Data Structures and Algorithms
  • CS4380 Algorithms
  • CS4400/EE4400: Robotics Design for Competition
  • CS4400/EE4400: Robotics Design for Competition
  • CS4900 Advanced Computer Science Topics
  • CS4920 Advanced Computer Science Topics
  • DR4101 Theater Performance Workshop: Scene Study and Choice
  • DR4102 Theater Performance Workshop: Unacting and Movement
  • EE3080 History of Engin'g & Tech
  • EE3100 CAD/CAM
  • EE3620 Engineering the Modern
  • EE3900 Research Experience in Engineering and Computer Science
  • EE4000 Mechanical Engineering
  • EE4020 Electrical Engineering
  • EE4040 Architecture
  • EE4080 Biomedical Engineering
  • EE4100 Introductory Robotics
  • EE4140 Aerospace Engineering
  • EE4145 Rocketry Design for Competition
  • EE4160 Civil Engineering
  • EE4180 Environmental Engineering
  • EE4200 Digital Agriculture and Engineering
  • EE4300 Topics In Engineering - Robotics Design
  • EE4520 Biomedical Instrumentation
  • EE4540 Statics
  • EE4560 Circuits
  • EN4200 African Studies: Pre-colonial Africa
  • EN4210 African Studies: Modern Africa
  • EN4211 East Asian Studies I
  • EN4212 East Asian Studies II
  • EN4215 Asian American Studies
  • EN4220 African Studies: North Africa and the Middle East
  • EN4231 Latin American Studies I
  • EN4232 Latin American Studies II
  • EN4233 Latin American Studies III
  • EN4234 Latin American Literature and Culture
  • EN4241 Western European Cultural Studies I
  • EN4242 Western European Cultural Studies II
  • EN4251 Western Civilizations I: Wisdom, Revelation, Reason, and Doubt
  • EN4252 Western Civilizations II: Wisdom, Revelation, Reason, and Doubt
  • EN4300 Creative Writing
  • EN4310 Contemporary African-American Literature
  • EN4320 Women's Literature across the Globe
  • EN4330: Ecocriticism
  • EN4400 AI in Science Fiction
  • EN4410 British Literature and Culture
  • EN4420 Classical Myth: Epic and Tragedy
  • EN4430 Modern World Fiction
  • EN4440 Philosophy and Literature in the Twentieth Century
  • EN4450 Shakespeare Now
  • EN4460 Southern Studies
  • EN4470 STEM and the Stage
  • EN4481 Topics in Literature I
  • EN4482 Topics in Literature II
  • EN4483 Topics in Literature III
  • EN4484 Topics in Literature IV
  • EN4600 Research Experience in the Humanities
  • EN4610 Research in the Humanities
  • FR3051 Journeys into French I
  • FR3052 Journeys into French II
  • FR3651 Navigating in French I
  • FR3652 Navigating in French II
  • FR4051 Advanced French for Global Applications
  • FR4052 Advanced French for Global Applications II
  • FR4151 Navigating in French I
  • FR4152 Navigating in French II
  • FR4300 Advanced French for Global Applications
  • FR4510 Modern French Readings and Media
  • FR4651 Modern French Readings and Media I
  • FR4652 Modern French Readings and Media
  • HU4300 Whose America? Immigrant Experiences, 1910-present
  • HU4400 Black Studies
  • HU4405 American Indian and Indigenous Studies
  • HU4410 Critical Race Theory
  • HU4411 Critical Legal Studies
  • HU4420 Digital Humanities
  • HU4430 Ethics of AI
  • HU4440 Film Studies
  • HU4445 Introduction to Western Thought
  • HU4450 Race, Leadership, and Ethics
  • HU4460 Topics in Humanities I
  • HU4461 Topics in Humanities II
  • HU4470 Topics in the Study of Religion
  • HU4480 Topics in American Studies: Asian American Studies
  • HU4490 Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
  • JA3051 Journeys into Japanese I
  • JA3052 Journeys into Japanese II
  • JA3651 Navigating in Japanese I
  • JA3652 Navigating in Japanese II
  • JA4151 Navigating in Japanese I
  • JA4152 Navigating in Japanese II
  • LA3051 Latin Elements I
  • LA3052 Latin Elements II
  • LA3650 Latin Boot Camp
  • LA4050 Caesar in Gaul and Britannia
  • LA4651 Sallust and Cicero I
  • LA4652 Sallust and Cicero II
  • LA4661 Ovid's Metamorphoses I
  • LA4662 Ovid's Metamorphoses II
  • MA1000 Precalculus Co-Requisite
  • MA1012 Calculus Ib Exam Prep
  • MA1030 Calculus Co-Requisite
  • MA1044 Calculus II Exam Prep
  • MA3550 Modeling with Matrices
  • MA3990 Precalculus I
  • MA3992 Precalculus II
  • MA4000 Precalculus & Modeling w/ Advanced Topics I
  • MA4002 Precalculus & Modeling w/ Advanced Topics II
  • MA4010 Biocalculus
  • MA4012 Calculus Ia
  • MA4014 Calculus Ib with AP Exam Prep
  • MA4016 Calculus Ib
  • MA4042 Calculus I
  • MA4044 Calculus II with AP Exam Prep
  • MA4046 Calculus II
  • MA4050 Modeling with Differential Equations
  • MA4060 Multivariable Calculus
  • MA4100 AP Statistics w/ Advanced Topics I
  • MA4102 AP Statistics w/ Advanced Topics II
  • MA4110 Foundations of Data Science
  • MA4112 Advanced Data Science
  • MA4200/CS4200 Cryptography
  • MA4210 Topics in Civic Mathematics
  • MA4220 Mathematical Modeling
  • MA4230 Complex Systems and Modern Networks
  • MA4240 Numerical Analysis
  • MA4300 Combinatorics and Game Theory
  • MA4302 Advanced Combinatorics
  • MA4310 Topics in Theoretical Mathematics
  • MA4320 Linear Algebra with Applications
  • MA4500 Graph Theory with REX Math
  • MA4510 Research in Mathematics
  • MA4512 Research in Mathematics II
  • MA4520 Advanced Mathematical Topics I
  • MA4522 Advanced Mathematical Topics II
  • MR3080 Mentorship: Foundations in Research
  • MR4050 Mentorship: Senior Research I
  • MR4051 Mentorship: Senior Research II
  • MU3500 Classical Piano and Guitar
  • MU3501 Piano and Guitar
  • MU3501 Piano and Guitar
  • MU4100 Chorale
  • MU4110 Wind Ensemble
  • MU4120 Jazz Performance Workshop
  • MU4130 Orchestra
  • MU4170 Topics in Music Performance III: Solo Repertoire and Performance (Vocal)
  • MU4300 Music Theory and Composition
  • MU4305 Fundamentals of Music Theory
  • MU4310 AP Music Theory
  • MU4400 History of Western Music
  • PA1000 Racquet Sports I
  • PA1001 Racquet Sports II
  • PA1002 Outdoor Recreation
  • PA1003 Disc Sports
  • PA1004 Archery
  • PA1005 Weight Trng/Sprts & Fitness
  • PA1006 Team Sports
  • PA1007 Pilates & Yoga
  • PA1008 Self Defense
  • PA1009 Hiking
  • PA1010 Introduction to Fitness
  • PA1020 Fit for Life
  • PH3040 Astronomy
  • PH3500 Physics Core: Mechanics
  • PH3900 Research Experience in Physics (*R*)
  • PH3920 Waves, Sound, and Optics
  • PH4000 Physics Core: E&M
  • PH4020 Physics Core: Mechanics (Math Intensive) (*M*)
  • PH4120 Physics Core: E&M (Math Intensive) (*M*)
  • PH4130 Computational Physics *R*
  • PH4150/EE4150 Elements of Satellite Design
  • PH4150/EE4150 Elements of Satellite Design
  • PH4180 Astrophysics
  • PH4190 Biophysics
  • PH4220 Advanced Physics Problem Solving
  • PH4240 AP Physics C: Mechanics
  • PH4241 AP Physics C: E&M
  • PH4250 Modern Physics
  • PH4260 Quantum Mechanics
  • PH4920 Research in Physics I (*R*)
  • PH4921 Research in Physics II (*R*)
  • PH4922 Research in Physics III (*R*)
  • RE1002 Cornerstone
  • RE1010 Exploring MultiCultural Amer
  • RE1012 Public Speaking
  • RE1016 Marketing You
  • RE1018 Excellence in Leadership
  • RE1020 Financial Planning
  • RE1022 College and Career Planning
  • SE4001 Emergency Care
  • SE4002 Introduction to Sports Injury Care and Management
  • SL1000 Service Learning
  • SP3051 Journeys into Spanish I
  • SP3052 Journeys in Spanish II
  • SP3250 Breakthroughs in Spanish
  • SP3651 Navigating in Spanish I
  • SP3652 Navigating in Spanish II
  • SP3850 Explorations in Spanish with Topics
  • SP4051 Advanced Spanish for Global Applications I
  • SP4052 Advanced Spanish for Global Applications II
  • SP4151 Navigating in Spanish I
  • SP4152 Navigating in Spanish II
  • SP4250 Spanish for Heritage Speakers
  • SP4251 Topics in Advanced Spanish I: Sports and Culture in the Hispanosphere
  • SP4252 Topics in Advanced Spanish II
  • SP4252 Topics in Advanced Spanish II: Afro-Spanish Caribbeans and their Contributions
  • SP4253 Topics in Advanced Spanish III
  • SP4253 Topics in Advanced Spanish III
  • SP4300 Explorations in Spanish: Environmental Studies
  • SP4310 Explorations in Spanish: Medical Spanish
  • SP4500 Spanish for Heritage Speakers
  • SP4510 Advanced Spanish: Gender and Sexuality in the Hispanosphere
  • SP4520 Advanced Spanish: Sports and Culture in the Hispanosphere
  • SP4530 Advanced Spanish: The Gothic and Supernatural in the Hispanosphere
  • SP4540 Advanced Spanish: Afro-Latino and Caribbean Studies
  • SP4651 Readings in Spanish with Topics
  • SP4652 Advanced Readings in Spanish with Topics
  • SP4851 Advanced Readings in Spanish with Topics I
  • SP4852 Advanced Readings in Spanish with Topics II
  • VS1014 Men's Basketball
  • VS1016 Women's Basketball
  • VS1018 Men's Swimming
  • VS1020 Women's Swimming
  •      AR4100

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Art
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One elective credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: Additional elective
    Meeting Times: Three periods and a lab OR two 100-min. evening periods

    AR4100 Drawing

    Drawing is the foundation of all art studio practices and is highly recommended as a prerequisite for all other art courses. A creative mind is increasingly sought out in every professional career track as art elements and design concepts are interdisciplinary. This course is taught to nurture creative and critical thinking, increase visual communication skills, and reacquaint the student with the "artist within." No experience is necessary! All students receive individual feedback from the instructor and further engage with classmates during studio time and the critiquing process. Through traditional drawing exercises with pencil, charcoal, and ink, students gain creative applications to better interpret reality and respond to their aesthetic values. In addition to in-class drawing assignments, all students are given a sketchbook to heighten their observation skills while building a visual vocabulary and further documenting their time at NCSSM. Repeatable for credit.

  •      AR4110

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Art
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One elective credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: Additional elective
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week and a lab OR two 90 min lab periods

    AR4110 Painting

    This course is an introduction to basic painting, although all levels of experience are welcome. The primary goal of this course is to develop students' painting skills through constant exploration of visual perception. Assignments address the use of both acrylic and oil paint to create dynamic compositions that incorporate elements such as depth of field, line, texture, linear perspective, and illusion – while students gain knowledge to better understand light and the interaction of color. Students enhance their levels of perception as they learn color theory. No grade can compete with the gift that comes from intuitive color mixing. Through assignments and presentations by the instructor, students gain knowledge, inspiration, and appreciation for art history and from artists working today. All students receive individual feedback from the instructor and further engage with classmates during studio time and the critiquing process. Repeatable for credit.

  •      AR4310

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Art
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One elective credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: Additional elective
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week OR two 100-min. evening periods

    AR4310 Digital Photography

    This course introduces students to the concepts and techniques necessary to create, edit, and print color photographic images using digital technology. Units on composition, color theory, image-editing, printing options, and digital image storage are also covered. Students focus on personal exploration using technology as a creative medium for visual expression. Students are expected to respect photography equipment, the art studio, and develop a healthy studio practice. Repeatable for credit.

  •      AR4320

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Art
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One elective credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: Additional elective
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week and a lab OR two 90 min lab periods

    AR4320 Art and Technology

    This studio art course asks students to expand on their definition of art to include technology as a platform for creativity. Students will be introduced to the resources in NCSSM's FabLab and our new Creative Technology Lab, which houses a Virtual Reality Painting Studio, and to a variety of other digital applications and equipment. Students will have the time to develop their skills on their choice of state-of-the-art equipment while bringing their creative ideas into existence. Although there is no prerequisite for this course, priority use of our Virtual Reality Painting Studio will be given to students who have already taken AR4100 Drawing. The goal of this course is to develop and expand on creative skills and construct an innovative work of art. Through slide presentations, readings and class discussions, students will gain knowledge and appreciation of art history while becoming more familiar with artists who are working with groundbreaking methods and materials. Repeatable for credit.

  •      AR4330

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Art
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One elective credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week and a lab

    AR4330 Art, Philosophy, and the Creative Habit

    Are you ready to embark on an exhilarating journey that will push the boundaries of your creativity and philosophical thinking? This course explores the fascinating interplay between art, philosophy, and the creative process. Through engaging readings, dynamic discussions, and exciting hands-on projects, you will discover the incredible ways artistic expression and philosophical inquiry intertwine. This intro to philosophy and conceptual thinking course will unlock your creative potential as you explore Metaphysics, Epistemology, Ethics, and Aesthetics through thought-provoking activities that will help you better understand your unique aesthetic value system. You will be challenged to find a visual language to express your newfound knowledge by creating conceptual works of art.

  •      AR4500

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Art
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of previous NCSSM art course and permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One elective credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: Additional elective
    Meeting Times: One period per week AND two 100-min evening periods

    AR4500 Advanced Drawing

    This largely self-paced advanced art course allows students the opportunity to further develop skills and techniques acquired in AR4100 Drawing. Students are encouraged to take creative risks while building their art portfolios and expanding on their definitions of drawing. Emphasis is placed on creating more complex visual statements, increasing comprehension of conceptual content, and developing further technical competence. Students will create an independent body of work and demonstrate their ability to speak critically and professionally about their art. In addition to studio time, this course includes a sketchbook assignment, a written artist statement, and at least one formal critique. This course may be repeated for credit.

  •      AR4510

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Art
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of previous NCSSM art course and permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One elective credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: Additional elective
    Meeting Times: One period per week AND two 100-min evening periods

    AR4510 Advanced Painting

    This largely self-paced advanced art course allows students the opportunity to further develop skills and techniques acquired in AR4110 Painting. Students are encouraged to take creative risks while building their art portfolios and expanding on their definitions of drawing. Emphasis is placed on creating more complex visual statements, increasing comprehension of conceptual content, and developing further technical competence. Students will create an independent body of work and demonstrate their ability to speak critically and professionally about their art. In addition to studio time, this course includes a sketchbook assignment, a written artist statement, and at least one formal critique. This course may be repeated for credit.

  •      AR4520

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Art
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Recommendation of the art instructor and permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One elective credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: Additional elective
    Meeting Times: One period per week AND two 100-min evening periods

    AR4520 Advanced Studio Art

    This largely self-paced advanced art course allows students the opportunity to further develop skills and techniques acquired in AR4320. Students are encouraged to take creative risks while building their art portfolios and expanding on their definitions of drawing. Emphasis is placed on creating more complex visual statements, increasing comprehension of conceptual content, and developing further technical competence. Students will create an independent body of work and demonstrate their ability to speak critically and professionally about their art. In addition to studio time, this course includes a sketchbook assignment, a written artist statement, and at least one formal critique. This course may be repeated for credit.

  •      AS4051

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Credits: 2
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: Two American Studies credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    AS4051 American Studies I

    American Studies is the core humanities experience for all NCSSM juniors. In this course, the first in a required two-course sequence, students take an interdisciplinary, cultural-studies approach to the critical study of American history and literature—from Indigenous American nations before contact with Europeans to the period of Reconstruction. Students examine the continuing development of both collective and individual American identities through the study of history and historiography, literature and literary theory, politics, economics, law, material culture, the visual arts, film, music, and other aspects of American culture. A key feature of the curriculum is instruction and practice in close and critical reading, critical thinking, and academic writing—skills foundational to NCSSM's senior humanities courses and to future higher-level work across disciplines. Discussions, group and individual projects, and a variety of writing assignments invite students to recover, construct, interrogate, and interpret the past as narratives woven from many threads. Through collaborative inquiry and investigation, students encounter the past as a means of interrogating issues in our current world and as a path to becoming informed, empathetic, engaged, and ethical citizens in their local and global communities.

  •      AS4052

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Credits: 2
    Prerequisite(s): AS4051
    Corequisite(s): none
    Graduation Requirements Met: Two American Studies credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week

    AS4052 American Studies II

    American Studies is the core humanities experience for all NCSSM juniors. In this course, the second in a required two-course sequence, students take an interdisciplinary, cultural-studies approach to the critical study of American history and literature—from the period of Reconstruction to the present day. Students examine the continuing development of both collective and individual American identities through the study of history and historiography, literature and literary theory, politics, economics, law, material culture, the visual arts, film, music, and other aspects of American culture. A key feature of the curriculum is instruction and practice in close and critical reading, critical thinking, and academic writing—skills foundational to NCSSM's senior humanities courses and to future higher-level work across disciplines. Discussions, group and individual projects, and a variety of writing assignments invite students to recover, construct, interrogate, and interpret the past as narratives woven from many threads. Through collaborative inquiry and investigation, students encounter the past as a means of interrogating issues in our current world and as a path to becoming informed, empathetic, engaged, and ethical citizens in their local and global communities.

  •      BI3560

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Biology
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit OR One Biology credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    BI3560 Sports Kinesiology

    This course provides an in-depth study of the skeleton and muscular structure and function of the upper and lower extremity of the human body. Topics include origins, insertions, action and nerve innervation of muscles in the body, along with in-depth study of the skeletal upper and lower extremity, some discussion of the central nervous system, cranial nerves, spinal column, pelvic cavity, urinary systems along with the cardiovascular system. The laboratory component of this course takes place in the gym and weight room where students study their own bodies to learn about the function and action of the muscles, with hands-on palpation of other students. Students will visit the human cadaver lab at UNC.

  •      BI3580

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Biology
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Biology credit OR One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    BI3580 Classical Genetics (*M*)

    This course begins with the fundamentals of cell division (mitosis and meiosis) and focuses on modes of inheritance of traits, beginning with Mendel's pea plants and stressing extensions and exceptions to Mendel's principles. Laboratory activities with fruit flies, problem-solving, and critical thinking skills are emphasized. Students enrolling in this course should have strong mathematical and problem-solving skills.

  •      BI3640

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Biology
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Biology credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    BI3640 Developmental Biology (*R*)

    Building a viable multicellular organism from a single fertilized egg involves the coordination of many biological processes. This course studies the molecular and genetic mechanisms involved in embryogenesis with an emphasis on the processes that establish axis orientation of an embryo, specify the fate of stem cells, and regulate the formation of organ systems. Inherent in the field of developmental biology is the comparison of these processes across a variety of species in their evolutionary context. Emphasizing experimental design and technical writing, this course focuses on applying modern and canonical laboratory techniques using live animal models. This course includes a significant research component.

  •      BI3700

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Biology
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Biology credit OR One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    BI3700 Evolution

    In this course, students gain an appreciation for evolution as a process that is relevant to their everyday lives. Students learn to identify and quantify variation in populations and understand sources of variation. Basic evolutionary processes are studied including natural selection, mutation, drift, and migration. The course concludes with the study of speciation, phylogeny, and other selected topics. NOTE: Students may take either this course or BI4020 Population Genetics, but not both.

  •      BI3900

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Biology
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: January Term OR One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: January Term
    Meeting Times: Four week intensive January Term

    BI3900 Res Exp-Biology (*R*)

    This introductory course is for students who want to pursue a research opportunity in biology. Students will learn to design and conduct an experiment, analyze data, and present their findings. In addition, students read and discuss scientific literature. Students will work in small groups on a research project. Research questions may be selected from an area identified by the instructor (examples: microbiology, food science, neurobiology, entomology etc.), or from topics proposed by the student as appropriate. Students will write a final paper describing their research and make a formal oral and visual presentation of their findings. This course includes a significant research component.

  •      BI4010

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Biology
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit OR One Biology credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    BI4010 Anatomy & Physiology

    This course provides an in-depth study of the structure and function of the human body. The structure of the body systems, including integumentary, skeletal, muscular, cardiovascular, respiratory, endocrine, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems is put into context of how the body grows, maintains homeostasis, and responds in the disease-state. The laboratory component includes microscopic analysis and dissection of relevant animal models, as well as physiological concepts via experimentation.

  •      BI4020

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Biology
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Biology credit OR One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    BI4020 Ecology (*R*)

    In this course students study ecology at the level of the organism, population, community, and ecosystem. Special emphasis is given to quantifying population growth and interspecific interactions, including predator-prey, and competitive relationships. Labs are designed to expose students to working with live organisms, seeing ecological patterns in the field, and quantifying ecological variables. This course includes a significant research component.

  •      BI4030

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Biology
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit OR One Biology credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    BI4030 Environmental Science (*R*)

    This course focuses on the study of natural Earth processes in order to understand how these processes have grown interdependent over millennia to form a life-supporting and balanced Earth system. Due to the interdisciplinary nature of this course, the laboratory and field components include a variety of activities from analysis of existing data sets to experimental design. Many of the field trips and labs are off campus and outdoors. Topics will include: ecosystem processes, population ecology, climate change, and environmental risks and exposures. Students will be introduced to relevant analytical methods in spatial analysis and toxicology. This course could be used to self-study for the AP environmental science exam but is not an official AP course. This course includes a significant research component.

  •      BI4040

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Biology
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Biology credit OR One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    BI4040 Climate Change Biology (*M*)

    Climate change biology is the study of the impact of climate change on natural systems with emphasis on understanding the interactions between biological systems and the climate system. The goal of climate change biology is the development of management techniques designed to preserve natural systems. Students study past climate-biological systems interactions, currently observed changes, biological theory, and modeling in order to develop an understanding of possible mitigation and management approaches. Students enrolling in this course should have strong mathematical and problem-solving skills.

  •      BI4110

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Biology
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): Chemistry
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit OR One Biology credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    BI4110 Molecular Genetics (*R*)

    This course focuses on the Central Dogma of molecular biology. The Central Dogma is our framework for understanding how information that is coded in DNA is transcribed into RNA and ultimately translated into proteins. Beginning with Watson and Crick's double-helix model, the course focuses on DNA structure, replication, transcription and translation. Current topics in DNA technology, gene cloning and bioinformatics are discussed. The course transitions to topics involved in gene expression and gene regulation in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Critical thinking skills and thoughtful data interpretation are stressed. This course emphasizes laboratory activities and research projects. Students enrolling in this course should have strong mathematical and problem-solving skills.

  •      BI4120

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Biology
    Prerequisite(s): BI3580 Classical Genetics or BI4110Molecular Genetics
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Biology credit OR One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    BI4120 Population Genetics (*M*)

    In this course students learn about genetics at the population level and start the course by identifying and quantifying variation in populations. Evolutionary processes, such as natural selection, drift, mutation, migration, and non-random mating are studied alone and in all possible combinations. Students explore how natural selection produces adaptations at the morphological and molecular levels. The course concludes with a study of macro evolutionary patterns including speciation. In contrast to BI3700 Evolution, this course is faster-paced, places more emphasis on mathematical models, and requires more independent learning. Students enrolling in this course should have strong mathematical and problem-solving skills. NOTE: Students may take either this course or BI3700 Evolution, but not both.

  •      BI4130

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Biology
    Prerequisite(s): BI4020 Ecology OR BI4211 AP Biology II
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit OR One Biology credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    BI4130 Aquatic Ecology (*R*)

    Aquatic ecology is the study of abiotic and biotic factors that influence the structure and dynamics of aquatic ecosystems. It includes the chemical, physical, and biological characteristics of streams, lakes, estuaries, and intertidal zones. Special emphasis is placed on interactions between abiotic and biotic factors, energy flow in food webs, and the role of humans in altering aquatic ecosystems. Students learn about ongoing research in aquatic ecology and gain experience making field observations, designing experiments, and analyzing data to test hypotheses. Regular outdoor experiences, both on and off campus, expose students to a variety of aquatic ecosystems. This course includes a significant research component.

  •      BI4140

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Biology
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): Any prior high school chemistry or current enrollment in an NCSSM chemistry course
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Biology credit OR One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    BI4140 Molecular & Cellular Biol

    The first portion of this course examines biochemical principles and the structure and properties of lipids, proteins, and carbohydrates. Students then examine cellular structure and function common to most eukaryotic organisms. Students examine biological levels of organization (molecules, organelles, cells, tissues, organs, and organ systems) by exploring human diseases and drug therapies. Topics in the course include cellular components, membrane function, energetics, enzyme function, cellular aging, cellular communication, biological levels of organization, diseases, and the drug approval process. Laboratory activities are designed to develop critical thinking skills and thoughtful data interpretation.

  •      BI4160

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Biology
    Prerequisite(s): Completion, with a course grade of B- or higher in at least one course from either the Human Body or Cellular Biology course strands
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    BI4160 Neuroscience (*R*)

    The goal of this course is to provide an introduction to the biological basis of behavior at cellular, systems, and organismal levels. This course enables students to understand the physiological and anatomical mechanisms underlying complex behaviors such as sensory input, motor control, animals as model organisms for human behavior, auditory and visual perception, higher order processing, and memory. The course will provide an entry into how scientists attempt to understand the complexity of our human experience as sentient biological entities. This course emphasizes group work through a significant amount of independent project work. This course includes a significant research component.

  •      BI4200

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Biology
    Prerequisite(s): : Classical Genetics, or Development Biology , or Molecular Genetics, or Anatomy and Physiology, or Molecular and Cellular Biology, or AP Biology (I) with a grade of B- or higher or permission of the Dean of Science
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    BI4200 Immunology (*R*)

    This course extends the concepts of molecular and cellular biology to focus upon the mechanisms that compose the immune system. We begin with the general properties and development of immunity against infectious diseases such as flu and measles, as well as the recent emerging infectious diseases. Then we proceed to the generation of B-cell and T-cell responses, immune effector mechanisms, vaccination and allergy. Lastly, students will have an opportunity to further study advanced topics of their own choice. Examples of the advanced topics may include AIDS and other immunodeficiencies, cancer immunology, transplantation immunology, autoimmunity, leukocyte migration and inflammation, expression of immunoglobulin genes, etc. This course emphasizes analytical and critical thinking as well as independent project work. This course includes a significant research component.

  •      BI4210

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Biology
    Prerequisite(s): Any prior high school chemistry
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit OR One Biology credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    BI4210 AP Biology (I) (*R*)

    This course is the first semester of a two-term sequence that surveys most areas of biology and prepares students for the Advanced Placement Biology exam. AP Biology I focuses on cellular biology, including biomolecules, cellular energetics, signaling, and molecular genetics. The course has a strong laboratory emphasis, with a significant research component. Students who are planning to take the AP exam should also enroll in AP Biology II.

  •      BI4211

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Biology
    Prerequisite(s): BI4210 AP Biology (I) or permission of the Dean of Science.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    BI4211 AP Biology (II) (*R*)

    This course is the second semester of a two-term sequence that surveys most areas of biology and prepares students for the Advanced Placement Biology exam. AP Biology II covers organisms, populations, and ecosystems, with a focus on evolutionary processes. The course has a strong laboratory emphasis, with a significant research component.

  •      BI4920

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Biology
    Prerequisite(s): By application in the Fall of the Junior year.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: January Term
    Schedule Requirements Met: January Term
    Meeting Times: Two week intensive January Term

    BI4920 Research in Biology I (*R*)

    This is an advanced course for January Term junior students with the maturity, independence, and motivation necessary to conduct their own research project. Students learn the scientific method and experimental design before conducting a trial experiment on a small scale. Students then write a mini- literature review on the topic of interest to them. Throughout the term students read from the primary scientific literature and participate in discussion groups on current issues in biological research. 

    Students who are accepted and enrolled in Research in Biology are expected to complete the entire sequence of courses including participation in 3 weeks of summer research on campus. This entire sequence includes 2 weeks of January Term in your junior year, Spring semester of your junior year, summer (3 weeks of SRIP) between the junior and senior year and Fall semester of your senior year. 

    Students must have a grade of B or higher to continue the sequence and have no major conduct violations to participate in SRIP.

    Fall 
    Jan Term 
    Spring 
    Summer 
    Jr Year 
    JTerm I
    Spring 
    SRIP
    Sr Year
    Fall

  •      BI4921

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Biology
    Prerequisite(s): Students with Junior standing apply in the Fall for entry in RBio I taught during the 1st two weeks of Jan Term.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit OR One Biology credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Seven periods per week and three labs

    BI4921 Research in Biology II (*R*)

    This is an advanced course for second semester junior students. Students write a detailed research proposal and defend it to a panel of their peers. Students begin to learn techniques and to gather data for their experiments. Based on the outcomes of the term's work, students may be given an opportunity to participate in summer research programs on campus. 

    Students who are accepted and enrolled in Research in Biology are expected to complete the entire sequence of courses including participation in 3 weeks of summer research on campus.  This entire sequence includes 2 weeks of Jan Term in your junior year, Spring semester of your junior year, summer (3 weeks of SRIP) between the junior and senior year and Fall semester of your senior year. 

    Students must have a grade of B or higher to continue the sequence and have no major conduct violations to participate in SRIP.

    Fall 
    Jan Term 
    Spring 
    Summer 
    Jr Year 
    JTerm I
    Spring 
    SRIP
    Sr Year
    Fall

  •      BI4922

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Biology
    Prerequisite(s): Final grade of B or higher in Research in Biology II, or successful participation in a summer research program and permission of the Dean of Science.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Seven periods per week and three labs

    BI4922 Research in Biology III (*R*)

    Students continue work on their previous research to produce additional data and conduct statistical analysis, as needed. They may research extension questions based on their original work. Students write a formal research paper and prepare a formal presentation. Students are required to present their results at the NCSSM Research Symposium in the spring and are encouraged to present their research at the North Carolina Student Academy of Science competition and other competitions. This course includes a significant research component

  •      CH3125

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Chemistry
    Corequisite(s): None
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester

    CH3125 Computational Chemistry (*R*)

    This course is designed to teach students the technologies, techniques, and tools of computational science. The course will benefit students who are interested in any area of study that uses chemistry (including subjects such as environmental science, medicine, biology, materials science, nanotechnology, etc.). This is essentially a course in quantum chemistry, and is one of the most challenging courses in the sequence. NCSSM is one of the only high schools in the country that teaches a formal course in computational chemistry. This course is typically offered at the upper undergraduate/graduate at most universities, and requires a strong chemistry background and at least 12 to 14 hours/week of dedicated time. Recommended for fall, senior year. This course includes topics that satisfy the chemistry graduation requirement.

  •      CH3500

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Chemistry
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Chemistry credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    CH3500 Chemistry Core I - Atoms & Molecules

    This course provides a thorough introduction to chemical principles using a college-level textbook. It is a rigorous course that covers the fundamental concepts (atomic structure, molecular structure, chemical bonding, chemical reactions, and an introduction to thermodynamics.) Students who wish to enroll in CH4120 (AP Chemistry: Energy and Transformations) require a grade of B+ or better in CH3500 (or permission of the Dean of Science) and must complete the January-term prerequisite .

  •      CH3900

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Chemistry
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: January Term
    Meeting Times: Four week intensive January Term

    CH3900 Research Experience in Chemistry (*R*)

    This introductory course is for students who want to pursue a research opportunity in chemistry. No previous chemistry coursework is required. Students will reflect on their prior observations and learn how to read the primary scientific literature; learn how to select a research question and propose a hypothesis; learn experimental design and finally they will conduct experiments and analyze and present their data. Throughout the entire term, students learn scientific writing in the form of literature review, grant proposal, progress report, and research paper. Students also exercise aspects of scientific communication through individual study, group discussion, and lecture presentation. Students are encouraged to present their work at the NCSSM Research Symposium and/or other state and national competitions.

  •      CH4000

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Chemistry
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of CH3500 or by placement or permission of the Dean of Science.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Chemistry credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    CH4000 Chemistry Core II - Reactions & Energy

    This course is designed for students who already have proficiency in the concepts of chemistry that are introduced in CH3500. Additional topics covered in this course include chemical kinetics, equilibrium, acids and bases and electrochemistry. Students are exposed to instrumentation and computation as part of their lab skills development. Activities and labs are designed to provide opportunities for students to develop problem-solving and laboratory skills as they learn to design and conduct chemistry experiments, as well as to become independent learners. This course includes topics that satisfy the chemistry graduation requirement.

  •      CH4020

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Chemistry
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Chemistry credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    CH4020 AP Chemistry (I): Atoms & Molecules (*M*)

    This course provides a thorough introduction to chemical principles using a college-level textbook. It is a rigorous course that covers the fundamental concepts (atomic structure, molecular structure, chemical bonding, chemical reactions, and an introduction to thermodynamics.) It covers additional topics not contained in CH3500 and treats many areas in greater depth. Students should have strong math and abstract reasoning skills. This course provides the the foundation of the AP Chemistry curriculum but it is not complete; students interested in taking the AP Chemistry examination should also enroll in CH4120.

  •      CH4120

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Chemistry
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of CH4020 or by placement or permission of the Dean of Science.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit OR One Chemistry credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    CH4120 AP Chemistry (II): Kinetics & Energy

    This course is for students who completed a previous chemistry course that covered molecular structure and reactions and who qualify for a modified exemption. This course covers topics in chemical kinetics, equilibrium, acids and bases and electrochemistry. Emphasis is on completion of the AP chemistry curriculum along with further development of laboratory and problem solving skills. This course includes topics that satisfy the chemistry graduation requirement.

  •      CH4130

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Chemistry
    Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of CH3500, CH4000, or CH4020, or permission of the Dean of Science.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Chemistry credit OR One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    CH4130 Organic Chemistry

    This course introduces students to the structure, synthesis, and reactions of the major functional groups present in organic compounds. Reaction mechanisms, stereochemistry, and the prediction of products are covered. The laboratory involves synthetic and separation techniques and the use of physical and instrumental methods of verifying the products of reactions. Most of the experiments are performed at a micro scale level. This course includes topics that satisfy the chemistry graduation requirement.

  •      CH4140

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Chemistry
    Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of Chem Core I, or Chem Core II, or AP Chem I, or permission of the Dean of Science.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit OR One Chemistry credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    CH4140 Environmental Chem (*R*)

    This course focuses on the chemistry associated with topics of environmental concern such as acid rain, photochemical smog, global warming, and water and land pollution. Principles of sustainable development are addressed within each of these topics, and solutions that may contribute to a sustainable future are discussed. Laboratory activities include field and sampling trips that focus on the fate of chemicals in the environment. A service-learning component enables students to apply their knowledge and understanding to the solution of a local or regional environmental problem. This course includes topics that satisfy the chemistry graduation requirement.

  •      CH4150

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Chemistry
    Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of Chem Core I, or Chem Core II, or AP Chem I, or permission of the Dean of Science.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Chemistry credit OR One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    CH4150 Polymer Chemistry

    This course is an introduction to polymer science. Its scope includes fundamental principles of bonding as related to macromolecules and important structure-property relationships. Laboratory work includes natural polymer modification, synthesis of linear and cross-linked polymers, characterization of polymers using infrared spectroscopy, thermal analysis, and viscosity measurements. This course includes topics that satisfy the chemistry graduation requirement.

  •      CH4170/PH4170

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Chemistry
    Prerequisite(s): CH3500 or CH4020 AND PH3500 or PH4020
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Physics credit OR One Chemistry credit OR One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    CH4170/PH4170 Electrochemistry: Batteries, Fuel Cells and Solar Cells

    This course introduces students to the basics of applied electrochemistry, with an emphasis on the chemistry of technologies relevant to renewable energy, including primary and secondary batteries, fuel cells, and solar cells. Laboratory exercises emphasize construction and performance testing of various electrochemical energy systems. This course includes topics that satisfy the chemistry and physics graduation requirements.

  •      CH4170/PH4170

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Physics
    Prerequisite(s): CH3500 or CH4020 AND PH3500 or PH4020
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Physics credit OR One Chemistry credit OR One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    CH4170/PH4170 Electrochemistry: Batteries, Fuel Cells and Solar Cells

    This course introduces students to the basics of applied electrochemistry, with an emphasis on the chemistry of technologies relevant to renewable energy, including primary and secondary batteries, fuel cells, and solar cells. Laboratory exercises emphasize construction and performance testing of various electrochemical energy systems. This course includes topics that satisfy the chemistry and physics graduation requirements.

  •      CH4210

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Chemistry
    Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of any two NCSSM semester chemistry courses, or completion of one NCSSM semester chemistry course with a modified chemistry exemption, or exemption from the NCSSM core chemistry requirement.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit OR One Chemistry credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    CH4210 Introduction to Applied Chemistry and Engineering

    This course provides a comprehensive and multi-disciplinary overview of the global chemical industry, covering the chemical synthesis of major inorganic and organic products, chemical engineering concepts, and history and economics of the chemical industry. Four-member student teams conduct a trimester-long product development lab designed to meet product requirements determined via consumer market analysis. Students gain a broad understanding of the international chemical industry and of chemical engineering, acquire practical, real world experience with the product development process, and develop problem-solving skills within a teamwork model.

  •      CH4270

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Chemistry
    Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of Chem Core I, or Chem Core II, or AP Chem I, or permission of the Dean of Science.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Chemistry credit OR One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    CH4270 Analytical Chemistry

    This course delves into the methods used to determine unknown compounds and purify complex samples. We learn about different separation and purification techniques including, but not limited to thin-layer and reverse phase chromatography as well as instrumental analysis techniques such as gas chromatography (GC), high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), visible and ultraviolet spectroscopy (UV-VIS), fluorescence spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and infrared spectroscopy (IR). This course has an extensive laboratory component.

  •      CH4280

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Chemistry
    Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of any two NCSSM semester chemistry courses, or completion of one NCSSM semester chemistry course with a modified chemistry exemption, or exemption from the NCSSM core chemistry requirement.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    CH4280 Materials Chemistry

    This course explores the connection between material properties and the underlying chemical phenomena on which those properties depend. We examine the structure-function relationships that give rise to properties such as conductivity, elasticity, optical response, and material strength. In both the classroom and the laboratory, we explore polymers, inorganic semiconductors, ceramics and glasses, organic electronics (photovoltaics, batteries, LEDs), and more. We also consider special topics in surface chemical phenomena, responsive materials, and nanomaterials.

  •      CH4290

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Chemistry
    Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of any two NCSSM semester chemistry courses, or completion of one NCSSM semester chemistry course with a modified chemistry exemption, or exemption from the NCSSM core chemistry requirement. Completion of an NCSSM biology course is recommended but not required.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    CH4290 Biochemistry (*R*)

    This course introduces students to biochemistry that focuses on the chemical structure and dynamic interactions of the four major classes of biological macromolecules: proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates and lipids. Students examine the thermodynamics and kinetics of enzymes and explore how enzymes catalyze reactions in the cell. In the laboratory, students learn important biochemical techniques required to purify a protein and to analyze enzyme kinetics and protein-ligand interactions.

  •      CH4910

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Chemistry
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    CH4910 Research Computational Sci I

    This is an advanced course for students with the maturity, independence, and motivation necessary to conduct their own research project. Students learn computational methodology and design while conducting a variety of computational projects on a small scale. Students then write their own research proposals on a problem of interest to them. Throughout the semester, students read from the primary scienti?c literature and participate in discussion groups on current issues in computational science research. Based on the outcomes of the semester’s work, students may be given an opportunity to participate in summer research programs on campus or in the Triangle area. Students with a final grade of B or higher are encouraged to continue in CM444 Research in Computational Science II.

    Students who are accepted and enrolled in Research in Computational Science are expected to complete the entire sequence of courses including participation in 3 weeks of summer research on campus. This entire sequence includes 2 weeks of January Term in your junior year, Spring semester of your junior year, summer (3 weeks of SRIP) between the junior and senior year and Fall semester of your senior year. 

    Students must have a grade of B or higher to continue the sequence and have no major conduct violations to participate in SRIP.

    Fall 
    Jan Term 
    Spring 
    Summer 
    Jr Year 
    JTerm I
    Spring 
    SRIP
    Sr Year
    Fall

  •      CH4910

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Interdisciplinary Electives
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    CH4910 Research Computational Sci I

    This is an advanced course for students with the maturity, independence, and motivation necessary to conduct their own research project. Students learn computational methodology and design while conducting a variety of computational projects on a small scale. Students then write their own research proposals on a problem of interest to them. Throughout the semester, students read from the primary scienti?c literature and participate in discussion groups on current issues in computational science research. Based on the outcomes of the semester’s work, students may be given an opportunity to participate in summer research programs on campus or in the Triangle area. Students with a final grade of B or higher are encouraged to continue in CM444 Research in Computational Science II.

    Students who are accepted and enrolled in Research in Computational Science are expected to complete the entire sequence of courses including participation in 3 weeks of summer research on campus. This entire sequence includes 2 weeks of January Term in your junior year, Spring semester of your junior year, summer (3 weeks of SRIP) between the junior and senior year and Fall semester of your senior year. 

    Students must have a grade of B or higher to continue the sequence and have no major conduct violations to participate in SRIP.

    Fall 
    Jan Term 
    Spring 
    Summer 
    Jr Year 
    JTerm I
    Spring 
    SRIP
    Sr Year
    Fall

  •      CH4911

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Interdisciplinary Electives
    Prerequisite(s): CH4910 Research Computational Sci I
    Corequisite(s): none
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Chemistry credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    CH4911 Research Computational Sci II

    In this course, students continue to conduct computational research based on their previous trimester and/or summer work. Time is devoted to the completion of the research project and a written paper. Students are required to present their results at the NCSSM Research Symposium and are encouraged to present their research at the North Carolina Student Academy of Science competition and at other state and national competitions.

  •      CH4920

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Chemistry
    Prerequisite(s): By application in the Fall of the Junior year.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: January Term
    Schedule Requirements Met: January Term
    Meeting Times: Two week intensive January Term

    CH4920 Research Chem I (*R*)

    This is an advanced course for January Term junior students with the maturity, independence, and motivation necessary to conduct their own research project. Students learn the scientific method and experimental design before conducting a trial experiment on a small scale. Students then write a mini- literature review on the topic of interest to them. Throughout the term students read from the primary scientific literature and participate in discussion groups on current issues in biological research. 

    Students who are accepted and enrolled in Research in Chemistry are expected to complete the entire sequence of courses including participation in 3 weeks of summer research on campus.  This entire sequence includes 2 weeks of Jan Term in your junior year, Spring semester of your junior year, summer (3 weeks of SRIP) between the junior and senior year and Fall semester of your senior year. 

    Students must have a grade of B or higher to continue the sequence and have no major conduct violations to participate in SRIP.

    Fall 
    Jan Term 
    Spring 
    Summer 
    Jr Year 
    JTerm I
    Spring 
    SRIP
    Sr Year
    Fall

  •      CH4921

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Chemistry
    Prerequisite(s): Students with Junior standing apply in the Fall for entry in RChem I taught during the 1st two weeks of Jan Term.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit OR One Chemistry credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Seven periods per week and three labs

    CH4921 Research Chem II (*R*)

    This is an advanced course for second semester junior students who have completed the CH492. Students write a detailed research proposal. Students begin to learn additional techniques and to gather data for their experiments. Based on the outcomes of the term's work, students may be given an opportunity to participate in summer research programs on campus. 

    Students who are accepted and enrolled in Research in Chemistry are expected to complete the entire sequence of courses including participation in 3 weeks of summer research on campus.  This entire sequence includes 2 weeks of Jan Term in your junior year, Spring semester of your junior year, summer (3 weeks of SRIP) between the junior and senior year and Fall semester of your senior year. 

    Students must have a grade of B or higher to continue the sequence and have no major conduct violations to participate in SRIP.

    Fall 
    Jan Term 
    Spring 
    Summer 
    Jr Year 
    JTerm I
    Spring 
    SRIP
    Sr Year
    Fall

  •      CH4922

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Chemistry
    Prerequisite(s): Final grade of B or higher in Research in Chemistry II, or successful participation in a summer research program and permission of the Dean of Science.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Seven periods per week and three labs

    CH4922 Research Chem III (*R*)

    Students continue work on their previous research to produce additional data and conduct statistical analysis, as needed. They may research extension questions based on their original work. Students write a formal research paper and prepare a formal presentation. Students are required to present their results at the NCSSM Research Symposium in the spring and are encouraged to present their research at the North Carolina Student Academy of Science competition and other competitions. This course includes a significant research component

  •      CN3051

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week

    CN3051 Journeys into Chinese I

    Journeys into Chinese I is designed for those non-heritage Mandarin speakers who have never spoken or studied the language. This course provides students with the fundamentals for learning to understand, speak, and begin to read and write Mandarin Chinese. The course focuses on developing accurate pronunciation and tones, learning to understand the spoken language in context, and developing a foundation of basic sentence patterns, questions, and everyday vocabulary. The sound system (Pinyin and tones) and the writing system (radicals and stroke order) are presented in detail. Reading is used to support and reinforce the acquisition of the spoken language. The course is proficiency-based and its focus is on the development of listening and speaking skills.

  •      CN3052

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): CN3051, CH3061 or permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week

    CN3052 Journeys into Chinese II

    Journeys into Chinese II is designed for those who have learned Pinyin and basic characters and can understand and answer simple questions. This course provides students with the fundamentals for learning to understand, speak, read, and write Mandarin Chinese. The course focuses on learning to understand the spoken language in context and developing a foundation of basic sentence patterns, questions, and everyday vocabulary. Reading is used to support and reinforce the acquisition of the spoken language. The course is proficiency-based and its focus is on the development of listening and speaking skills. The class is conducted mainly in Chinese.


  •      CN3651

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): CN3052 or permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    CN3651 Navigating in Chinese + Global Understanding I

    Navigating in Chinese + Global Understanding is designed for students who are able to carry on basic conversations in Mandarin about everyday topics. The focus continues to be on the development of listening and speaking skills, with the specific goals of expanding vocabulary and exposing students to more sentence patterns. There is an additional focus on character/word analysis and reading strategies, composition skills, and cultural understanding. The course is proficiency-based, and class is conducted entirely in Chinese. A special feature of the course is a weekly shared virtual classroom with a high school in China. Students thus have the opportunity to engage in educational and cultural exchange with their counterparts in China, and to communicate in Chinese in real-life interactions with native speakers.

  •      CN3652

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): CN3651 or permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    CN3652 Navigating in Chinese + Global Understanding II

    Navigating in Chinese + Global Understanding is designed for students who are able to carry on basic conversations in Mandarin about everyday topics. The focus continues to be on the development of listening and speaking skills, with the specific goals of expanding vocabulary and exposing students to more sentence patterns. There is an additional focus on character/word analysis and reading strategies, composition skills, and cultural understanding. The course is proficiency-based, and class is conducted entirely in Chinese. A special feature of the course is a weekly shared virtual classroom with a high school in China. Students thus have the opportunity to engage in educational and cultural exchange with their counterparts in China, and to communicate in Chinese in real-life interactions with native speakers.

  •      CN4051

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): CN3652 or permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week

    CN4051 Advanced Chinese I

    Advanced Chinese is designed for students who are able to comfortably carry on extended conversations in Mandarin about everyday topics and to read the texts conveying basic and predictable information.  The primary focus of the course is on developing students' reading and composition abilities, while continuing to expand their listening and speaking skills. High frequency vocabulary, sentence patterns and text readings are introduced in order to support students' discussion of a broader range of topics and cultural understanding. Compositions are used to reinforce the vocabulary and patterns learned. The course is proficiency-based and conducted entirely in Chinese.

  •      CN4052

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Credits: 1
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week

    CN4052 Advanced Chinese II

  •      CN4161

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Prerequisite(s): CN3051, placement, or permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week and a lab

    CN4161 Navigating in Chinese + Global Understanding II

    Navigating in Chinese + Global Understanding is designed for students who are able to carry on basic conversations in Mandarin about everyday topics. The focus continues to be on the development of listening and speaking skills, with the specific goals of expanding vocabulary and exposing students to more sentence patterns. There is an additional focus on character/word analysis and reading strategies, composition skills, and cultural understanding. The course is proficiency-based, and class is conducted entirely in Chinese. A special feature of the course is a weekly shared virtual classroom with a high school in China. Students thus have the opportunity to engage in educational and cultural exchange with their counterparts in China, and to communicate in Chinese in real-life interactions with native speakers.

  •      CN4162

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Prerequisite(s): CN4161 or permission of Dean
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week and a lab

    CN4162 Navigating in Chinese + Global Understanding I

    Navigating in Chinese + Global Understanding is designed for students who are able to carry on basic conversations in Mandarin about everyday topics. The focus continues to be on the development of listening and speaking skills, with the specific goals of expanding vocabulary and exposing students to more sentence patterns. There is an additional focus on character/word analysis and reading strategies, composition skills, and cultural understanding. The course is proficiency-based, and class is conducted entirely in Chinese. A special feature of the course is a weekly shared virtual classroom with a high school in China. Students thus have the opportunity to engage in educational and cultural exchange with their counterparts in China, and to communicate in Chinese in real-life interactions with native speakers.

  •      CN4250

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Credits: 1
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week

    CN4250 Chinese for Heritage Speakers

  •      CN4351

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Prerequisite(s): Placement or permission of Dean
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week

    CN4351 Explorations of Chinese I

  •      CN4351

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Prerequisite(s): CN4162, placement, or permission from Dean
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week

    CN4351 Explorations of Chinese I

  •      CN4352

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Prerequisite(s): CN4351 or permission of Dean.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week

    CN4352 Explorations in Chinese II

  •      CN4500

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Prerequisite(s): Placement or permission from Dean.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week

    CN4500 Chinese for Heritage Speakers

  •      CN4651

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): CN4052 or CN4060, or permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week

    CN4651 Readings in Chinese with Topics I

    Readings in Chinese with Topics I is designed for students who are able to comfortably carry on extended conversations in Mandarin beyond everyday topics and comprehend readings containing 300 basic characters. The course focuses on developing students' reading and writing abilities while continuing to strengthen their listening and speaking skills. Expanding vocabulary and sentence patterns are also key goals in this course. By building these skills, students will further develop their ability to discuss various topics in a more sophisticated way. Students will also expand their cultural knowledge and language skills through reading and writing. The course is proficiency-based and conducted entirely in Chinese.

  •      CN4652

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): CN4352, CN4500, placement, or permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week

    CN4652 Readings in Chinese with Topics

    Readings in Chinese with Topics is designed for students who are able to comfortably carry on extended conversations in Mandarin beyond everyday topics and to comprehend texts in high frequency vocabulary with ease. The course focuses on developing students’ reading and writing abilities while continuing to strengthen their listening and speaking skills. Expanding vocabulary and sentence patterns are also key goals in this course. By building these skills, students further develop their ability to discuss various topics in a more sophisticated way. Students will also expand their cultural knowledge and language skills through reading and writing. The course is proficiency-based and conducted entirely in Chinese.

  •      CN4851

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): CN4652 or permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week

    CN4851 AP Chinese Language and Culture I

    This course is designed for students who are able to converse in Mandarin in more extended and complex ways and to read materials containing general vocabulary. Students develop and expand their speaking and listening abilities to make formal presentations, to narrate, describe, discuss, debate and persuade. Students also read authentic materials on a variety of topics related to Chinese culture, history and modern life. Students improve their composition skills through regular writing assignments. The basics of Classical Chinese are introduced. Students deepen their cross-cultural communication skills by continuing to observe and compare cultural commonalities, similarities, and differences. The course is proficiency-based and conducted entirely in Chinese. This course prepares students for the AP exam.

  •      CN4852

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): CN4851 or permission of the Dean of Humanities
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week

    CN4852 AP Chinese Language and Culture II

    This course is a continuation of CN4851 and is designed for students who are able to converse in Mandarin in more extended and complex ways and read simple Chinese writings. Students develop and expand their speaking and listening abilities to make formal presentations, to narrate, describe, discuss, debate and persuade. Students also read authentic materials on a variety of topics related to Chinese culture, history and modern life. Students improve their composition skills through regular writing assignments. The basics of Classical Chinese are introduced. Students deepen their cross-cultural communication skills by continuing to observe and compare cultural commonalities, similarities, and differences. The course is proficiency-based and conducted entirely in Chinese. This course prepares students for the AP exam.

  •      CN4951

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): CN4852 or permission of the Dean of Humanities
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week

    CN4951 Advanced Readings in Chinese with Topics I

    This course is designed for students who earned a score of 4 or 5 on the AP Chinese Language and Culture Exam. Students read authentic materials on a variety of topics related to Chinese culture, history and contemporary life. Students improve their narrating, describing, debating and persuading skills. The basics of Classical Chinese are introduced. Students deepen their cross-cultural communication skills by continuing to observe and compare cultural commonalities, similarities, and differences. The course is proficiency-based and conducted entirely in Chinese.

  •      CN4952

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): CN4951 or permission of the Dean of Humanities
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week

    CN4952 Advanced Readings in Chinese with Topics II

    This course is designed for students who earned a score of 4 or 5 on the AP Chinese Language and Culture Exam. Students read authentic materials on a variety of topics related to Chinese culture, history and contemporary life. Students improve their narrating, describing, debating and persuading skills. The basics of Classical Chinese are introduced. Students deepen their cross-cultural communication skills by continuing to observe and compare cultural commonalities, similarities, and differences. The course is proficiency-based and conducted entirely in Chinese.

  •      CS4020

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Engineering & Computer Science
    Subject: Computer Science
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit OR One Computer Science / Engineering credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    CS4020 Web Development

    This beginning course introduces the basic ideas of computing via the World Wide Web through the creation of dynamic web pages. Three layers are built: HTML, for document structure, CSS for document appearance, and JavaScript for page behavior. JavaScript, a full-featured, Turing-complete programming language, is used to learn the fundamental components of programming: variables, objects, functions, conditional logic, and iteration. In-class individual and group work culminates in an individual or group project chosen by the students.

  •      CS4040

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Engineering & Computer Science
    Subject: Computer Science
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Computer Science / Engineering credit OR One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    CS4040 Game Design and Simulation

    his course provides an introduction to game design principles and programming concepts. Students will learn the foundations of computer science while learning how to apply these concepts in the context of game design. The course will start by introducing fundamental computer science concepts such as variables, data types, conditional statements, loops, functions, and classes. After mastering these concepts, students will be introduced to proper game design techniques to develop playable games in multiple formats. Students will work on different projects throughout the course, where they will be expected to apply the principles learned to design and develop games. This includes developing an idea of what makes a game fun, and having rules and environments that support users to feel that the game experience is pleasing yet challenging, with the MDA (Mechanics, Dynamics, Aesthetics) format. A culminating final project will be developed to showcase game development knowledge and skill set.

  •      CS4070/AR4070

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Engineering & Computer Science
    Subject: Computer Science
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Computer Science / Engineering credit OR One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week and two labs

    CS4070/AR4070 Art, Technology, and Computing

    This course asks students to expand on their definition of art to include technology as a platform for creativity. Students will learn the foundations of art, electronics, and programming in a unique course that asks them to maintain a journal, schematics, and programming cheat sheets. Students will develop their skills in a collaborative environment and make use of the art studio as well as the FabLab to bring their creative ideas into existence. The goal of this course is to develop and expand on creative skills and construct innovative and interactive work of arts. Students will gain knowledge and appreciation of art history while becoming more familiar with artists who are working with groundbreaking methods and materials. Students will learn the fundamentals of electronics to learn how to sense information from the surrounding environment and drive outputs to interact with and impact the environment. Programming concepts such as variables, functions, conditional logic, iteration, and objects are taught in the context of artistic expression.

  •      CS4110/EE4110

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Engineering & Computer Science
    Subject: Computer Science
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit OR One Computer Science / Engineering credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week and a lab

    CS4110/EE4110 Introductory Robotics

    This course provides students with the opportunity to develop skills in programming and design using an autonomous robot. Students will explore the use of sensors and learn to troubleshoot mechanical and software issues as they create a robot that reacts to its environment and completes challenges. Self-guided skill development early in the semester is followed by a series of project challenges emphasizing teamwork and design.

  •      CS4110/EE4110

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Engineering & Computer Science
    Subject: Engineering
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit OR One Computer Science / Engineering credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week and a lab

    CS4110/EE4110 Introductory Robotics

    This course provides students with the opportunity to develop skills in programming and design using an autonomous robot. Students will explore the use of sensors and learn to troubleshoot mechanical and software issues as they create a robot that reacts to its environment and completes challenges. Self-guided skill development early in the semester is followed by a series of project challenges emphasizing teamwork and design.

  •      CS4120

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Engineering & Computer Science
    Subject: Computer Science
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit OR One Computer Science / Engineering credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    CS4120 Computing for Everyone

    This course is an introduction to basic programming skills and to the Python 3 programming language. Python is one of the most popular programming languages and is the language of choice for data science, machine learning and humanities research. Topics covered will include variables, expressions and statements, functions, conditionals, loops, recursion, string manipulation, input/output statements, lists, and dictionaries. Students will learn to develop and code solutions to problems consistent with challenges found in mathematics, science, engineering and the humanities.

  •      CS4200/MA4200

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Engineering & Computer Science
    Subject: Computer Science
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit OR One Computer Science / Engineering credit OR One Mathematics credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    CS4200/MA4200 Cryptography

    Cross listed as MA4200. This course introduces students to cryptographic methods used to encipher and decipher secret messages with an emphasis on using computer programming to automate the process. Through class discussions, problem solving, group activities, and programming assignments, students will learn a variety of encryption schemes ranging from the age of Caesar to modern public key encryption used to secure digital communications online. Students will learn introductory number theory and statistics to describe these methods and identify weaknesses that allow secret messages to be read without the key. Students will also learn programming topics such as variables, functions, conditional logic, looping, and file input/output in the Python language to implement each cryptographic method. This course will utilize a blended learning environment with large portions of material being taught online and utilizing in class time for working in groups.

  •      CS4200/MA4200

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Mathematics
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit OR One Computer Science / Engineering credit OR One Mathematics credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    CS4200/MA4200 Cryptography

    Cross listed as MA4200. This course introduces students to cryptographic methods used to encipher and decipher secret messages with an emphasis on using computer programming to automate the process. Through class discussions, problem solving, group activities, and programming assignments, students will learn a variety of encryption schemes ranging from the age of Caesar to modern public key encryption used to secure digital communications online. Students will learn introductory number theory and statistics to describe these methods and identify weaknesses that allow secret messages to be read without the key. Students will also learn programming topics such as variables, functions, conditional logic, looping, and file input/output in the Python language to implement each cryptographic method. This course will utilize a blended learning environment with large portions of material being taught online and utilizing in class time for working in groups.

  •      CS4230

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Engineering & Computer Science
    Subject: Computer Science
    Prerequisite(s): CS4120: Computing for Everyone or Permission of the CS Chair
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit OR One Computer Science / Engineering credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Two periods per week and a lab

    CS4230 Networks and the Web

    This course introduces students to how computer networks operate, and how we can use them in the development of software. Students will use client-side technologies such as HTML, CSS, and JavaScript to create interactive web applications. We will then extend that knowledge to the server-side to allow communication over a network between multiple people. Topics include: Box Model, UX Design, Web Sockets, and NodeJS.

  •      CS4270

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Engineering & Computer Science
    Subject: Computer Science
    Prerequisite(s): CS4020: Web Development; CS4040:Game Design and Simulation; CS4120:Computing for Everyone; CS/MA4200:Cryptography; CS/AR4070 Art, Technology and Computing or Placement Exam
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit OR One Computer Science / Engineering credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week and a lab

    CS4270 Fundamentals of Object-Oriented Design

    This is a second course in computer science which achieves two major goals: one is building skill in writing coherent programs that implement algorithms; the second is using classes and objects to assist in separating concerns through encapsulation and modularization. It is a course meant to turn good programmers into good computer scientists. We will discuss the various ways data can be stored and how the flow of programs can be manipulated. Finally, we will study the object model including problem decomposition, polymorphism, and inheritance. While this course does not exhaustively cover all concepts on the AP Computer Science A exam, it can be used to assist with preparation for the exam.

  •      CS4320

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Engineering & Computer Science
    Subject: Computer Science
    Prerequisite(s): CS4240 Procedural and Object-Oriented Programming or CS4260 Java with Topics or placement test.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit OR One Computer Science / Engineering credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    CS4320 Machine Learning

    This course teaches basic machine learning concepts, algorithms and their applications using Python and associated software libraries. Machine learning concepts include where ML fits within AI, Data Science, and Statistics, where ML is being commonly used, and the larger societal context including possible ethical concerns. Machine learning techniques include supervised learning, unsupervised learning, and reinforcement learning. Applications may include implementation of decision trees, neural networks, and other frameworks. This course features a final project allowing students to apply machine learning techniques to a problem of interest to them. This course requires advanced programming skill and expects mastery of the Python programming language as evidenced by meeting the course prerequisite or by placement exam.

  •      CS4330

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Engineering & Computer Science
    Subject: Computer Science
    Prerequisite(s): CS4230 or CS4270
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit OR One Computer Science / Engineering credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week and a lab

    CS4330 Server-Side Development

    This project-based course merges HTML/CSS, JavaScript, and Python to create dynamic web applications and distributed networks. Students will use database technologies such as SQL or MongoDB to customize web sites for individual users. Security implications will be addressed as students learn how to program and deploy their own web server. Topics include: threads, databases, network APIs, and hashing.

  •      CS4350

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Engineering & Computer Science
    Subject: Computer Science
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): CS4240 Procedural and Object-Oriented Programming or a score of 4 or 5 on AP CS A exam.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Computer Science / Engineering credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    CS4350 Data Structures and Algorithms

    Data Structures and Algorithms is a project-based course covering material generally found in a second semester undergraduate computer science major course. Students will explore foundational data structure and their application to computing concepts. Students will also learn how to analyze data structures and algorithms for efficiency to determine which data structure is most appropriate for a given scenario.  Specific data structures covered include: linked lists, binary trees, heaps, hashmaps and graphs.

  •      CS4380

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Engineering & Computer Science
    Subject: Computer Science
    Prerequisite(s): CS4340 Data Structures with C or by placement test.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit OR One Computer Science / Engineering credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    CS4380 Algorithms

    Students use the C programming language to study and implement basic data structures, including heaps, priority queues, and hash tables and the relevant algorithms and applications. Students choose and implement a case study of a related advanced topic.

  •      CS4400/EE4400

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Engineering & Computer Science
    Subject: Computer Science
    Prerequisite(s): Introductory Robotics and/or placement; approval by robotics competition advisor
    Corequisite(s): Membership on your home campus in a robotics competition
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit OR One Computer Science / Engineering credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week and a lab OR two 90 min lab periods

    CS4400/EE4400: Robotics Design for Competition

    Robotic Design is a project-based course focusing on robotic applications for national robotic competitions that are supported by NCSSM on the student's campus. Students will learn soft skills including project management, team management, professional documentation, and presentation skills. Students will also develop more robust technical skills in fabrication, sensor data implementation, computer vision, path-planning, kinematics, machine learning, ROS framework, and much more. Students with no previous robotics experience should first take Introductory Robotics, seek placement by exam. Competition sponsors must approve students taking this course.

  •      CS4400/EE4400

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Engineering & Computer Science
    Subject: Engineering
    Prerequisite(s): Introductory Robotics and/or placement; approval by robotics competition advisor
    Corequisite(s): Membership on your home campus in a robotics competition
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit OR One Computer Science / Engineering credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week and a lab OR two 90 min lab periods

    CS4400/EE4400: Robotics Design for Competition

    Robotic Design is a project-based course focusing on robotic applications for national robotic competitions that are supported by NCSSM on the student's campus. Students will learn soft skills including project management, team management, professional documentation, and presentation skills. Students will also develop more robust technical skills in fabrication, sensor data implementation, computer vision, path-planning, kinematics, machine learning, ROS framework, and much more. Students with no previous robotics experience should first take Introductory Robotics, seek placement by exam. Competition sponsors must approve students taking this course.

  •      CS4900

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Engineering & Computer Science
    Subject: Computer Science
    Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Dean of Engineering and Computer Science.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Computer Science / Engineering credit OR One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    CS4900 Advanced Computer Science Topics

    This course offers an opportunity for students with an especially strong background in computer science to pursue a rigorous study of a topic outside the standard curriculum. This course is intended for students who have exhausted the other course offerings in computer science or who wish to do independent research in computer science.

  •      CS4920

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Engineering & Computer Science
    Subject: Computer Science
    Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Dean of Engineering and Computer Science.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit OR One Computer Science / Engineering credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    CS4920 Advanced Computer Science Topics

    This course offers an opportunity for students with an especially strong background in computer science to pursue a rigorous study of a topic outside the standard curriculum. This course is intended for students who have exhausted the other course offerings in computer science or who wish to do independent research in computer science.

  •      DR4101

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Drama
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One elective credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: Additional elective
    Meeting Times: One 100-min. evening period per week

    DR4101 Theater Performance Workshop: Scene Study and Choice

    This course focuses on the craft of stage performance beginning with rudiments of stageworthy presence and building outwards to develop the skills and vocabulary of the theater artist. Our focus is on creating character and story using various approaches to movement on stage including Viewpoints, Roy Hart, and Stanislavski. Students will work as individuals and as cooperative ensembles in text analysis and scene study with both devised and existing texts. During each class, students participate in acting exercises that include structured peer feedback and often require physical activity. The semester will culminate in a brief performance by the full ensemble that may include found, devised, and/or existing script text. In addition, enrolled students apply their classroom experience by engaging as artist or audience with the coinciding mainstage theatrical production. No previous experience is required. Repeatable for credit.

  •      DR4102

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Drama
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One elective credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: Additional elective
    Meeting Times: One 100-min. evening period per week

    DR4102 Theater Performance Workshop: Unacting and Movement

    This course focuses on the craft of stage performance beginning with rudiments of vocal presence and building outwards to develop the skills and vocabulary of the theater artist. Our focus is on creating character and story using various approaches to voice on stage including Linklater, Roy Hart, and Rodenberg. Students will work as individuals and as cooperative ensembles in text analysis and scene study with both devised and existing texts. During each class, students participate in acting exercises that include structured peer feedback and often require physical activity. The semester will culminate in a brief performance by the full ensemble that may include found, devised, and/or existing script text. In addition, enrolled students apply their classroom experience by engaging as artist or audience with the coinciding mainstage theatrical production. No previous experience is required. Repeatable for credit.

  •      EE3080

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Engineering & Computer Science
    Subject: Engineering
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit OR One Computer Science / Engineering credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week and a lab

    EE3080 History of Engin'g & Tech

    This course explores the history of engineering and technology in its cultural, ethical, and scientific context. We focus on historical readings, projects, and labs to illuminate the development and relevance of this history.

  •      EE3100

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Engineering & Computer Science
    Subject: Engineering
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Computer Science / Engineering credit OR One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    EE3100 CAD/CAM

    This course provides in-depth instruction in computer graphics. The goal of this course is to learn how to use computer-aided design (CAD) software to graphically represent two-dimensional and three-dimensional objects. This course emphasizes product design, assembly drawing, and exploded views. This course is well-suited to students considering a career in engineering or research, and for those students who wish to become more effective in visually communicating technical information in any profession. The final project is an original design of a functional object complete with all drawings necessary for its construction.

  •      EE3620

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Engineering & Computer Science
    Subject: Engineering
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit OR One Computer Science / Engineering credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week and a lab

    EE3620 Engineering the Modern

    This course examines the transformations in engineering, science, and the arts that define the birth of Modernism in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The visual arts, music, architecture, literature, engineering, science, and technology are examined against the background of historical and political events in order to comprehend the links between the arts, technology, engineering, and science. Topics include the construction of the Brooklyn and Eads Bridges, steel and the skyscraper, Frank Lloyd Wright, the Wright Brothers and the airplane, Einstein and Heisenberg, World War I's impact and technology, automation and the automobile, the computer, the movies, Dada, Kafka, Woolf, and the emergence of abstraction in art and atonality in music. Assessments for the course are designed to allow students to develop their analytical reasoning, critical thinking skills, and ability to communicate ideas across disciplines.

  •      EE3900

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Engineering & Computer Science
    Subject: Engineering
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit OR One Computer Science / Engineering credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    EE3900 Research Experience in Engineering and Computer Science

    This introductory course is for students who wish to pursue a research opportunity in engineering. Participants learn basic research skills in methodology, research design, and literature review. During the first part of the course students learn to design and conduct an experiment, analyze data, and present their findings in a written paper. In addition, students read and discuss research articles, including those of local professional engineers. When possible, a local engineer joins us in the laboratory for a hands-on, directed project. The second portion of the course is devoted to working in small groups on a research project. Research questions may be selected from an area identified by the instructor (examples: mechanical engineering, civil/environmental engineering, or biomechanics), or from topics proposed by the student if appropriate. Students then write a final paper describing their research project and make a formal oral presentation of their findings.

  •      EE4000

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Engineering & Computer Science
    Subject: Engineering
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Computer Science / Engineering credit OR One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    EE4000 Mechanical Engineering

    This course introduces students to the study and practice of mechanical engineering. Using activities, design projects, and laboratory modules students learn how engineers use mathematics and science to design efficient and beneficial devices such as automobiles, power plants, airplanes, machinery, and heating/cooling equipment. Topics include engineering design, simple machines, mechanisms, materials, dynamics, heat transfer, thermodynamics, fluid dynamics, and modeling.

  •      EE4020

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Engineering & Computer Science
    Subject: Engineering
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit OR One Computer Science / Engineering credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    EE4020 Electrical Engineering

    This course introduces students to topics important to the fields of electrical, electronic, and computer engineering. Using activities, laboratory modules, and a major design project students learn first-hand how electrical engineers analyze and solve problems. Topics include basic DC and AC circuits, OpAmps, semiconductors, and logic design.

  •      EE4040

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Engineering & Computer Science
    Subject: Engineering
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Computer Science / Engineering credit OR One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    EE4040 Architecture

    This course introduces students to the field of architecture. Students use industry-standard software (Revit Architecture) to design buildings. Driven by hands-on projects and activities, this course covers topics such as architectural history, structural engineering, green building, project planning, site planning, building design, and project documentation. The final project is the design of a a commercial building, giving students the opportunity to model the real-world experiences of architects.

  •      EE4080

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Engineering & Computer Science
    Subject: Engineering
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit OR One Computer Science / Engineering credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    EE4080 Biomedical Engineering

    This course introduces students to the different sub-specialties of biomedical engineering including biomaterials, biomechanics, bioelectricity, biomedical devices, and measurements, as well as design. Through hands-on labs, activities, and collaborative design projects students kinesthetically explore and experience biomedical engineering principles, the engineering design process, and problem solving and troubleshooting.

  •      EE4100

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Engineering & Computer Science
    Subject: Engineering
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Computer Science / Engineering credit OR One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    EE4100 Introductory Robotics

    This project-based course introduces students to the fundamentals of robotics including the building and programming of autonomous robots using basic sensors and programming tools. Students also gain teamwork and design experience. Topics include basic sense and response programming, compound gear trains, kinematics, and rotary-linear motion assemblies. A significant portion of the course is dedicated to the iteration process of adding functionality to a base robot.

  •      EE4140

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Engineering & Computer Science
    Subject: Engineering
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit OR One Computer Science / Engineering credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    EE4140 Aerospace Engineering

    This course introduces students to the field of aerospace engineering, engineering design, and the core math and science concepts needed to solve problems related to aerospace and other engineering disciplines. The course is presented with historical context, emphasizing the development of human flight from antiquity through modern aviation and on into current and future exploration of space. Topics include spatial reasoning, properties of fluids, descriptions of 3-dimensional motion, the mechanics of flight, and basic aero- and thermodynamic principles applied to the design and control of aircraft and spacecraft. Students have opportunities to experiment, calculate, compute, design and build as they explore and solve problems associated with the mechanics of flight, and are encouraged to earn course credit through aerospace-themed projects of their own design.

  •      EE4145

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Engineering & Computer Science
    Subject: Engineering
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): PH3500 Physics Core: Mechanics, or PH4020, or PH4240 & MA4000 PreCalculus
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit OR One Computer Science / Engineering credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: One period per week AND two 100-min evening periods

    EE4145 Rocketry Design for Competition

    This course provides students with an authentic engineering modeling and design experience in accordance with the objectives of the annual American Rocketry Challenge, sponsored by the Aerospace Industries Association. Topics include Newton’s laws of motion, propulsion, aerodynamics, and recovery techniques as well as the history of space programs and orbital mechanics. Course activities will include iterative engineering design, rocket construction, flight modeling and data analysis. Required rocket launches, including as many as two launches scheduled on weekends, may occur outside of the regular course schedule. Students are encouraged to participate in the American Rocketry Challenge as part of the NCSSM rocketry team, and students with previous rocketry experience may choose to focus class build activities on achieving National Association of Rocketry High Power Certification.

  •      EE4160

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Engineering & Computer Science
    Subject: Engineering
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit OR One Computer Science / Engineering credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    EE4160 Civil Engineering

    This course introduces students to the study and practice of civil engineering and to math and science concepts needed to solve problems related to this and other engineering disciplines. Topics include the engineering design process, engineering mathematics, applied and reactive forces and moments, static equilibrium, distributed loadings, strength of materials, and stress and buckling analyses for structures in tension, compression, and bending. Activities include small-scale laboratory explorations, design projects inspired by the profession, data acquisition and computational modeling.

  •      EE4180

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Engineering & Computer Science
    Subject: Engineering
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit OR One Computer Science / Engineering credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    EE4180 Environmental Engineering

    This course introduces students to the study and practice of environmental engineering and to math and science concepts needed to solve problems related to these and other engineering disciplines. Topics include engineering design, hydrology and water resources, stormwater modeling and management, drinking and wastewater treatment, pollutant fate and transport, health effects of environmental pollutants, and mitigation and remediation strategies. Activities include small-scale laboratory explorations, design projects inspired by the profession, field measurement, online data acquisition and computational modeling.

  •      EE4200

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Engineering & Computer Science
    Subject: Engineering
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Computer Science / Engineering credit OR One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    EE4200 Digital Agriculture and Engineering

    This course introduces students to the application of digital technologies to agricultural production. These tools enable farmers to boost yields and income globally while reducing the environmental impact of agriculture. Topics of study include crop plant physiology, controlled environment agriculture, precision agriculture, Internet of Things, automation, and artificial intelligence. For projects, students will design and prototype scientifc instruments, smart devices, and growing environments to optimize crop production.

  •      EE4300

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Engineering & Computer Science
    Subject: Engineering
    Prerequisite(s): Robotics Jterm
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit OR One Computer Science / Engineering credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Two periods per week

    EE4300 Topics In Engineering - Robotics Design

    This course will present engineering topics that are not part of the regular offerings of the department of engineering and computer science and can focus on a variety of topics, with special emphasis to those involving engineering design. Robotics Design is for students who want to pursue a more formal design experience as part of NCSSM's FIRST Robotics Team, the Zebracorns. It is for students with the motivation, independence, and maturity necessary to conduct their own design projects in robotics, either related to software and control or mechanical design. Students can use industry-leading robotics software, the Robotics Operating System, to integrate sensor and machine learning systems required for robot control, build machine learning models, interfaces, or they can learn CAD (OnShape) to design a variety of mechanisms using motors, actuators, and pneumatics. Both the software and mechanical designs will undergo design reviews and can be tested under real world conditions, requiring sustained reliable operation, during the FIRST Robotics competition season. Final projects can include white papers and engineering design portfolios. Students will be accepted to this course by application.

  •      EE4520

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Engineering & Computer Science
    Subject: Engineering
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): B or higher in EE4020 Electrical Engineering or EE4080 Biomedical Engineering, or through an exemption test.
    Corequisite(s): MA4020 AP Calculus AB or higher.
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit OR One Computer Science / Engineering credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    EE4520 Biomedical Instrumentation

    In this course students learn the basic principles of electronic instrumentation with biomedical examples. Concepts of analog signal processing, filters, and input and output impedances are emphasized. Students are exposed to system design concepts such as amplifier design and various transducers. Laboratories reinforce basic concepts and offer the student design opportunities in groups. Course includes a final design project.

  •      EE4540

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Engineering & Computer Science
    Subject: Engineering
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): PH4020 or higher or permission of the Dean of Engineering and Computer Science.
    Corequisite(s): MA4020 AP Calculus AB or higher.
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Computer Science / Engineering credit OR One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week

    EE4540 Statics

    In this course students learn how to apply the principles of Mechanics to problems of equilibrium. Topics include: vectors, moments, analysis of force systems (trusses, frames, and machines), rigid body equilibrium, center of gravity, and moment of inertia.

  •      EE4560

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Engineering & Computer Science
    Subject: Engineering
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Calculus and final grade of B or higher in EE4020 Electrical Engineering or through an exemption test.
    Corequisite(s): MA4020 AP Calculus AB or higher.
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit OR One Computer Science / Engineering credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week and two labs

    EE4560 Circuits

    In this course, students continue the study of electrical circuits, including DC circuit analysis and theorems, op-amps, first and second order circuits, transient analysis, AC sinusoids and phasors, sinusoidal steady-rate analysis, AC power analysis, three-phase circuits, magnetically coupled circuits, frequency response, and Laplace and Fourier transforms.

  •      EN4200

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of AS4051/AS4052 American Studies I/II OR completion of AS4051 and approval of the Dean of Humanities during Spring Administrative Adjustment. Juniors may not request this course until Spring Administrative Adjustment.
    Corequisite(s): none
    Graduation Requirements Met: One English credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods and a lab OR two 100-min. evening periods

    EN4200 African Studies: Pre-colonial Africa

    In this course, we reflect on the realities and representations of Africa's pre-colonial past before the advent of European political domination around 1880. We consider how Africans, Europeans, and the African diaspora have attributed meaning to the place called Africa. We examine how power, trade, and production have intersected with human lives on a global stage. We discuss how humans have tried to make sense of their life situations in relation to Africa and how the diverse peoples of the continent have communicated their particular contexts.

  •      EN4210

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of AS4051/AS4052 American Studies I/II OR completion of AS4051 and approval of the Dean of Humanities during Spring Administrative Adjustment. Juniors may not request this course until Spring Administrative Adjustment.
    Corequisite(s): none
    Graduation Requirements Met: One English credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods and a lab OR two 100-min. evening periods

    EN4210 African Studies: Modern Africa

    In this course, we explore Africa's recent events, predicaments, and accomplishments. We learn how late nineteenth-century colonialism, anti-colonial resistance, nationalism, independence, modernization, post-colonialism, and neo-colonialism have affected and shaped modern Africa. One way to try to understand the reality of modern Africa is to see multiple aspects of that reality through the eyes of Africans themselves as well as through the eyes of outside observers. We thus turn to writers, scholars, and filmmakers to gain a critical understanding of Africa's historical and contemporary events and experiences.

  •      EN4211

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of AS4051/AS4052 American Studies I/II and OR completion of AS4051 and approval of the Dean of Humanities during Spring Administrative Adjustment. Juniors may not request this course until Spring Administrative Adjustment.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One English credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods and a lab OR two 100-min. evening periods

    EN4211 East Asian Studies I

    This interdisciplinary course ranges from the ancient civilizations and foundational ethical structures of East Asia to the Mongol invasions and their aftermath. Drawing from the fields of archaeology, history, literature, and cultural studies, students trace the development of early China, Japan, and Korea. Students examine texts from early religious and literary traditions, including Buddhism, Confucianism, Daoism, and Shinto. Texts may include Buddhist sutras, Confucius' Analects, Laozi's Dao de Jing, T'ang poetry, Lady Shonagon's Pillow Book, Luo Guanzhong’s Romance of the Three Kingdoms, Lady Murasaki Shikibu's Tale of Genji, and the Tale of the Heike. The class consists of a creative mix of lectures, discussions, and verbal and written analyses of moving and still images. Students continue to develop their writing skills by writing academic and interpretive essays on interdisciplinary topics as well as creative works that emulate East Asian genres. Students also collaborate on projects in which they produce their own artwork (such as digital and terrestrial gardens, curated museum exhibits, and revisions and additions to literary masterpieces) to demonstrate their understanding of East Asian cultures and accomplishments.

  •      EN4212

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of AS4051/AS4052 American Studies I/II and OR completion of AS4051 and approval of the Dean of Humanities during Spring Administrative Adjustment. Juniors may not request this course until Spring Administrative Adjustment.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One English credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods and a lab OR two 100-min. evening periods

    EN4212 East Asian Studies II

    This interdisciplinary course begins with the Ming dynasty in China and the Ashikaga Shogunate in Japan. A major focus of this course is the experience of East Asian societies as they confront internal challenges and Western colonizers. Primary texts include Zen parables, Kenko's “Essays in Idleness,” Basho's poetry, Journey to the West, Dream of the Red Chamber, and Outlaws of the Marsh. The second part of the course presents a radically changed and dynamic landscape. We explore the upheavals of the early twentieth century, including the world wars and revolutionary restructuring of East Asian politics and societies. We explore the significance of modernism and postmodernism in contemporary Asian cultural expressions with an emphasis on the cartoon visions found in manga and anime. Texts may include Kawabata's Snow Country or Tanizaki's Naomi, manga and anime, writings of Mao Zedong, CCP propaganda posters, Ai Wei Wei's art, kung fu and samurai film clips, and Zhang Yimou’s To Live. The class consists of a creative mix of lectures, discussions, and verbal and written analyses of moving and still images. Students continue to develop their writing skills by writing academic and interpretive essays on interdisciplinary topics as well as creative works that emulate East Asian genres. Students also collaborate on projects where they produce their own artwork (such as kung fu and samurai film scripts reflecting East Asian geopolitical realities, visual depictions of futuristic dystopias drawing from techno-Orientalist stereotypes, etc.) to demonstrate their understanding of East Asian cultures and accomplishments.

  •      EN4215

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of AS4051/AS4052 American Studies I/II and OR completion of AS4051 and approval of the Dean of Humanities during Spring Administrative Adjustment. Juniors may not request this course until Spring Administrative Adjustment.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One English credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods and a lab OR two 100-min. evening periods

    EN4215 Asian American Studies

    Asian American and Pacific Islander people are playing an ever-increasing role in shaping American society. These diverse peoples are complexly connected to more than fifty cultures and societies, including but not limited to the Pacific Islands and South, Southeast, Western, and East Asia. This interdisciplinary course addresses key themes in Asian American history and considers many different kinds of Asian American texts, including novels, poetry, plays, short stories, film, pop culture, primary historical texts, and interdisciplinary scholarship. Through these texts and more, students will explore how Asian Americans navigate the challenges, privileges, and possibilities that they experience at the intersections of race, class, gender, sexuality, ability, religion, indigeneity, and new forms of belonging and identity in a global age. In the face of stereotypes, racism, violence, militarization, and multiple forms of colonialism and empire, how do Asian Americans nevertheless affirm their identities, enjoy their lives, and act with integrity and agency?

  •      EN4220

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of AS4051/AS4052 American Studies I/II OR completion of AS4051 and approval of the Dean of Humanities during Spring Administrative Adjustment. Juniors may not request this course until Spring Administrative Adjustment.
    Corequisite(s): none
    Graduation Requirements Met: One English credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods and a lab OR two 100-min. evening periods

    EN4220 African Studies: North Africa and the Middle East

    This course is an introduction to the cultural, political, social, and economic aspects of modern North Africa and the Middle East, from Napoleon's Egyptian invasion to the present Syrian crisis. Proceeding chronologically and thematically, we explore a wide range of North African and Middle Eastern self-identities and stories. Together, we think about North Africa's and the Middle East's ever-changing relations with sub-Saharan Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Americas. We reflect on the specific collective memories that help varied peoples from Algerian Islamic fundamentalists to Ashkenazi Israeli settlers explain who they are, what they are doing, and where they are going.

  •      EN4231

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of AS4051/AS4052 American Studies I/II and OR completion of AS4051 and approval of the Dean of Humanities during Spring Administrative Adjustment. Juniors may not request this course until Spring Administrative Adjustment.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One English credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods and a lab OR two 100-min. evening periods

    EN4231 Latin American Studies I

    This interdisciplinary course takes a transatlantic approach to the investigation of the native and colonial cultures of Latin America and the Caribbean, from the pre-Columbian era to the early nineteenth century. We examine indigenous civilizations—including those of the Mayans, Aztecs, and Incas—along with the Renaissance backgrounds of the European conquests and the flowering of a new economy of imagination for both Europeans and natives. We investigate the complex world view that produced innovations in cartography and navigation in Europe, as well as the religious and social motivations of Iberian explorers and how their attitudes differed from their English and French counterparts. We look at the blended culture of the Caribbean and at the nature of slave culture in Brazil and the Caribbean, along with constructions of color and understandings of race that differ markedly from those in North America. Literary works include selections from the Mayan Popol Vuh, the chronicles of European explorers like Christopher Columbus and Bernal Díaz del Castillo, and writings by Catalina de Erauso and Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz.

  •      EN4232

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of AS4051/AS4052 American Studies I/II and OR completion of AS4051 and approval of the Dean of Humanities during Spring Administrative Adjustment. Juniors may not request this course until Spring Administrative Adjustment.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One English credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods and a lab OR two 100-min. evening periods

    EN4232 Latin American Studies II

    This interdisciplinary course explores both the quest for independence and the world after independence, along with the search for authentic national literatures and national and international identities, among Latin American and Latino peoples from the early nineteenth century through the early twenty-first century. As a part of this effort, we focus extensively on United States-Latin American relations. Finally, we explore a variety of works by major Latin American historical and literary figures including Juana Manuela Gorriti, Joaquim Maria Machado de Assis, José Martí, Rubén Darío, Ernesto “Che” Guevara, Gabriel GarcÍa Marquez, and Isabel Allende.

  •      EN4233

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of AS4051/AS4052 American Studies I/II and OR completion of AS4051 and approval of the Dean of Humanities during Spring Administrative Adjustment. Juniors may not request this course until Spring Administrative Adjustment.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One English credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods and a lab OR two 100-min. evening periods

    EN4233 Latin American Studies III

    This course examines modern-day Latin America with a special emphasis on its long, complex relationship with the U.S. Although the time span of the course is largely focused on the aftermath of the Cold War to the present day, some analysis is given to the early encounters and assumptions formed largely in the nineteenth century that created the foundation for relations between Latin America and its neighbors to the North. Students examine topics such as the devastating effects of the Cold War/Proxy wars in Latin America, the development of different cultures throughout the region, environmental concerns and crises affecting the resources and environment of Central and South America, the influx of Hispanic immigrants into North America, the development of Latino identity, the impact of the drug wars on all parts of the Americas, and new roles for Latin Americans in the twenty-first century. Texts for this course include modern periodicals and media, current analyses of the political, economic and cultural events of Latin America, as well as reports and materials on Hispanic and Latino life and culture in North America. Students participate in a research project/presentation investigating a current issue in Latin American life and culture.

  •      EN4234

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of AS4051/AS4052 American Studies I/II and OR completion of AS4051 and approval of the Dean of Humanities during Spring Administrative Adjustment. Juniors may not request this course until Spring Administrative Adjustment.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One English credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods and a lab OR two 100-min. evening periods

    EN4234 Latin American Literature and Culture

    This survey course explores Latin American fiction in the 20th and 21st centuries, with excursions into memoir, essay, and poetry. Writers of the Latin American “Boom” of the 1960s and 70s such as Gabriel Garcia Marquez and Julio Cortazar will be studied alongside authors such as Uruguayan short story writer Horacio Quiroga, Argentinian purveyor of enigmatic fictions Jorge Luis Borges, and protean Brazilian writer Clarice Lispector, whose short fiction and novels are at the moment finding a large audience in North America. In Latin America, literature and politics are hardly strangers; we will particularly examine the influence and representations of one political event—the Chilean coup d’etat in 1973, which was experienced firsthand by Ariel Dorfman and Roberto Bolaño, writers whose accounts of the event we will compare. Students will read, research, and write about contemporary authors such as Valeria Luiselli and César Aira, and we will debate the usefulness of terms associated with Modern Latin American literature (e.g. “magical realism”). Much of the literature we read in this class is highly original and experimental, sometimes wildly so. Developing the skills and confidence required to read, think about, discuss, and make sense of complex and rich texts are central concerns of this class.

  •      EN4241

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of AS4051/AS4052 American Studies I/II or AS4051W/AS4052W Writing and American Studies I/II OR completion of AS4051 or AS4051W and approval of the Registrar during Spring Administrative Adjustment. Juniors may not request this course until Spring Administrative Adjustment.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One English credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods and a lab OR two 100-min. evening periods

    EN4241 Western European Cultural Studies I

    This course begins with the idea of the individual as it emerges in the literature, philosophy religion, and art of Ancient Greece, Rome, and Late Antiquity. It continues with ideas about identity in medieval Christendom, and traces the emergence of national literatures, new forms of architecture, and the first nation-states in the High Middle Ages and early Renaissance. It ends with Dante’s Inferno and with Petrarch, the poet whose preoccupation with his own celebrity points the way to the humanism of the Renaissance and the concept of self-fashioning that is the hallmark of modernity. We see the Greeks invent history as an entity distinct from both myth and chronicle, and learn how ideas about history evolve along with ideas about the self, that mysterious and vexing entity that is still our preoccupation today. Throughout the term, we read forward and backward in the Western tradition, exploring both contemporary and historical debates about the nature of history, personal identity, and the uses of literature and art, not only in ancient and medieval writers, but in modern thinkers from Marx to Nietzsche, Adorno, Althusser, and Deleuze. We delve into Homer’s epic accounts of the Trojan War and its aftermath. We see the epic transformed by the Roman poet Virgil, and the metamorphosis of the epic into an individual drama of salvation in Dante. We read tragedies by Euripides where individuals engineer disasters from which no recovery is possible, and we discuss Plato's quest for the ideal education, ideal love, and the ideal society. In political theory, we read Aristotle's analysis of political communities and the good life, and Marsilius of Padua’s medieval treatise on the direct descent of political power from God to human beings. In history, we not only read Thucydides' tragic history of the fate of the Athenians in the Peloponnesian War, we also encounter the Enlightenment ideal of writing scientific history and those who question whether that is possible or even desirable. We look at the cityscapes of Alexander’s empire, and we see how they became the model for Rome and its imitators. We read the first autobiography, written by St. Augustine in the fourth century, and the first Christian theory of history, which is also by Augustine. Throughout the course, we ask questions about the uniqueness of Western man's continuing fascination with the life of the mind and reason, and we think about why the idea of the alienated individual develops as it does in the West. In the process, we make connections between long-vanished worlds and our time. Grades are based on a series of essays, as students discuss and write their way to knowledge.

  •      EN4242

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of AS4051/AS4052 American Studies I/II and OR completion of AS4051 and approval of the Dean of Humanities during Spring Administrative Adjustment. Juniors may not request this course until Spring Administrative Adjustment.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One English credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods and a lab OR two 100-min. evening periods

    EN4242 Western European Cultural Studies II

    This course explores the emergence of the modern world, the modern self, and the modern state, along with revolutions in politics, literature, philosophy, and the visual arts that lead to a culture of alienation in which individual selves increasingly feel themselves to be alone, even in the midst of oceans of humanity in cities of dizzying size. We begin with phenomenon of self-fashioning, not only in characters like Marlowe’s Dr. Faustus, who barters his soul for knowledge, or Shakespeare’s Hamlet, who finds himself imprisoned in the private spaces of his mind, but with self-fashioning in religion with the Reformations of the sixteenth century and in revolutionary changes in the visual arts and architecture. Readings from Montaigne, Galileo, and others point the way toward a subjectively constituted, demystified world. Topics include the emergence of secular philosophy in Descartes and Locke; the origins of modern theories of the social contract in Hobbes, Locke, and Rousseau; and Romanticism, with its emphasis on the world of feeling. We encounter the alienating world of industrial culture, and new theories about nature and history in Marx and Darwin. We examine Modernism in all its forms—in psychology, in narrative, in the visual arts and architecture, in social planning, and in cinema. We also examine the impact of world wars, globalism, the newest versions of cultural imperialism, and the modern world's obsessions with self and self-revelation, and the attendant culture of celebrity. Readings include Rousseau, the English Romantics, Darwin, Marx, Kierkegaard, Baudelaire, Nietzsche, Freud, Thomas Mann, Heidegger, Virginia Woolf, and Samuel Beckett as well as contemporary writers as various as Patti Smith and Donna Tartt. Grades are based on a series of essays and on class participation. In WECS, we use the essay as a tool of thought as we write and discuss our way to knowledge.

  •      EN4251

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of AS4051/AS4052 American Studies I/II and OR completion of AS4051 and approval of the Dean of Humanities during Spring Administrative Adjustment. Juniors may not request this course until Spring Administrative Adjustment.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One English credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods and a lab OR two 100-min. evening periods

    EN4251 Western Civilizations I: Wisdom, Revelation, Reason, and Doubt

    This interdisciplinary course explores Western societies from the ancient world to the Early Middle Ages. Through examining texts and cultural artifacts, students discuss the history, literature, philosophy, art, and cultures of the ancient Mesopotamians, Hebrews, Greeks, Romans, early Christians, and Europeans of the Middle Ages. Readings include The Epic of Gilgamesh, the Old and New Testaments, Beowulf, and works by Homer, Aristophanes, Thucydides, Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, Virgil, and St. Augustine. Guiding questions for the course include: How have people organized their societies and why? How has religion shaped their lives? How do they define the individual? What are their ethical and moral systems? What is the role of the arts in each culture? What is the relationship between the public and the private spheres? How have people defined themselves in relationship to nature? What are the lasting influences of these societies on the modern world? The course develops students' skills in writing, critical thinking, research, and public speaking.

  •      EN4252

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of AS4051/AS4052 American Studies I/II or AS4051W/AS4052W Writing and American Studies I/II OR completion of AS4051 or AS4051W and approval of the Registrar during Spring Administrative Adjustment. Juniors may not request this course until Spring Administrative Adjustment.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One English credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods and a lab OR two 100-min. evening periods

    EN4252 Western Civilizations II: Wisdom, Revelation, Reason, and Doubt

    This interdisciplinary course explores modern Europe from the late eighteenth century to the present. Through examining history, literature, philosophy, art, and culture, students discuss the French Revolution, Romanticism, the Industrial Revolution, Imperialism, Modernism, Communism, Feminism, World Wars I and II, the Cold War, Existentialism, Post-Modernism, Globalization, and the European Union. Readings include works by Rousseau, Mill, Marx, Jane Austen, Tolstoy, Nietzsche, Freud, Sartre, Virginia Woolf, and Tom Stoppard. Guiding questions for the course include: How have people organized their societies and why? How has religion shaped their lives? How do they define the individual? What are their ethical and moral systems? What is the role of the arts in each culture? What is the relationship between the public and the private spheres? How have people defined themselves in relationship to nature? What are the lasting influences of these events and ideas on the world today? The course develops students' skills in reading, writing, critical thinking, research, and public speaking.

  •      EN4300

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of AS4051/AS4052 American Studies I/II and OR completion of AS4051 and approval of the Dean of Humanities during Spring Administrative Adjustment. Juniors may not request this course until Spring Administrative Adjustment.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One English credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week and a lab,Three periods and a lab OR two 100-min. evening periods

    EN4300 Creative Writing

    NOTE: Beginning in the 2022-2023 academic year, this course meets a senior English graduation requirement. Students who took EN4000 Creative Writing in 2021-2022 are not eligible to request or enroll in this course.

    This is a course for students who get excited about language, who feel compelled to copy down poems and song lyrics in the pages of their journal, who find language the most natural form of expression. In this introduction to the composition and reading of creative writing, students will build a solid foundation for the craft of writing in multiple genres. To learn about the current field, students discuss a wide range of contemporary creative writing by “reading like a writer”—gleaning writing lessons from mentor texts and practicing those lessons in their own work. In addition to reading creative works, students ponder theoretical and historical questions of creative writing: How does cultural bias impact what readers consider ‘good writing’? How do genre conventions evolve, and what does it mean to work outside traditional genres? Students work individually on assignments, discuss readings as a class, and collaborate with peers in workshops where burgeoning writers encounter an affirming and constructive audience for their work. Assignments focus on developing the tools for writing in many genres and styles, along with developing the habits to enable the generation of ideas, the ability to trust intuition, the construction of narrative and image, and the process of revision. To give back to the writer’s community, students may also write book reviews or conduct interviews with authors. A final project, either a portfolio or longer work, is accompanied by a critical reflection that asks students to identify their influences and aesthetics. By the end of this course, students will have both a polished portfolio of their best work and the skills to engage deeply in a creative process that results in powerful writing.

  •      EN4310

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of AS4051/AS4052 American Studies I/II and OR completion of AS4051 and approval of the Dean of Humanities during Spring Administrative Adjustment. Juniors may not request this course until Spring Administrative Adjustment.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One English credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods and a lab OR two 100-min. evening periods

    EN4310 Contemporary African-American Literature

    In 2011, Ken Warren declared that "African-American literature" was dead, arguing that its usefulness only extended as a response to Jim Crow and was, for all intents and purposes, no longer necessary. This course in contemporary African-American literature, inherently a diasporic study, explores this question as an exclusive study of African-American literature and literary critique. This body of literature, marked by the first Black presidency as well as the Black Lives Matter movement, offers a rich canon of texts that grapple with the meaning of Black life and Black artistic production in the late 20th- and 21st-century context. The course asks students to participate in literary analyses and engage with major theoretical frameworks including, but not limited to, Black Feminism, Neo-Colonialism, and Afro-Futurism. In addition, students consider the historical, social, and political processes that impact the literature they read. Activities include in-class presentations, video essays, and analytical writing assignments.

  •      EN4320

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of AS4051/AS4052 American Studies I/II and OR completion of AS4051 and approval of the Dean of Humanities during Spring Administrative Adjustment. Juniors may not request this course until Spring Administrative Adjustment.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One English credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods and a lab OR two 100-min. evening periods

    EN4320 Women's Literature across the Globe

    In A Room of One’s Own, after realizing that there was nothing known about women or women writers before the eighteenth century, Virginia Woolf wrote, “Let me imagine, since the facts are so hard to come by, what would have happened had Shakespeare had a wonderfully gifted sister, called Judith, let us say.” In this course, we will continue Woolf’s efforts in understanding the struggles of women’s literature and women in literature both in the past and present. The course content covers the literatures of women globally, with a broad focus on various genres and periods, and provides literary, historical, and sociological context for women’s writing. Throughout the semester, we will engage with literature from diverse cultural backgrounds to explore the interdiscursivity of womanhood and identify connections between movements for women’s rights. Our conversations will include themes such as the origins of women’s writing, literary traditions, the history of subordination, the clash of cultural identities and womanhood, the dynamics of gendered oppression, transgenerational relations of women, trauma narratives and narrative strategies, and social class issues. To unfold the women’s history of ideas and literatures, we will read both theoretical and creative works by authors, such as Sappho, Lady Murasaki, Virginia Woolf, Anna Julia Cooper, Zabel Yessayan, Simone de Beauvoir, bell hooks, Fatima Mernissi, Urmila Pawar, Elif Shafak, and others. Students will demonstrate what they learn through interpretive writing assignments and creative projects. The course will also include presentations and online discussion forums. 

  •      EN4330

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of AS4051/AS4052 American Studies I/II and OR completion of AS4051 and approval of the Dean of Humanities during Spring Administrative Adjustment. Juniors may not request this course until Spring Administrative Adjustment.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One English credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods and a lab OR two 100-min. evening periods

    EN4330: Ecocriticism

    In her 2010 poem, "What Can I Say," Mary Oliver wrote, “Take your busy heart to the art museum and the / chamber of commerce / but take it also to the forest.” Five years later, Oxford University Press removed from its Junior Dictionary 50 words related to nature. Words such as “acorn," “clover,” and “heron” were replaced by “blog," “broadband," and “cut and paste." In our precarious time of climate change, disconnection from nature, and environmental violence, perhaps we should all contemplate and be in forests more, so that we may consider the power of an acorn. Using literary and historical texts as the primary guides, this course will explore a variety of relationships between humans and the natural world. Students will engage with poems, essays, novels, and other primary and secondary texts to consider how we conceive, construct, and fulfill our relationships to the natural world and how heritage and culture impact humans' relationships with the environment. We will also explore the history and politics of environmental protection and sustainability within several crucial frames, including those of race, class, and gender. We will examine impacts of colonization on land management policies and the reemergence of Indigenous practices with land, water, and food systems management. The course will include regular experiential learning opportunities in nearby natural spaces.

  •      EN4400

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of AS4051/AS4052 American Studies I/II and OR completion of AS4051 and approval of the Dean of Humanities during Spring Administrative Adjustment. Juniors may not request this course until Spring Administrative Adjustment.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One English credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods and a lab OR two 100-min. evening periods

    EN4400 AI in Science Fiction

    Science fiction doesn’t predict the future, but it can help shape it. Good science fiction, in the words of Philip K. Dick, takes a new idea and makes it “intellectually stimulating to the reader. . . . It unlocks the reader’s mind so that that mind, like the author’s, begins to create. Thus science fiction is creative and it inspires creativity.” In this course, we will follow a series of writers and filmmakers as they attempt to unlock our minds and open them to the potentialities and problems of artificial general intelligence. As scientists around the world work to enhance machine learning capabilities and as figures ranging from Elon Musk to Henry Kissinger warn of the dangers of AI, this course will look to science fiction as a laboratory of ideas, one in which creative minds ask us to consider a number of different ways that AI is and could transform our society. Students will thus be asked, and generate their own answers to, a variety of questions that will accompany the development of general intelligence. Such questions include: How will researchers know when they have actually created a general intelligence? Will it be sentient? If so, what rules and laws should govern our treatment of AI, or AI’s treatment of humanity? What’s the difference between a human and algorithm trained to perfectly mimic that human’s speech patterns? Can AI make art? And do androids dream of electric sheep? In this class, we will explore the answers our most imaginative artists have come up with to those questions.

  •      EN4410

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of AS4051/AS4052 American Studies I/II and OR completion of AS4051 and approval of the Dean of Humanities during Spring Administrative Adjustment. Juniors may not request this course until Spring Administrative Adjustment.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One English credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods and a lab OR two 100-min. evening periods

    EN4410 British Literature and Culture

    This course explores selected works from Britain’s rich literary history, including works by Shakespeare, Milton, the Romantic poets, Mary Shelley, Jane Austen, Virginia Woolf, James Joyce, and Samuel Beckett (among other visual artists, filmmakers, and musicians). These readings will allow us to think about how changing perceptions of the self, history, truth, women, sexuality, politics, social existence, and the natural world are registered in artworks spanning from the Renaissance to the twentieth century. Our course begins with an emphasis on Shakespeare’s major comedies and tragedies, and from here we consider how Shakespeare’s innovative approach for representing human nature was adapted and transformed by the artists who succeeded him. We pay special attention throughout the course to selected historical and social developments throughout British history and how they influenced (and were influenced by) the arts: the development of Renaissance humanism, the rise of Enlightenment rationalism, and the transformation of Britain into a modern, industrialized nation are a few of the trends that we study in parallel with the arts.

  •      EN4420

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of AS4051/AS4052 American Studies I/II and OR completion of AS4051 and approval of the Dean of Humanities during Spring Administrative Adjustment. Juniors may not request this course until Spring Administrative Adjustment.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One English credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods and a lab OR two 100-min. evening periods

    EN4420 Classical Myth: Epic and Tragedy

    The creation of the world. The rise of Zeus. The birth of Athena. The abduction of Persephone. The fall of Troy. The wanderings and homecoming of Odysseus. For nearly three thousand years, these stories of gods and mortals have gripped the imaginations of listeners and readers. In this course, we explore major myths of the ancient Greeks and Romans, with a special emphasis on how these oral tales were committed to writing in epic poems and tragic plays. Throughout the course, we seek to understand these myths in the geographical, historical, and cultural contexts in which they were created. We read ancient Greek and Roman texts in English translation, including works by Homer, Hesiod, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Vergil, and Ovid. Ancient works of art and architecture, including vase paintings and sculpture, form a rich complement to these written sources. We also explore major theories of myth interpretation—from approaches taken by the ancient Greeks themselves to those developed by modern-day theorists—and apply these theories to the myths we encounter. Finally, we explore how later artists, writers, and filmmakers have appropriated, interpreted, and transformed these ancient stories into new forms—often for very different purposes than those served by the myths in the ancient world. Although most of the assessments are essay-based, we also take these ancient myths into our own imaginations in a deep and powerful way and transform them into our own original creations—poems, narratives, dramatic scenes, visual art, and other forms. Our journey together culminates in a public performance of these metamorphoses.

  •      EN4430

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of AS4051/AS4052 American Studies I/II and OR completion of AS4051 and approval of the Dean of Humanities during Spring Administrative Adjustment. Juniors may not request this course until Spring Administrative Adjustment.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One English credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods and a lab OR two 100-min. evening periods

    EN4430 Modern World Fiction

    Beginning with experimental novels of the late nineteenth-century and focusing on French, Spanish, German, Czech, English, American, Cuban, Colombian, African, and Japanese writers, this comparative literature course examines the extraordinary flowering of twentieth-century fiction—with its open-ended form and experimental styles—against a backdrop of what Stephen Kern has called a transformed “culture of time and space.” In our effort to understand this rich body of literature, we explore the relationships between movements in philosophy and the visual arts—including photography and film—and the changing shapes of fiction. Readings may include short stories by Jorge Luis Borges and Michel Tournier; novels such as Conrad's Heart of Darkness, Bram Stoker's Dracula, Osamu Dazai's No Longer Human, Milan Kundera's The Unbearable Lightness of Being, Faulkner's The Sound and the Fury, Alejo Carpentier's The Kingdom of This World, Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway, Miguel de Unamuno's San Manuel Bueno, Mártir, Kafka's Metamorphosis, Gide's The Immoralist, Gabriel García Márquez's One Hundred Years of Solitude, and Donna Tartt's Secret History. Through a series of analytical essays, students explore questions about authors and their audiences and the relationship between literary texts and contexts. In the process, students strengthen their own voices and explore the connections between literary and cultural identity.

  •      EN4440

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of AS4051/AS4052 American Studies I/II and OR completion of AS4051 and approval of the Dean of Humanities during Spring Administrative Adjustment. Juniors may not request this course until Spring Administrative Adjustment.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One English credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods and a lab OR two 100-min. evening periods

    EN4440 Philosophy and Literature in the Twentieth Century

    This course explores twentieth-century philosophy, literature, the visual arts, and the thematic ties that bind them together. After the mid-1840s, in both texts and images, painters, literary artists, and philosophers increasingly present the self as inherently unstable, reality as a construction, history as a fiction, and the universe as random and chaotic. We read Kierkegaard, who believed that escape from despair lay in taking a “leap” into an “absolute beginning,” and Nietzsche, who embraced an ecstatic vision of the self as a product of will and desire. Heidegger, Sartre, Althusser, Baudrillard, and Deleuze provide other perspectives on the self as a freely constructed project. In painting, we trace the retreat from the Real in artists like Picasso and Matisse, and the longing to reveal the extraordinary in the ordinary in Magritte—a desire that is pervasive in the novels of Virginia Woolf. Literary texts may include Emily Brontë's Wuthering Heights, Paul Bowles's The Sheltering Sky, Marguerite Duras' Hiroshima Mon Amour, Milan Kundera's The Unbearable Lightness of Being, and Samuel Beckett's Company, along with readings in Sartre, Woolf, Dostoevsky, Thomas Mann, Gertrude Stein, and Donna Tartt. Films include Ingmar Bergman's Kierkegaardian Winter Light and Woody Allen's Dostoevskian Crimes and Misdemeanors. Classes are conducted as seminars, with group discussions, background lectures, and presentations. Grades are based on a series of comparative essays and on class participation.

  •      EN4450

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of AS4051/AS4052 American Studies I/II and OR completion of AS4051 and approval of the Dean of Humanities during Spring Administrative Adjustment. Juniors may not request this course until Spring Administrative Adjustment.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One English credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods and a lab OR two 100-min. evening periods

    EN4450 Shakespeare Now

    Few playwrights' bodies of work persist in production as dependably as that of William Shakespeare, the Elizabethan bard who, as his contemporary Ben Jonson eulogized, “was not of an age, but for all time.” Yet today these plays are as likely to elude as illuminate—at times accomplishing both in the same breath. We'll turn many a page and roll film as we seek to more deeply understand these texts not only in their historical contexts but in light of modern adaptation and staging concerns for film and theater. Class discussion and substantial writing opportunities seek to bridge close analytical readings and broader contextual understandings of these plays in period, at present, and points between. Creative projects and presentations offer students the chance to learn in process and “suffer the slings and arrows” of rendering these works to engage an audience. As we hold the proverbial “mirror up to nature,” what will these plays say to us now, and perhaps more importantly, what will that say about who we are?

  •      EN4460

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of AS4051/AS4052 American Studies I/II and OR completion of AS4051 and approval of the Dean of Humanities during Spring Administrative Adjustment. Juniors may not request this course until Spring Administrative Adjustment.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One English credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods and a lab OR two 100-min. evening periods

    EN4460 Southern Studies

    This course in Southern Studies introduces the literature, history, and culture of the American South up to the present day. The notion of “the South” has a peculiar function in the United States’s national literary and cultural traditions, from an identifier of some of the most important literary works of the 20th century to serving as the place par excellence to think questions of progress and backwardness, equality and injustice, good and evil. On our way to understanding what it is that makes a work “Southern” besides a map and a birth certificate, we investigate an array of aspects of Southern literature and culture, both “high culture” and “low culture.” Through a combination of study of the work of major Southern novelists, short-story writers, and poets (e.g., William Faulkner, Flannery O’Connor, Alice Walker, Natasha Trethewey, Walker Percy, Allen Tate, Robert Penn Warren, Cormac McCarthy), as well as key cultural features that are taken to be crucial to the South (including memory, food, music, and religion), we discuss the ways place, race, class, gender, and sexuality refract our ideas of what it means for a person or a work to be “Southern.” We also address the questions of whether and how “the South” continues to be, if it ever was, a useful or coherent concept—particularly regarding claims of uniqueness.

  •      EN4470

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of AS4051/AS4052 American Studies I/II and OR completion of AS4051 and approval of the Dean of Humanities during Spring Administrative Adjustment. Juniors may not request this course until Spring Administrative Adjustment.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One English credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods and a lab OR two 100-min. evening periods

    EN4470 STEM and the Stage

    If “it's wanting to know that makes us matter,” as Tom Stoppard suggests in Arcadia, then it's little wonder that the endeavors of STEM fields to understand the mysteries of our universe have proven such fertile ground for dramatists. In this page-to-stage course, we examine how theatrical art wrestles with the implications and repercussions of STEM discoveries to explore larger questions of our humanity, purpose, and meaning. In addition to plays that include Life of Galileo, Copenhagen, and Arcadia, we consider a range of historical, literary, and scholarly texts that inform and contextualize these works. Through close reading, we strengthen our communication skills by analyzing and critiquing the way an author orients a lay audience to complex STEM concepts and connects them to larger thematic ideas. In a broader sense, our chief concern is to investigate how the efforts of science, mathematics, and the humanities to explain our world intersect, inform, and challenge one another—how in mapping the stars, we might also map our hearts and minds. Creative, stage-related projects and formal academic writing assignments provide substantial opportunities for students to experiment with their own ideas and demonstrate their learning throughout the course.

  •      EN4481

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of AS4051/AS4052 American Studies I/II and OR completion of AS4051 and approval of the Dean of Humanities during Spring Administrative Adjustment. Juniors may not request this course until Spring Administrative Adjustment.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One English credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods and a lab OR two 100-min. evening periods

    EN4481 Topics in Literature I

    Students in this introductory course will begin by challenging the course’s title: there is no such thing as a Native American. This is not to say that the land that is now referred to as North America was empty when European settler-colonials arrived.  Rather, it means that Indigenous peoples inhabiting this land refer to themselves using names such as Cherokee, Mvscogee, Pequot, Potawatomie, Kiowa, Diné, and many others. As this diversity of traditions shows, when we read what might be called Native American or Indigenous texts, we must hold ourselves accountable to the challenges of approaching numerous worldviews and diverse histories that were made invisible or purposefully erased by settler-colonialism.

    Students in this course will challenge the long history of American literary, historical, and popular texts that perpetuate notions of monolithic “Indian-ness” or dehumanizing stereotypes of “noble savages” from a “vanishing race.”  We will look at how "Indian-ness" is constructed and mediated in mainstream culture, as well as at the strategies indigenous peoples use to challenge these damaging constructions.  We will study how people of various indigenous nations build communities and define ideas of national sovereignty, reciprocity, and responsibility. As we discuss, analyze, and write about poetry, film, autobiography, fiction, television, and photography, we will work to understand that the people who created our course texts are anchored in diverse worldviews and histories.

  •      EN4482

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of AS4051/AS4052 American Studies I/II and OR completion of AS4051 and approval of the Dean of Humanities during Spring Administrative Adjustment. Juniors may not request this course until Spring Administrative Adjustment.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One English credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week OR two 100-min. evening periods

    EN4482 Topics in Literature II

    This course seeks to create a genealogy of the American West through the historical study of selected nineteenth-century American literary and visual texts. The selection is at once the problem and the occasion of our study, for even as these narratives and images give us the landscape, plots, and characters of a familiar “west,” so they occlude a more comprehensive and diverse historical, cultural, and social terrain. In this course, we shall be as interested in the latter as in the former, seeking both to understand the construction of an American West and to discover territories of difference in the counter-narratives of places and peoples otherwise relegated to the margins of national myth. Our texts include novels, popular fiction such as storybook publications and dime novels, short stories, paintings, photography, histories, treaties, and political and legal writing.

  •      EN4483

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of AS4051/AS4052 American Studies I/II and OR completion of AS4051 and approval of the Dean of Humanities during Spring Administrative Adjustment. Juniors may not request this course until Spring Administrative Adjustment.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One English credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods and a lab OR two 100-min. evening periods

    EN4483 Topics in Literature III

    This comparative literature course focuses on a selected period, genre, movement, author, or literary theme. Students examine authors and audiences, texts and contexts, and their intellectual milieu. Through writing a series of commentaries and academic essays, students claim intellectual ownership of what they have learned. The focus, whenever the course is offered, varies and is announced when course offerings are published.

    2023-24:  Asian American Studies

  •      EN4484

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of AS4051/AS4052 American Studies I/II and OR completion of AS4051 and approval of the Dean of Humanities during Spring Administrative Adjustment. Juniors may not request this course until Spring Administrative Adjustment.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One English credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods and a lab OR two 100-min. evening periods

    EN4484 Topics in Literature IV

    This comparative literature course focuses on a selected period, genre, movement, author, or literary theme. Students examine authors and audiences, texts and contexts, and their intellectual milieu. Through writing a series of commentaries and academic essays, students claim intellectual ownership of what they have learned. The focus, whenever the course is offered, varies and is announced when course offerings are published.

  •      EN4600

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of AS4051 American Studies I
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One English credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods and a lab OR two 100-min. evening periods

    EN4600 Research Experience in the Humanities

    This interdisciplinary course introduces students to the rigorous pleasures of research in the humanities. Through work in and out of class, including visits by guest lecturers and trips to local archives and museums, students learn the basic skills of research, including the identification of a compelling intellectual interest and the transformation of that interest into a question that at once requires and excites research of the highest quality. Students then answer this question, in a provisional way, by work that leads first to the statement of a thesis (the answer to the question), then to the initial development of that statement in a shorter paper of ten to twelve pages. Successful completion of the course may also lead to summer research, internships, or apprenticeships with local scholars. Following this course, optional enrollment in EN4610 Research in the Humanities offers selected students the opportunity for more substantial work in their chosen fields of scholarship.

  •      EN4610

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of EN4600, AS4051/AS4052 American Studies I/II or Summer Research in the Humanities with the Dean's approval.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One English credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods and a lab OR two 100-min. evening periods

    EN4610 Research in the Humanities

    Research in Humanities encourages writing and reading that is at once critical and necessarily creative, for by these acts of interdisciplinary scholarship, students seek to construct new objects of knowledge—a knowledge commensurate with their experience of the world, informed and indeed altered by the works and words of others. This course is necessarily interdisciplinary, because it is, among other things, a critique of the division of labor within institutions of knowledge. In other words, even as it seeks to understand how disciplines such as anthropology, psychology, sociology, political science, economics, and literature constitute their objects of study (the human, the mind, society, etc.), it also attends carefully to the limits of disciplinary formation, to the ways in which the “human” or “nature” escape the classificatory systems within which they are defined and to which they are confined. Research in Humanities is organized around theories and practices of research in the humanities and the sciences. The study of theory is necessary because these researches should be critical and historical, interrogating both their subject’s conditions of possibility and the contemporary situation of their study. Each week, members of the seminar will consider different theoretical approaches to reading and writing about diverse texts. These approaches include, but are not limited to, political criticism, cultural and ethnic studies, feminism, gender and sexuality, historicism, and colonial and post-colonial critique. As for practice, students will learn how to conduct research and how to construct an effective thesis statement that will govern an argument developed and sustained throughout a paper of twenty- to twenty-five pages. The proper use of evidence, as well as considerations of evidentiary significance, will also be fundamental to the course’s concerns. Students will then transform their research into articles for scholarly publication, including Fifth World, NCSSM’s journal of interdisciplinary research in the humanities. They will serve on the editorial board for Fifth World, evaluating submissions, offering suggestions for revisions, and ensuring the timely delivery of the completed journal to the publisher.

  •      FR3051

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week

    FR3051 Journeys into French I

    Students embark on a journey of linguistic and cultural exploration as they take the first steps toward becoming proficient in French. This course is for students who have not studied French before or who have appropriate NCSSM placement. Students learn to negotiate meaning among individuals, interpret written and spoken meaning, and to present meaning via oral and written messages in the present tense that focus on some of the following themes: formal and informal greetings, time, self, family, friends and hobbies, school and schedule, places and activities in the city, and ordering food and drink. Cultural aspects of the French-speaking world are interwoven throughout the course. Web-based exercises, videos, songs and short readings aid students in their acquisition of grammatical concepts, new vocabulary, and listening skills.

  •      FR3052

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): FR3051 or permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week

    FR3052 Journeys into French II

    Students continue their early steps toward becoming proficient in French. This course is for students who have had limited previous exposure to French or who have appropriate NCSSM placement. Students learn to negotiate meaning among individuals, interpret written and spoken meaning, and to present meaning via oral and written messages in the present tense that focus on some of the following themes: parties, holidays, and celebrations, chores and tasks in the house, parts of the house, clothing and sizing, vacation plans, means of travel, and making reservations. Students also learn to address the same themes within a limited introduction to the past tense. Cultural aspects of the French-speaking world are interwoven throughout the course. Web-based exercises, videos, songs and short readings aid students in their acquisition of grammatical concepts, new vocabulary, and listening skills.

  •      FR3651

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): FR3052 or permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week

    FR3651 Navigating in French I

    Students continue to navigate their linguistic and cultural journeys in French. Students begin to read short narratives and comprehend a wider array of media produced in French. Students also begin to develop an understanding of nuances of the language. Students learn to negotiate meaning among individuals, interpret written and spoken meaning, and to present meaning via oral and written messages in present, preterite and imperfect tenses. Students further increase their proficiency in the language by reading short texts, viewing video programs, and using the language in everyday conversational situations that focus on themes such as French cuisine, food categories, daily routines, and health and illness. Students continue to explore cultural aspects of the French-speaking world. Students have access to web-based exercises and tutorials, video activities, individual and group projects, as well as film and documentaries, to aid them in the acquisition of grammatical concepts and new vocabulary.

  •      FR3652

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): FR3651 or permission of the Dean of Humanities
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week

    FR3652 Navigating in French II

    Students continue to navigate their linguistic and cultural journeys in French. Students continue to read short narratives and to comprehend a wider array of media produced in French. Students also continue to develop an understanding of nuances of the language. Students learn to negotiate meaning among individuals, interpret written and spoken meaning, and to present meaning via oral and written messages in all tenses previously learned, including the future, and conditional and subjunctive moods. Students further increase their proficiency in the language by reading short texts, viewing video programs, and using the language in everyday conversational situations that focus on themes such as technology and computers, doing business in the city, objects in the workplace, professions and their functions in the community, and the environment. Students continue to explore cultural aspects of the French-speaking world. Students have access to web-based exercises and tutorials, video activities, individual and group projects, as well as film and documentaries, to aid them in the acquisition of grammatical concepts and new vocabulary.

  •      FR4051

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): FR3652 or permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week and a lab

    FR4051 Advanced French for Global Applications

    In this course, the exploration into language continues but expands to encompass elements that reflect the breadth and depth of the francophone world: the primary focus is culture, history, society, and literature of various French-speaking peoples. Through a rich program of original short films, audio activities, cultural readings, authentic literary selections, and a full-length short story, students improve their understanding of spoken French and develop their speaking, reading, and writing skills. Classroom activities emphasize communication, allowing students to interact and apply what they are learning. An accompanying web-based program provides additional language exercises to reinforce and enhance grammatical structures learned in previous courses. Students will become familiar with most grammatical structures and will learn to apply them in speaking and writing. The course content is theme-focused and speaks to current as well as perennial issues, such as values and beliefs, family dynamics and trends, gender, poverty, issues of immigration and assimilation, and problems of decolonization in francophone countries. These topics inform class discussions, skits, debates, oral presentations, and serve as the basis for writing in French. Students will begin the course by writing one-page personal reflections and, by the end of the term, advance to completing multi-page analytical, research-based essays.

  •      FR4052

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): FR4051 or permission of the Dean of Humanities
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week and a lab

    FR4052 Advanced French for Global Applications II

    In this course, the exploration into language continues but expands to encompass elements that reflect the breadth and depth of the francophone world: the primary focus is culture, history, society, and literature of various French-speaking peoples. Through a rich program of original short films, audio activities, cultural readings, authentic full length stories and plays, students improve their understanding of spoken French and further develop their speaking, reading, and writing skills. Classroom activities emphasize communication, allowing students to interact and apply what they are learning. An accompanying web-based program provides additional language exercises to reinforce and enhance grammatical structures learned in previous courses. Students will become familiar with most grammatical structures and will apply them in speaking and writing. The course content is theme-focused and speaks to current as well as perennial issues, such as race and gender, the role of science, technology and media, and environmental issues in francophone culture and society. These topics inform class discussions, skits, debates, oral presentations, and serve as the basis for writing in French. Students will practice their writing skills in a variety of ways, including short blog entries, reflections, and analytical essays.

  •      FR4151

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): FR3052, placement, or permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week

    FR4151 Navigating in French I

    Students continue to navigate their linguistic and cultural journeys in French. Students begin to read short narratives and comprehend a wider array of media produced in French. Students also begin to develop an understanding of nuances of the language. Students learn to negotiate meaning among individuals, interpret written and spoken meaning, and to present meaning via oral and written messages in present, preterite and imperfect tenses. Students further increase their proficiency in the language by reading short texts, viewing video programs, and using the language in everyday conversational situations that focus on themes such as French cuisine, food categories, daily routines, and health and illness. Students continue to explore cultural aspects of the French-speaking world. Students have access to web-based exercises and tutorials, video activities, individual and group projects, as well as film and documentaries, to aid them in the acquisition of grammatical concepts and new vocabulary.

  •      FR4152

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): FR4151 or permission of the Dean of Humanities
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week

    FR4152 Navigating in French II

    Students continue to navigate their linguistic and cultural journeys in French. Students continue to read short narratives and to comprehend a wider array of media produced in French. Students also continue to develop an understanding of nuances of the language. Students learn to negotiate meaning among individuals, interpret written and spoken meaning, and to present meaning via oral and written messages in all tenses previously learned, including the future, and conditional and subjunctive moods. Students further increase their proficiency in the language by reading short texts, viewing video programs, and using the language in everyday conversational situations that focus on themes such as technology and computers, doing business in the city, objects in the workplace, professions and their functions in the community, and the environment. Students continue to explore cultural aspects of the French-speaking world. Students have access to web-based exercises and tutorials, video activities, individual and group projects, as well as film and documentaries, to aid them in the acquisition of grammatical concepts and new vocabulary.

  •      FR4300

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Prerequisite(s): FR4152, placement, or permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Two periods per week and a lab

    FR4300 Advanced French for Global Applications

    In this course, the exploration into language continues but expands to encompass elements that reflect the breadth and depth of the francophone world: the primary focus is culture, history, society, and literature of various French-speaking peoples. Through a rich program of original short films, audio activities, cultural readings, authentic literary selections, and a full-length short story, students improve their understanding of spoken French and develop their speaking, reading, and writing skills. Classroom activities emphasize communication, allowing students to interact and apply what they are learning. An accompanying web-based program provides additional language exercises to reinforce and enhance grammatical structures learned in previous courses. Students will become familiar with most grammatical structures and will learn to apply them in speaking and writing. The course content is theme-focused and speaks to current as well as perennial issues, such as values and beliefs, family dynamics and trends, gender, poverty, issues of immigration and assimilation, and problems of decolonization in francophone countries. These topics inform class discussions, skits, debates, oral presentations, and serve as the basis for writing in French. Students will begin the course by writing one-page personal reflections and, by the end of the term, advance to completing multi-page analytical, research-based essays.

  •      FR4510

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Prerequisite(s): FR4300, placement, or permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week and a lab

    FR4510 Modern French Readings and Media

    Another important aspect of French is its major influence on modernist and post-modernist thought, literature, and art. In this course, students read, analyze, and discuss in French short stories, plays, poetry, and essays in conjunction with study of the fine arts, film, TV, and advertising to gain a deeper understanding of modern French and francophone cultures. Through the study of different media, students examine popular currents such as symbolism, surrealism, and existentialism that have shaped modern thought and philosophy. Previously-studied grammatical structures are reviewed, and more advanced grammar is introduced organically as it appears in the readings. Students sharpen all four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Independent projects allow students to pursue personal interests, and class activities are enriched by visits to local museums, theater productions, and film screenings, depending on available exhibitions and shows.

  •      FR4651

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): FR4052 or permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Two periods per week and a lab

    FR4651 Modern French Readings and Media I

    Another important aspect of French is its major influence on modernist and post-modernist thought, literature, and art. In this course, students read, analyze, and discuss in French short stories, plays, poetry, and essays in conjunction with study of the fine arts, film, TV, and advertising to gain a deeper understanding of modern French and francophone cultures. Through the study of different media, students examine popular currents such as symbolism, surrealism, and existentialism that have shaped modern thought and philosophy. Previously-studied grammatical structures are reviewed, and more advanced grammar is introduced organically as it appears in the readings. Students sharpen all four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Independent projects allow students to pursue personal interests, and class activities are enriched by visits to local museums, theater productions, and film screenings, depending on available exhibitions and shows.

  •      FR4652

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): FR3652 or permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week and a lab

    FR4652 Modern French Readings and Media

    Another important aspect of French is its major influence on modernist and post-modernist thought, literature, and art. In this course, students read, analyze, and discuss in French short stories, plays, poetry, and essays in conjunction with study of the fine arts, film, TV, and advertising to gain a deeper understanding of modern French and francophone cultures. Through the study of different media, students examine popular currents such as symbolism, surrealism, and existentialism that have shaped modern thought and philosophy. Previously-studied grammatical structures are reviewed, and more advanced grammar is introduced organically as it appears in the readings. Students sharpen all four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Independent projects allow students to pursue personal interests, and class activities are enriched by visits to local museums, theater productions, and film screenings, depending on available exhibitions and shows.

  •      HU4000

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: History & Social Sciences
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One elective credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: One 100-min. evening period per week

    HU4000 Entrepreneurship

    The special function of the entrepreneur is to innovate. At the core of this course in entrepreneurship is an exploration of what it means to be innovative. Students will experience the search for “innovation opportunities” within a wide range of market spaces. Questions related to value generation, effective collaboration, design thinking, and leadership will be investigated. The element of risk will be front and center as student-entrepreneurs evaluate the complexities of moving from an idea to a sustainable and (we hope) profitable business model. Throughout the course, student teams will bring the themes and principles of entrepreneurship to life by building a business around an innovative product. Importantly, the course introduces students to successful entrepreneurs to learn from their knowledge, experience, and insights. As a culminating event, students will showcase their innovations during an entrepreneurial competition on campus. The course thus provides students with a platform for creative and innovative thinking.

  •      HU4010

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: History & Social Sciences
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Admission by application and selection.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One elective credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: One 100-min. evening period per week,One period per week

    HU4010 Applications in Entrepreneurship

    “Entrepreneurs are simply those who understand that there is little difference between obstacle and opportunity and are able to turn both to their advantage.” – Victor Kiam. This course provides the necessary background material and a structured opportunity for students with ideas for products or services to bring their ideas from conception to market through this real-life activity of entrepreneurship. A thematic focus for the products or services is announced each year. Students submit their thematically-related ideas to a proposal evaluation committee which reviews the applications and selects the student teams for that year's course. Students then learn and apply the steps involved in marketing their ideas including market analysis, business plan development, and presentation to potential investors.

  •      HU4300

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Humanities Electives
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of AS4051/AS4052 American Studies I/II and OR completion of AS4051 and approval of the Dean of Humanities during Spring Administrative Adjustment. Juniors may not request this course until Spring Administrative Adjustment.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Humanities credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week OR two 100-min. evening periods

    HU4300 Whose America? Immigrant Experiences, 1910-present

    The experiences of immigrants to this “nation of immigrants” have a profound influence on our nation’s history and on the development of what it means to be an American. Immigration patterns and policy play key roles in these experiences, However, the United States has a fraught relationship with its own immigration history and remains divided about immigration policy. In this course, we examine 20th and 21st-century public policy and how political decisions affect and reflect the realities faced by immigrants, particularly immigrants from Asia, Africa, and Central and South America. In addition, by reading fiction by authors including Chimamanda Adichie, Fae Myenne Ng, Yuri Herrera, Valeria Luiselli, and Neel Patei, we examine how stories tell personal as well as political truths about the immigrant experience. By collecting oral histories from friends, family, and community members, students will contribute to current scholarship on immigration and will create work that can be contributed to the University of Minnesota immigration archive.

  •      HU4400

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Humanities Electives
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of AS4051/AS4052 American Studies I/II and OR completion of AS4051 and approval of the Dean of Humanities during Spring Administrative Adjustment. Juniors may not request this course until Spring Administrative Adjustment.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Humanities credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week OR two 100-min. evening periods

    HU4400 Black Studies

    Black Studies implements an interdisciplinary format to examine the cultural, political, and economic development of Black America. The course begins with the African Diaspora and culminates with the rise of Hip Hop culture. On one hand, the course examines a long history of white supremacy in Anglo-American thought and action that exploited black labor and delegitimized black lives. On the other hand, the course interrogates Black America's persistent fight for full citizenship and cultural autonomy—a domestic crusade that draws strength and meaning from anti-colonial struggles abroad. Students will continually ask: What defines "whiteness" and "blackness"? What functions do racial classifications serve? Overall, students locate the origins and development of the conflicts and commonalities at the heart of the Black American experience.

  •      HU4405

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Humanities Electives
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of AS4051/AS4052 American Studies I/II and OR completion of AS4051 and approval of the Dean of Humanities during Spring Administrative Adjustment. Juniors may not request this course until Spring Administrative Adjustment.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Humanities credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week OR two 100-min. evening periods

    HU4405 American Indian and Indigenous Studies

    This course introduces the interdisciplinary field of American Indian and Indigenous Studies and explores some of the diverse Native cultures, knowledge systems, histories, and research methods that make the field a dynamic and increasingly popular area of research. The course will explore the perspectives of Native peoples through literature, film, oral tradition, academic scholarship, and material culture. Using these expressions, students will analyze the significance of topics including land, community, sovereignty, treaty rights, self-determination, and environmental justice. Through research and reflection, students will leverage Native perspectives to unpack dominant historical narratives that facilitate settler colonialism and stereotypes of Native people that permeate popular portrayals. By the end of the course, students will apply interdisciplinary American Indian and Indigenous Studies research methods and analysis to examine a contemporary issue or topic that resonates with their interests.

  •      HU4410

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Humanities Electives
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of AS4051/AS4052 American Studies I/II and OR completion of AS4051 and approval of the Dean of Humanities during Spring Administrative Adjustment. Juniors may not request this course until Spring Administrative Adjustment.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Humanities credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week OR two 100-min. evening periods

    HU4410 Critical Race Theory

    This course explores the foundations and central tenets of Critical Race Theory, from its origins in Critical Legal Studies, to current applications, debates, and evolutions, with particular attention to CRT’s intersections with the field of American Studies (including “offshoots” such as TribalCrit, LatCrit, AsianCrit, and DisCrit). The class will collectively create a working list of characteristics that we can apply to legal cases, literature, and other mainstream pop-cultural texts such as plays, music (videos), TV shows, and movies. CRT provides a meaningful, practical, and evidence-based lens to engage in cultural productions of citizenship and race as they relate to the U.S. and to emerging concepts of global citizenship. One of the most important aspects of engaged citizenship is to formulate an understanding of the diverse experiences of U.S. citizens; this course allows students to explore those diverse experiences and different understandings of belonging through legal studies and storytelling/narratives. By the end of the course, students will produce scholarship that addresses their expanded knowledge base by applying the framework to a cultural text outside the required course texts.

  •      HU4411

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Humanities Electives
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of AS4051/AS4052 American Studies I/II and OR completion of AS4051 and approval of the Dean of Humanities during Spring Administrative Adjustment. Juniors may not request this course until Spring Administrative Adjustment.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Humanities credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week OR two 100-min. evening periods

    HU4411 Critical Legal Studies

    This course explores the foundations and central tenets of Critical Legal Studies, including current applications, debates, and evolutions, with particular attention to its intersections with the fields of American Studies, Urban Studies, and Ethnic Studies. Course texts, organizing questions, and the discussions to which students are invited take for granted that the law is an organizing pillar of U.S. society, and that the law creates and is informed by discourses, practices, and systems of oppression including, but not limited to, systemic racism, gender inequity, heterosexism, and classism. This course will explore the nuances of how dispossession, disenfranchisement, wealth inequality, and more are embedded within our legal system. Critical Legal Studies’ objectives are in a way self-evident from the course title—the course invites its participants to review the law critically. The field provides a meaningful, practical, and evidence-based lens to engage in cultural productions of personhood and citizenship as they relate to the U.S. and to emerging concepts of global citizenship. This course allows students to explore diverse experiences and different understandings of belonging through legal studies and storytelling/narratives. By the end of the course, students will produce scholarship that demonstrates their expanded knowledge as they apply the framework of Critical Legal Studies to their lived experiences.

  •      HU4420

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Humanities Electives
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of AS4051/AS4052 American Studies I/II and OR completion of AS4051 and approval of the Dean of Humanities during Spring Administrative Adjustment. Juniors may not request this course until Spring Administrative Adjustment.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Humanities credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week OR two 100-min. evening periods

    HU4420 Digital Humanities

    When you think about "technology" you probably don't think about the humanities, but inventions from the alphabet and the printing press to the internet browser, apps, and e-readers are all technologies that have shaped not only what and how we read but how we think. In the twenty-first century, texts and technologies are inextricably intertwined. Computational data analysis, topic modeling, GIS mapping, and data visualization give us more tools with which to explore the rich field of humanities, as we strive to understand what it means to be humans who read, write, interpret, and share texts. In Digital Humanities, students learn and apply a wide variety of computing methods (such as text pattern analyses, network generation and analyses, and image processing) and tools (such as Mathematica and R) to the study of literature, history, art, and other subjects in the humanities and social sciences. A main feature of the course is the opportunity for students to apply these methods and tools to explore their own interests and areas of inquiry in a culminating research project. Digital Humanities lies at the intersection of the study of the humanities—literature and language, history, economics, psychology, sociology, and the arts—with the technologies, techniques, and tools of computational science and is team-taught by instructors from the Humanities and Science Departments.

  •      HU4430

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Humanities Electives
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of AS4051/AS4052 American Studies I/II and OR completion of AS4051 and approval of the Dean of Humanities during Spring Administrative Adjustment. Juniors may not request this course until Spring Administrative Adjustment.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Humanities credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week OR two 100-min. evening periods

    HU4430 Ethics of AI

    This course will introduce students to the major ethical topics and problems facing researchers and policymakers in the development and social integration of artificial intelligence. Because the class does not require any previous coursework in ethics, it will begin with a unit introducing students to the field of ethics and the techniques and terms of ethical reasoning. Students will read foundational texts in the three major fields of ethics—virtue ethics, rules-based ethics, and consequentialist ethics—as well as pragmatist and evolutionary challenges to those fields. This unit will conclude with an essay in which students choose one of the thinkers or schools of ethics that we have studied and argue for its usefulness in the programming of AI. After students have completed their introduction to ethical decision-making, the course will shift to project-based, student-driven learning, in which each student chooses one area of current AI research (i.e. self-driving cars, lethal autonomous weapons, facial recognition software, etc.) and explores the ethical ramifications of that research. Students will first assess the state of the field and its ethical challenges in a literature review, then generate a presentation for researchers and policy makers outlining those challenges and proposed solutions, and conclude with a position paper that argues for a specific legal or regulatory policy to govern the ethical rules of their chosen field.

  •      HU4440

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Humanities Electives
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of AS4051/AS4052 American Studies I/II and OR completion of AS4051 and approval of the Dean of Humanities during Spring Administrative Adjustment. Juniors may not request this course until Spring Administrative Adjustment.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Humanities credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week OR two 100-min. evening periods

    HU4440 Film Studies

    Filmmaker Orson Welles once said, “A film is a ribbon of dreams. The camera is much more than a recording apparatus; it is a medium via which messages reach us from another world that is not ours and that brings us to the heart of a great secret. Here magic begins.” In a culture that increasingly relies on visual information, a comprehension of how meaning grows out of the moving image is essential. This course is a historical and critical survey of the motion picture both as a developing art form and as a medium of mass communication. The course entails systematic analysis of how filmmakers use sound and image to tell stories on the screen. Students view selected films as case studies to understand the relationship between theory and practice in filmmaking. Through explorations of the historical, social, and political dimensions of filmmaking, students learn to read and write more effectively, to look at the world with a critical eye, and most importantly, to develop a critical audio-visual literacy. Students demonstrate what they have learned through analytical writing assignments. The course may also include individual or group projects, presentations, creative writing, or short exercises in filmmaking.

  •      HU4445

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Humanities Electives
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of AS4051/AS4052 American Studies I/II and OR completion of AS4051 and approval of the Dean of Humanities during Spring Administrative Adjustment. Juniors may not request this course until Spring Administrative Adjustment.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Humanities credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week and a lab

    HU4445 Introduction to Western Thought

    This course will examine the fundamental philosophical, economic, and political ideas that have shaped the modern world: subjectivity, capitalism, and liberalism. Other sources may include Plato, the Hebrew Bible, Augustine, Aquinas, Julian of Norwich, Descartes, Thomas Hobbes, John Locke, Adam Smith, and Karl Marx. One of the key goals of the liberal arts is to prepare students to live in a free society. An important aspect of freedom is awareness of the forces shaping the world we live in. We will consider how these fundamental ideas developed; we will emphasize finding connections between ideas; we will examine how those ideas impact our own thinking; and we will develop analytical writing skills by responding to those ideas. 

  •      HU4450

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Humanities Electives
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of AS4051/AS4052 American Studies I/II and OR completion of AS4051 and approval of the Dean of Humanities during Spring Administrative Adjustment. Juniors may not request this course until Spring Administrative Adjustment.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Humanities credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week OR two 100-min. evening periods

    HU4450 Race, Leadership, and Ethics

    Students study profiles of leadership in relationship to issues of racial justice and equality. They acquire an in-depth knowledge of ethics and apply that knowledge to historical and contemporary issues involving racial identity and racial justice in the American cultural landscape. Topics addressed in the course include tools for ethical decision-making, race and education, the criminal justice system and the death penalty, race-based medicine, eugenics, racial profiling, racial privilege, and appreciation vs. appropriation of culture. Course materials and activities include readings, discussions, tests and essays, films, and guest speakers.

  •      HU4460

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Humanities Electives
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of AS4051/AS4052 American Studies I/II and OR completion of AS4051 and approval of the Dean of Humanities during Spring Administrative Adjustment. Juniors may not request this course until Spring Administrative Adjustment.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Humanities credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week OR two 100-min. evening periods

    HU4460 Topics in Humanities I

    The experiences of immigrants to this “nation of immigrants” have a profound influence on our nation’s history and a deep influence on the development of what it means to be an American. Immigration patterns and policy play key roles in these experiences. However, the United States has a fraught relationship with its own immigration history and remains divided about immigration policy. In this course, we examine twentieth- and twenty-first-century public policy and how political decisions affect and reflect the realities faced by immigrants, particularly immigrants from Asia, Africa, and Central and South America. In addition, by reading fiction by authors including Chimamanda Adichie, Junot Diaz, Fae Myenne Ng, and Jhumpa Lahiri, we examine how stories tell personal as well as political truths about the immigrant experience. By collecting oral histories from friends, family, and community members, students will contribute to current scholarship on immigration and will create work that can be contributed to the University of Minnesota immigration archives.

  •      HU4461

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Humanities Electives
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of AS4051/AS4052 American Studies I/II and OR completion of AS4051 and approval of the Dean of Humanities during Spring Administrative Adjustment. Juniors may not request this course until Spring Administrative Adjustment.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Humanities credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week OR two 100-min. evening periods

    HU4461 Topics in Humanities II

    In critically examining our own minds we will distinguish several basic mental activities. Most basic is INTUITING as looking at or beholding any sensate thing, and even as contemplating mathematical truths or meaning expressed in images or symbols. SUFFERING is also a basic mental activity, as a being subjected to wide ranges of experience and feeling, as presupposed for knowing how another is feeling and even for recognizing and responding to irony and jokes. DREAMING is meaningful lived experience while sleeping, AESTHETIC SENSE is perception of beauty, and ETHICAL AWARENESS is perception of “ought” as “not is,” as presupposing some degree of freedom. Earliest in life is APPERCEPTION as an infant’s experience of being looked at, by mother, as a continuity of being. Even EXPERIENCING NONSENSE may be creative. THINKING is grasping a manifold into a concept; JUDGING is joining concepts into a statement; REASONING is putting statements together logically; AI as computer logic depends on and expresses these three mental acts. In this course, we will read and discuss original texts describing mind: Plato on recollection; Aristotle on cause; Augustine on time; Anselm on belief; Descartes and Leibniz on thinking; Kant and Husserl on intending awareness; Winnicott on apperception; Mme de Condorcet and Mme de Lambert on feeling. Six two-page papers, one class presentation, no final exam.

  •      HU4470

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Humanities Electives
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of AS4051/AS4052 American Studies I/II and OR completion of AS4051 and approval of the Dean of Humanities during Spring Administrative Adjustment. Juniors may not request this course until Spring Administrative Adjustment.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Humanities credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week OR two 100-min. evening periods

    HU4470 Topics in the Study of Religion

    Religion matters. Even in today's modern, ostensibly secular world, religion continues to exercise a powerful role in the lives and relationships of individuals, communities, and societies. Religious literacy is more important than ever in an increasingly globalized age, and for the promotion of peaceable world. In this course, using a variable selection of topics, we investigate the phenomenon of religion as a human activity, taking a comparative approach to examine several of the world's major religious traditions, as well as a number of practices that don't usually count as "religious." Through the exploration of key topics, we ask a variety of questions about religion, including: What is religion? What commonalities do religions have, and how do they differ—internally and externally? How do religions attempt to address the major problems of human life? What visions of the true, the beautiful, and the good do various religions offer? How do religious adherents and discontents seek to shape their individual and social lives in response to religion? What is the relationship of religion and the modern world, especially regarding secularity and science? To answer these questions, we investigate myth and ritual theory, textual and oral traditions, religious thought and dissent, ethics and identity formation, aesthetics and practices, and more. We also take our exploration out of the classroom, conducting field work to experience religion as it is lived.

  •      HU4480

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Humanities Electives
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of AS4051/AS4052 American Studies I/II and OR completion of AS4051 and approval of the Dean of Humanities during Spring Administrative Adjustment. Juniors may not request this course until Spring Administrative Adjustment.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Humanities credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week OR two 100-min. evening periods

    HU4480 Topics in American Studies: Asian American Studies

    This interdisciplinary course allows students to continue their exploration of the multiple strands of American culture begun in the junior year American Studies course. With time for deeper examination of contemporary American life, the course familiarizes students with the context of continuing political, social, and cultural issues and with the arcs of recent change relevant to their own lifetimes. By studying selected primary and secondary sources from the 1960s to the present day, students construct their own understandings of the multiple identities articulated by modern Americans living in increasingly global and virtual communities. The course offers students the opportunity to explore topics of consequence to them, including explorations of the effects of 9/11, the rise of the LGBTQ movement, and the changes wrought on American culture by the internet and mobile computing. Students cultivate skills of analysis that help them to think and speak with greater clarity, power, and eloquence. Assessments include writing assignments that invite students to synthesize their understanding of the texts, contexts, and cultural artifacts explored in the course.

  •      HU4490

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Humanities Electives
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of AS4051/AS4052 American Studies I/II and OR completion of AS4051 and approval of the Dean of Humanities during Spring Administrative Adjustment. Juniors may not request this course until Spring Administrative Adjustment.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Humanities credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week OR two 100-min. evening periods

    HU4490 Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

    An interdisciplinary introduction to the field of Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, this course explores feminist perspectives on intersecting inequalities. Topics include: work and labor; sexuality and sexual identity; gender relations; images of women and gender in literature, science and technology, religion, and art; family structures and domestic roles; and the history of feminist struggles. Course readings are drawn from the humanities and the social sciences. We will use discussion, lecture, film, reading, written texts, and popular culture to help students continue to develop their skills in reading, critical thinking, writing, presenting, and working collaboratively with their peers to answer questions such as: How do the experiences of women and other subordinated groups help us to understand gender norms, identity categories, and sexuality? How might one perform, analyze, interrogate, and challenge what has been constructed as “normal” in contemporary western culture? This class explores a multitude of feminist perspectives on the intersections of gender, race, sexuality, class, physical ability, nationality, age and other categories of identity. Students will interrogate these categories as socially-constructed while acknowledging that these constructions have real effects in subordinating groups, marking bodies and creating structural, intersectional inequalities.

  •      JA3051

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: One 100-min. evening period per week,Three periods per week

    JA3051 Journeys into Japanese I

    Students begin to acquire and practice basic language skills in speaking, listening, comprehension, reading, and writing. Students acquire a base vocabulary and learn the simple grammatical constructions needed for essential communication. Cultural aspects of Japan are also introduced.

  •      JA3052

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): JA3051 or permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week,One 100-min. evening period per week

    JA3052 Journeys into Japanese II

    Students continue to acquire and practice basic language skills in speaking, listening, comprehension, reading, and writing. Students acquire a base vocabulary and learn the simple grammatical constructions needed for essential communication. Cultural aspects of Japan continue to be introduced.

  •      JA3651

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): JA3052 or permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: One 100-min. evening period per week,Three periods per week

    JA3651 Navigating in Japanese I

    Students continue their journey into Japanese language and culture. Students continue to develop their proficiency in the language by learning and applying grammatical constructions, reading short texts, viewing video programs, and using the language in everyday conversational situations. Students continue to learn and understand important aspects of Japanese culture.

  •      JA3652

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): JA3651 or permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week,One 100-min. evening period per week

    JA3652 Navigating in Japanese II

    Students continue their journey into Japanese language and culture. Students continue to develop their proficiency in the language by learning and applying grammatical constructions, reading short texts, viewing video programs, and using the language in everyday conversational situations. Students continue to learn and understand important aspects of Japanese culture.

  •      JA4151

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Prerequisite(s): JA3052 or permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Two periods per week and a lab

    JA4151 Navigating in Japanese I

    Students continue their journey into Japanese language and culture. Students continue to develop their proficiency in the language by learning and applying grammatical constructions, reading short texts, viewing video programs, and using the language in everyday conversational situations. Students continue to learn and understand important aspects of Japanese culture.

  •      JA4152

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Prerequisite(s): JA4151 or permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Two periods per week and a lab

    JA4152 Navigating in Japanese II

    Students continue their journey into Japanese language and culture. Students continue to develop their proficiency in the language by learning and applying grammatical constructions, reading short texts, viewing video programs, and using the language in everyday conversational situations. Students continue to learn and understand important aspects of Japanese culture.

  •      LA3051

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week and a lab

    LA3051 Latin Elements I

    As Euclid’s Geometry begins with definitions, axioms, and postulates that found all that comes after, so this course is foundational for the rest of Latin study. The seven parts of speech are distinguished, their endings are learned by heart, their grammar is understood and is expressed in sentence diagrams. Nouns and verbs get the most attention, with pronouns, adjectives, and adverbs relating to them. But prepositions, conjunctions, and interjections are short and spare. This first semester course is for students who have little or no rigorous knowledge of Latin.

  •      LA3052

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): LA3051 or permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week and a lab

    LA3052 Latin Elements II

    This course is a continuation of LA3051 Latin Elements I and is necessary for a solid foundation for any further Latin study.

  •      LA3650

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): LA3052 or permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week and a lab

    LA3650 Latin Boot Camp

    This course is a rigorous transition to the study of original ancient Latin literature, which contains much complex grammar and basic vocabulary, and so demands rigorous training. Infinitives, participles, gerunds, gerundives, ablative absolutes, deponents, locatives, subjunctives—the forms, various uses, their translations, the ways in which each is diagrammed—present daily challenges, that, once overcome, bring the student to a new level of understanding, perception, and appreciation of literature.

  •      LA4050

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): LA3650 or permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week and a lab

    LA4050 Caesar in Gaul and Britannia

    This upper-level course is first of all a study of Caesar’s De Bello Gallico, book I, 1-29, in which Caesar tells how he prevents the Helvetians and several other tribes from migrating to southern Gaul and how he has his army kill 258,000 of them. The simple grammar in the book's beginning becomes more complex as the fighting increases; rhetorical devices of style are evident. This true story of human suffering arouses compassion and fear, as Aristotle said tragic accounts must do in educating and transforming their audience, and comparison is made with current events. This course ends with a study of parts of Caesar’s De Bello Gallico, book 4, 1-33, in which Caesar states that his lack of knowledge about Britannia spurs him to invade its coast, though it turns out afterwards that, as he wrote about himself, “This one thing was lacking to his pristine fortune."

  •      LA4651

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): LA4050 or permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week and a lab

    LA4651 Sallust and Cicero I

    This upper-level course is part one of studies of Sallust’s history and Cicero’s orations on the conspiracy of Catiline, when a local uprising in Rome was stifled but led to a war outside of Rome. Sallust’s original and concise style is marked with antique flavor, while Cicero’s speeches flourish in both rhetorical and poetic devices of style. Cicero, a novus homo or man who had no aristocratic ancestors, was consul at the time of this emergency in Rome, and his duplicity is analyzed by later critics. Yet both Sallust and Cicero came to be standard authors studied in schools for subsequent centuries, for both their historical and their literary content. LA4651 and LA4652 may each be taken independently of the other.

  •      LA4652

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): LA4651 or permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week and a lab

    LA4652 Sallust and Cicero II

    This upper-level course is part two of studies of Sallust’s history and Cicero’s orations on the conspiracy of Catiline, when a local uprising in Rome was stifled but led to a war outside of Rome. Sallust’s original and concise style is marked with antique flavor, while Cicero’s speeches flourish in both rhetorical and poetic devices of style. Cicero, a novus homo or man who had no aristocratic ancestors, was consul at the time of this emergency in Rome, and his duplicity is analyzed by later critics. Yet both Sallust and Cicero came to be standard authors studied in schools for subsequent centuries, for both their historical and their literary content. LA4651 and LA4652 may each be taken independently of the other.

  •      LA4661

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): LA4050 or permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week and a lab

    LA4661 Ovid's Metamorphoses I

    This upper-level course is part one of studies of selections from Ovid’s Amores, poems of love and war, and his Metamorphoses, ancient tales made into poetic stories, including Apollo and Daphne, Pyramus and Thisbe, Orpheus and Eurydice, Daedalus and Icarus, Baucis and Philemon, Atalanta and Hippomenes, Narcissus and Echo, Pentheus and Bacchus. Ovid’s artistic genius and psychological insight made him a fruitful source for artists, playwrights, musicians, poets, and story tellers for the subsequent two millennia. We note connections to Ovid in current culture, especially in two films. LA4661 and LA4662 may each be taken independently of the other.

  •      LA4662

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): LA4662 or permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week and a lab

    LA4662 Ovid's Metamorphoses II

    This upper-level course is part two of studies of selections from Ovid’s Amores, poems of love and war, and his Metamorphoses, ancient tales made into poetic stories, including Apollo and Daphne, Pyramus and Thisbe, Orpheus and Eurydice, Daedalus and Icarus, Baucis and Philemon, Atalanta and Hippomenes, Narcissus and Echo, Pentheus and Bacchus. Ovid’s artistic genius and psychological insight made him a fruitful source for artists, playwrights, musicians, poets, and story tellers for the subsequent two millennia. We note connections to Ovid in current culture, especially in two films. LA4661 and LA4662 may each be taken independently of the other.

  •      MA1000

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Mathematics
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): Pre-Calculus
    Graduation Requirements Met: None - Other
    Schedule Requirements Met: Not Applicable
    Meeting Times: Two periods per week and a lab

    MA1000 Precalculus Co-Requisite

  •      MA1012

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Mathematics
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): MA4012
    Graduation Requirements Met: None - Other
    Schedule Requirements Met: Not Applicable
    Meeting Times: One period per week

    MA1012 Calculus Ib Exam Prep

    This co-requisite course is designed for students who plan to take the AP Calculus AB exam. The course will provide resources and support to help students gain skills in preparation for the AP exam. Students in MA4012 are automatically enrolled in MA1012.

  •      MA1030

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Mathematics
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): Calculus
    Graduation Requirements Met: None - Other
    Schedule Requirements Met: Not Applicable
    Meeting Times: Two periods per week and a lab

    MA1030 Calculus Co-Requisite

  •      MA1044

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Mathematics
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): MA4044
    Graduation Requirements Met: None - Other
    Schedule Requirements Met: Not Applicable
    Meeting Times: One period per week

    MA1044 Calculus II Exam Prep

    This co-requisite course is designed for students who plan to take the AP Calculus BC exam. The course will provide resources and support to help students gain skills in preparation for the AP exam. Students in MA4044 are automatically enrolled in MA1044.

  •      MA3550

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Mathematics

    MA3550 Modeling with Matrices

    Miniterm Course for Credit? This introduction to linear algebra develops the arithmetic and algebra matrices and how matrices and matrix operations can be used to model a variety of real-world phenomena. While focusing on applications, the course considers linear transformations, Euclidean vector spaces and inner product spaces, and eigenvectors and eigenvalues. Models include least squares, Fourier analysis, CT scans, morphs, and age specific growth models.

  •      MA3990

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Mathematics
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Mathematics credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    MA3990 Precalculus I

  •      MA3992

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Mathematics
    Prerequisite(s): MA3990
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Mathematics credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    MA3992 Precalculus II

  •      MA4000

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Mathematics
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit OR One Mathematics credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    MA4000 Precalculus & Modeling w/ Advanced Topics I

    This course is devoted to developing a toolkit of functions that serves as a bridge between mathematics and the world it models. The toolkit includes explicitly defined functions such as exponential, polynomial, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions, as well as functions that are defined recursively and parametrically. Students investigate functions, bivariate data, and models with graphing calculators and computers. Both graphical and analytical approaches to problem solving are emphasized. Students also complete lab activities and present their results in formal written reports. This is one part of a 2-semester course sequence (MA4000 and MA4002). Students must enroll in both semesters when registering. Once enrolled students may not drop a single semester without approval from the Dean of Mathematics.

  •      MA4002

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Mathematics
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Mathematics credit OR One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    MA4002 Precalculus & Modeling w/ Advanced Topics II

    This course is devoted to developing a toolkit of functions that serves as a bridge between mathematics and the world it models. The toolkit includes explicitly defined functions such as exponential, polynomial, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions, as well as functions that are defined recursively and parametrically. Students investigate functions, bivariate data, and models with graphing calculators and computers. Both graphical and analytical approaches to problem solving are emphasized. Students also complete lab activities and present their results in formal written reports. This is one part of a 2-semester course sequence (MA4000 and MA4002). Students must enroll in both semesters when registering. Once enrolled students may not drop a single semester without approval from the Dean of Mathematics.

  •      MA4010

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Mathematics
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): MA4002 Precalculus & Modeling w/ Advanced Topics II
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit OR One Mathematics credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week and a lab

    MA4010 Biocalculus

    This course introduces students to concepts of calculus and the applications of calculus to mathematical modeling of biological systems. The emphasis in this course is on understanding many of the big ideas of calculus through discovery labs and the use of technology. Through class discussions, problem solving, laboratory experiences, and writing assignments students discover connections between concepts of calculus and life sciences. They will develop an understanding of these concepts, and use these concepts in solving realistic problems, including applying mathematical techniques to analyze real data sets. There is less of an emphasis on algebraic manipulation in this course compared to AP Calculus courses. Calculators and computers are frequently used as tools in the course. Calculus topics normally covered include rates of change, linear approximations, interpretations of the derivative and integral, differential equations, and the concept of a limit. Biology topics may include homeostasis, ecological stability, population dynamics, membrane dynamics, molecule interactions, climate change, and evolution.

  •      MA4012

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Mathematics
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Course ending grade of B- or better in MA4002 Precalculus & Modeling w/ Advanced Topics II
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Mathematics credit OR One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    MA4012 Calculus Ia

    This course introduces students to the concepts of differential calculus and the applications of calculus to mathematical modeling. Through class discussions, problem solving, laboratory experiences, and writing assignments students discover the important concepts of calculus, develop an understanding of these concepts, and use these concepts in solving realistic problems. This course generally includes the completion of a substantial mathematical modeling project. Calculators and computers are used as tools in the course. Topics typically covered include the derivative, techniques of differentiation, local linearity of functions, linear approximations, the concept of a limit. This is one part of a 2-semester course sequence (MA4010 and MA4012 or MA4010 and MA4014). Students must enroll in both semesters when registering. Once enrolled students may not drop a single semester without approval from the Dean of Mathematics.

  •      MA4014

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Mathematics
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Course ending grade of B- or better in MA4012 Calculus Ia or permission of the Dean of Math
    Corequisite(s): MA1012
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Mathematics credit OR One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    MA4014 Calculus Ib with AP Exam Prep

    This course is identical to MA4014 Calculus Ib, except that students enrolled in MA4012 are also enrolled in our MA1012 Calculus Ib Exam Prep course and plan to take the AP Calculus AB exam. NOTE: Students in MA4014 and 4012 will be in the same classroom for the course. If a student would like to drop MA1012 Calculus Ib Exam Prep, then their core course would change to MA4014 Calculus Ib without a change in block.

  •      MA4016

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Mathematics
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Course ending grade of B- or better in MA4012 Calculus Ia or permission of the Dean of Math
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Mathematics credit OR One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    MA4016 Calculus Ib

    Course Description: This course continues the study of calculus and its applications to mathematical modeling. Through class discussions, problem solving, laboratory experiences, and writing assignments students discover the important concepts of calculus, develop an understanding of these concepts, and use these concepts in solving realistic problems. This course generally includes the completion of a substantial mathematical modeling project. Calculators and computers are used as tools in the course. Topics typically covered include applications of the derivative, implicit differentiation and related rates, an introduction to differential equations, Euler's method, and an introduction to integration and integration techniques. This is one part of a 2-semester course sequence (MA4010 and MA4012 or MA4010 and MA4014). Students must enroll in both semesters when registering. Students must enroll in both semesters when registering. Once enrolled students may not drop a single semester without approval from the Dean of Mathematics.

  •      MA4042

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Mathematics
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Course-ending grade of B+ or higher in MA4002 Precalculus & Modeling w/ Advanced Topics II
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Mathematics credit OR One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    MA4042 Calculus I

    This course provides students with an introduction to the concepts of differential calculus and the applications of calculus to mathematical modeling. Through class discussions, problem solving, laboratory experiences, and writing assignments students discover the important concepts of calculus, develop an understanding of these concepts, and use these concepts in solving realistic problems. This course generally includes the completion of a substantial mathematical modeling project. Calculators and computers are used as tools in the course. Topics typically covered include the concept of a limit, the derivative, local linearity of functions, linear approximations, applications of the derivative, l'Hopital's rule, and an introduction to integration and integration techniques. This is one part of a 2-semester course sequence (MA4040 and MA4042 or MA4040 and MA4044). Students must enroll in both semesters when registering. Once enrolled, students may not drop a single semester without approval from the Dean of Mathematics.

  •      MA4044

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Mathematics
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): B- or higher in MA4042 Calculus I or permission of the Dean of Math
    Corequisite(s): MA1042
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Mathematics credit OR One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    MA4044 Calculus II with AP Exam Prep

    This course is identical to MA4044 Calculus II, except that students enrolled in MA4042 are also enrolled in MA1042 Calculus II Exam Prep and plan to take the AP Calculus BC exam. NOTE: Students in MA4044 and 4042 will be in the same classroom for the course. If a student would like to drop MA1042 Calculus II Exam Prep, then their core course would change to MA4044 Calculus II without a change

  •      MA4046

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Mathematics
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): B- or higher in MA4042 Calculus I or permission of the Dean of Math
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Mathematics credit OR One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    MA4046 Calculus II

    This course continues the accelerated study of calculus and its applications to mathematical modeling from Calculus I. Through class discussions, problem solving, laboratory experiences, and writing assignments students discover the important concepts of calculus, develop an understanding of these concepts, and use these concepts in solving realistic problems. This course generally includes the completion of a substantial mathematical modeling project. Calculators and computers are used as tools in the course. Topics typically covered include an introduction to differential equations, slope fields, Euler's method, definite and indefinite integrals, numerical approximations of integrals, advanced integration techniques, applications of integrals, Taylor polynomials, and series (including power series). This is the second part of a 2-semester course sequence (MA4040 and MA4042 or MA4040 and MA4044). Students must enroll in both semesters when registering. Once enrolled, students may not drop a single semester without approval from the Dean of Mathematics.

  •      MA4050

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Mathematics
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): B- or higher in MA4046 Calculus II or MA4044 Calculus II w/AP Prep, or permission of the Dean of Math
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Mathematics credit OR One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    MA4050 Modeling with Differential Equations

    In this course students examine what differential equations are and how they are used to model real-world phenomena. They also look at different techniques for solving differential equations and interpret their solutions in a real world context. Matrices and vector functions will be utilized to help prepare students for future coursework in Calculus and Linear Algebra. Analytical methods, geometric methods, and numerical methods are included. Technology is an important component of the course.

  •      MA4060

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Mathematics
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): B- or higher in MA4046 Calculus II or MA4044 Calculus II w/AP Prep, or permission of the Dean of Math
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit OR One Mathematics credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week

    MA4060 Multivariable Calculus

    This course includes the theory and application of vector functions and partial derivatives. Topics include a vector approach to regression modeling, the Frenet-Serret equations, continuity and differentiability of functions of several variables, gradients and directional derivatives, and classic optimization problems. Numerical methods such as Newton's Method for solving non-linear systems and modeling with vector-valued functions of scalar and scalar-valued functions of a vector are included.

  •      MA4100

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Mathematics
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Mathematics credit OR One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    MA4100 AP Statistics w/ Advanced Topics I

    MA4100 and MA4102 constitute a comprehensive introduction to statistics and include all of the topics on the AP Statistics syllabus. This is one part of a 2-semester course sequence (MA4100 and MA4102). Students must enroll in both semesters when registering. Once enrolled students may not drop a single semester without approval from the Dean of Mathematics.

  •      MA4102

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Mathematics
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): MA4100 AP Statistics w/ Advanced Topics I
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Mathematics credit OR One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    MA4102 AP Statistics w/ Advanced Topics II

    MA4100 and MA4102 constitute a comprehensive introduction to statistics and include all of the topics on the AP Statistics syllabus. This is one part of a 2-semester course sequence (MA4100 and MA4102). Students must enroll in both semesters when registering. Once enrolled students may not drop a single semester without approval from the Dean of Mathematics.

  •      MA4110

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Mathematics
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): MA4000 Precalculus & Modeling w/ Advanced Topics I
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Mathematics credit OR One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    MA4110 Foundations of Data Science

    This course combines three perspectives: inferential thinking, computational thinking, and real-world relevance. Given data arising from some real-world phenomenon, how does one analyze that data so as to understand that phenomenon? The course teaches critical concepts and skills in computer programming and statistical inference, in conjunction with hands-on analysis of real-world datasets, including economic data, document collections, geographical data, and social networks. It delves into social issues surrounding data analysis such as privacy and design.

  •      MA4112

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Mathematics
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Course-ending grade of B+ or higher in MA4110 Foundations of Data Science
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Mathematics credit OR One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    MA4112 Advanced Data Science

    Combining data, computation, and inferential thinking, data science is redefining how people and organizations solve challenging problems and understand their world. This second course in data science prepares students for future work in computer science and statistics courses as well as computational science courses in other fields. In this class, we explore key areas of data science including question formulation, data collection and cleaning, visualization, statistical inference, predictive modeling, and decision making.? Through a strong emphasis on data centric computing, quantitative critical thinking, and exploratory data analysis, this class covers key principles and techniques of data science. These include languages for transforming, querying and analyzing data; algorithms for machine learning methods including regression, classification and clustering; principles behind creating informative data visualizations; statistical concepts of measurement error and prediction; and techniques for scalable data processing.

  •      MA4200/CS4200

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Mathematics
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit OR One Mathematics credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    MA4200/CS4200 Cryptography

    Crosslisted as CS4200. This course introduces students to cryptographic methods used to encipher and decipher secret messages with an emphasis on using computer programming to automate the process. Through class discussions, problem solving, group activities, and programming assignments, students will learn a variety of encryption schemes ranging from the age of Caesar to modern public key encryption used to secure digital communications online. Students will learn introductory number theory and statistics to describe these methods and identify weaknesses that allow secret messages to be read without the key. Students will also learn programming topics such as variables, functions, conditional logic, looping, and file input/output in the Python language to implement each cryptographic method. This course will utilize a blended learning environment with large portions of material being taught online and utilizing in class time for working in groups.

  •      MA4210

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Mathematics
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): MA4000 Precalculus & Modeling w/ Advanced Topics I
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Mathematics credit OR One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week and a lab

    MA4210 Topics in Civic Mathematics

    Finite Mathematics w/ Social Science Focus offers students an overview of a number of applications of mathematics, especially those topics that relate to the concept of fair and just relations between the individual and society. Topics covered include fair division of resources and costs, voting methods, apportionment of legislative bodies, power of voting coalitions, graph theory and networks and recursive systems. The course will also extend students' knowledge of matrices and their use in applications related to the social sciences, as well as probability and univariate data analysis. Applications and modeling are central to this course of study. Students are expected to be involved in formulating and modeling problems, applying the appropriate mathematics to find solutions, and evaluating those solutions. Computers and calculators are incorporated as computational modeling aids. Activities in this course include lectures, weekly synchronous class meetings, discussions, projects, group activities and assessments.

  •      MA4220

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Mathematics
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of MA4002 Precalculus with Advanced Topics II
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Mathematics credit OR One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods and a lab OR Three periods and two labs

    MA4220 Mathematical Modeling

    Students with advanced mathematical knowledge are introduced to the creative and analytic aspects of modeling real-world phenomena. Models from engineering, biology, political science, management science, and everyday life are examined through a variety of techniques. When presented with a situation, students learn to develop, test, and revise an appropriate model. The course is project-oriented and focuses on applying the mathematics students already know. Group work is required, and students present their work in extensive written reports.

  •      MA4230

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Mathematics
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Mathematics credit OR One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    MA4230 Complex Systems and Modern Networks

    This course is a survey of topics involving complex systems and modern networks. Some of the topics studied in the course are fractals and iterated function systems, chaos and chaotic behavior, cellular automata and self-organization, genetic algorithms and neural networks. Web applications and computer programs are essential tools of the course. Familiarity with programming is advantageous but not necessary.

  •      MA4240

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Mathematics
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Previous knowledge of a programming langauge
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Mathematics credit OR One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week

    MA4240 Numerical Analysis

    This course, which requires familiarity with a programming language, introduces students to the theory and practice of computational methods to analyze mathematical problems. Topics include computer arithmetic and computational error, function approximation, numerical differentiation and integration, curve-fitting, solving non-linear equations and systems of equations, and numerical solutions to ordinary differential equations. This course is the equivalent of a one-semester university course in numerical analysis.

  •      MA4300

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Mathematics
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Mathematics credit OR One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week and a lab

    MA4300 Combinatorics and Game Theory

    This is a college-level mathematics course that introduces students to some of the major topics in combinatorics. Topics include permutations and combinations, binomial and multinomial expansions, inclusion-exclusion, methods of generating functions, recursive equations, and economic game theory.

  •      MA4302

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Mathematics

    MA4302 Advanced Combinatorics

  •      MA4310

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Mathematics
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): A- or higher in MA4500 OR Previous experience with rigorous proof writing AND Permission of Mathematics Department Chair
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Mathematics credit OR One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    MA4310 Topics in Theoretical Mathematics

    Selected topics from number theory, abstract algebra, and advanced combinatorics, are studied. They include divisibility properties of integers, special properties of prime numbers, congruences, Euler's Phi function, and some applications to fields such as cryptography and computer science. Students are expected to enter this course with previous experience in proof writing. Students with programming experience are encouraged to use this tool to investigate some of the ideas presented in the course. Strong interest and talent in mathematics are required.

  •      MA4320

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Mathematics
    Prerequisite(s): MA4046 Calculus II or MA4044 Calculus II w/AP Prep, or permission of the Dean of Math
    Corequisite(s): none
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Mathematics credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    MA4320 Linear Algebra with Applications

    This course is a study of systems of linear equations, matrices, vectors, vector spaces, linear transformations, eigenvalues, eigenvectors, orthogonality and matrix decompositions. This course will focus on applications including least-squares solutions, Markov chains, and systems of linear differential equations as well as proof writing.

  •      MA4500

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Mathematics
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Mathematics credit OR One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    MA4500 Graph Theory with REX Math

    This course develops the theory and application of graphs, a major area of modern mathematics, and also provides an introduction to mathematical proof and research. Students develop their ability to make thoughtful conjectures, and to verify those conjectures with valid mathematical arguments. This is done by considering questions of graph structures and colorings, tree and path optimization, matrix representations, and some open questions in the field. Students are then required to investigate an open problem in which they demonstrate their ability to make conjectures and to write concise, complete, and coherent proofs. Strong interest and talent in mathematics are required.

  •      MA4510

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Mathematics
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): MA4500 AND Research Program Application. Exemption of MA4500 possible with approval of the Mathematics Department Chair.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Mathematics credit OR One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week and a lab

    MA4510 Research in Mathematics

    This course is designed for students who have completed calculus and would like to work on a research team investigating an unsolved problem in mathematics. Since the research questions usually arise from the fields of graph theory and complex systems, students are encouraged to complete MA4500 Graph Theory with REX Math and MA4230 Introduction to Complex Systems prior to enrolling or to have completed comparable coursework in 9th or 10th grade.

  •      MA4512

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Mathematics
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): MA4510 Research in Mathematics I OR MA4520 Advanced Mathematical Topics I OR MA4522 Advanced Mathematics Topics II
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Mathematics credit OR One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week and a lab

    MA4512 Research in Mathematics II

    This course continues the project begun in MA4510. Students write a formal paper presenting the background of the problem and any prior results found by other researchers. The students' results are then presented in standard mathematical form with all necessary detail in the proofs and corollaries presented. If the students' results warrant, the paper may be submitted for publication.

  •      MA4520

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Mathematics
    Prerequisite(s): Permission of Dean or Instructor
    Corequisite(s): N/A
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Mathematics credit OR One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week

    MA4520 Advanced Mathematical Topics I

    This course offers an opportunity for students with an especially strong background in mathematics to pursue a rigorous study of a topic outside the standard curriculum. The topic chosen may be in mathematics or a mathematical study of another field. Students are expected to make formal presentations and to write a paper on the topic. This course is intended for students who have exhausted the other course offerings in mathematics or who wish to do independent research in mathematics. Repeatable for credit.

  •      MA4522

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Mathematics
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Mathematics Department Chair
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit OR One Mathematics credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week

    MA4522 Advanced Mathematical Topics II

    This course offers an opportunity for students with an especially strong background in mathematics to pursue a rigorous study of a topic outside the standard curriculum. The topic chosen may be in mathematics or a mathematical study of another field. Students are expected to make formal presentations and to write a paper on the topic. This course is intended for students who have exhausted the other course offerings in mathematics or who wish to do independent research in mathematics. Repeatable for credit. 1 after school meeting per week with faculty sponsor from partner university.

  •      MR3080

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Interdisciplinary Electives
    Prerequisite(s): No prerequisite courses required, however, students must apply, be accepted, and fully commit to the Mentorship Program. This course is required for juniors selected to the NCSSM Mentorship program via application reviewed by Director of Mentorship and Research and committee. The successful completion of this course with a minimum of a B is required to be accepted to continue the NCSSM Mentorship experience in the summer for Mentorship 1 students, in academic year for Mentorship 2 students, and summer/academic year for Mentorship 3 students.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One elective credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: Additional elective
    Meeting Times: One period per week

    MR3080 Mentorship: Foundations in Research

    Foundations in Mentorship is a required course for NCSSM junior online and residential students selected for NCSSM Mentorship Program to prepare students to engage in their Mentorship experience with an off-campus mentor in the upcoming summer and/or academic year. This course equips students with research skills to be a proactive participant in an ongoing or independent research and the personal success skills necessary for the social and communication dynamics in a professional environment. Students will identify their strengths and weaknesses, implement tools for developing and evaluating goals, , and develop critical thinking skills as they apply techniques to acquire, read, understand, and synthesize primary research or professional literature or sources as well as engage in small group interactions to discuss peer reviewed research articles. As part of this course, students will begin a portfolio of materials demonstrating their growth and skill development, including a set of readings that relate to their research and a record of their reflection and activities throughout the journey. In addition, students will complete all necessary tasks to identify and secure a mentor for the student’s upcoming research experience and to be in compliance for their off-campus Mentorship experience.

  •      MR4050

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Interdisciplinary Electives
    Prerequisite(s): Requires acceptance to the NCSSM Mentorship 2 or Mentorship 3 program via application reviewed by the Director of Mentorship and Research and committee and successful completion of IE308 Mentorship Explorations with a grade of B or higher and an approved and committed mentor for the Mentorship experience (unless approved by the Director of Mentorship and Research).
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One elective credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week and two labs

    MR4050 Mentorship: Senior Research I

    Mentorship: Senior Research is a course required for students in Mentorship 2 and Mentorship 3 Programs. This course gives students ownership of their Mentorship opportunity by facilitating students’ professional and personal skills including reflecting on and achieving personal goals, crafting and delivering an effective message, and successfully engaging in a research project. Students will continue to investigate their curiosity and interests by making foundational connections between primary research or professional literature or sources and their own project. As part of this course, students will spend two afternoons per week engaging in their Mentorship experience with an off-campus mentor. A necessary part of that experience includes continuing to build their portfolio of materials demonstrating their growth and skill development, including a set of readings that relate to their particular area of Mentorship interest, a research proposal, a final professional product to communicate their findings, and a record of their reflection and activities throughout the journey. In addition, all students will be required to craft and deliver an oral presentation of their findings to a broad audience at the NCSSM Research Symposium community-wide event in the spring.

  •      MR4051

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Interdisciplinary Electives
    Prerequisite(s): Requires acceptance to the NCSSM Mentorship 2 or Mentorship 3 program via application reviewed by the Director of Mentorship and Research and committee and successful completion of IE308 Mentorship Explorations with a grade of B or higher and an approved and committed mentor for the Mentorship experience (unless approved by the Director of Mentorship and Research).
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One elective credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week and two labs

    MR4051 Mentorship: Senior Research II

  •      MU3500

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Music
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One elective credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: Additional elective
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week

    MU3500 Classical Piano and Guitar

    This course is a comprehensive study of instrumental music and theory through the idioms of piano and guitar. Largely self-paced, this course provides students the opportunity to learn the music repertoire and performance practice of guitar or piano. Students learn playing technique, note reading, chords, harmony, rhythm, and pitch. Students choose guitar or piano as their primary instrument. The course includes written music theory assignments, assigned songs to learn and perform for the instructor, a semester exam, and in-class performances. There is no prerequisite for this course. Students of all levels and experience are eligible. Repeatable for credit.

  •      MU3501

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Music
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One elective credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week

    MU3501 Piano and Guitar

    This course is a comprehensive study of instrumental music and theory through the idioms of piano and guitar. Largely self-paced, this course provides students the opportunity to learn the music repertoire and performance practice of guitar or piano. Students learn playing technique, note reading, chords, harmony, rhythm, and pitch. Students choose guitar or piano as their primary instrument. The course includes written music theory assignments, assigned songs to learn and perform for the instructor, a semester exam, and in-class performances. There is no prerequisite for this course. Students of all levels and experience are eligible. Repeatable for credit.

  •      MU3501

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Music
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One elective credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: Additional elective
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week

    MU3501 Piano and Guitar

    This course is a comprehensive study of instrumental music and theory through the idioms of piano and guitar. Largely self-paced, this course provides students the opportunity to learn the music repertoire and performance practice of guitar or piano. Students learn playing technique, note reading, chords, harmony, rhythm, and pitch. Students choose guitar or piano as their primary instrument. The course includes written music theory assignments, assigned songs to learn and perform for the instructor, a semester exam, and in-class performances. There is no prerequisite for this course. Students of all levels and experience are eligible. Repeatable for credit.

  •      MU4100

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Music
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One elective credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: Additional elective
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week including lab, or two 100-minute even

    MU4100 Chorale

    NCSSM's Chorale is a vocal ensemble that studies and performs a variety of choral literature. This ensemble performs masterworks of choral literature in collaboration annually with other NCSSM musical ensembles. Concepts emphasized include ensemble techniques, vocal production, solfeggio, note reading, and other aspects of choral music. Interested students are encouraged to register for all semesters of this course. Some scheduled weekend rehearsals and weekend concerts. Repeatable for credit.

    Note: Some scheduled weekend rehearsals and weekend concerts.

  •      MU4110

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Music
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One elective credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: Additional elective
    Meeting Times: Three periods and a lab OR two 100-min. evening periods

    MU4110 Wind Ensemble

    NCSSM's Wind Ensemble is an advanced wind band with an emphasis on standard wind band music literature and wind chamber music. Concepts emphasized include tone production, ensemble intonation, performance technique, and musical interpretation. Students interested in symphony orchestra literature are selected by audition to rehearse and perform with the NCSSM Orchestra on a regular basis. Interested students are encouraged to register for all semesters of this course. Repeatable for credit.

    Note: Some scheduled weekend rehearsals and weekend concerts.

  •      MU4120

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Music
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One elective credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: Additional elective
    Meeting Times: Three periods and a lab OR two 100-min. evening periods

    MU4120 Jazz Performance Workshop

    This course is a comprehensive study of jazz music and theory. Students focus on the study of jazz literature, jazz styles, and improvisational skills. Largely self-paced, this course provides students the opportunity to learn jazz literature, theory, and performance practice. Students learn jazz technique, note reading, chords, harmony, rhythm, and style. The course includes written music theory assignments, assigned songs to learn and perform for the instructor, and in-class performances with public performances scheduled as appropriate. Students of all levels and experience are eligible. Repeatable for credit.

    Note: Some scheduled weekend rehearsals and weekend concerts.

  •      MU4130

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Music
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One elective credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: Additional elective
    Meeting Times: Three periods and a lab OR two 100-min. evening periods

    MU4130 Orchestra

    The NCSSM Orchestra is a string orchestra with an emphasis on masterpieces of string and symphony orchestra music literature. Concepts emphasized include performance technique, tone production, ensemble intonation, musical interpretation, and advanced string technique. Winds and percussion are added to the string section from the Wind Ensemble as required by the literature selected for performance. Interested students are encouraged to register for all semesters of this course. Some scheduled weekend rehearsals and weekend concerts. Repeatable for credit

    Note: Some scheduled weekend rehearsals and weekend concerts.

  •      MU4170

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Music
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One elective credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: Additional elective
    Meeting Times: Three periods and a lab OR two 100-min. evening periods

    MU4170 Topics in Music Performance III: Solo Repertoire and Performance (Vocal)

    This course is a comprehensive study of solo repertoire in music and theory through singing performance in varied styles. Largely self-paced, this course provides students the opportunity to learn the music repertoire, techniques and performance practice of voice in the academic setting. Students will learn vocal techniques, historical context, multiple languages, stylistic techniques and performance practice, harmony, rhythm, and pitch. The course includes written theoretical assignments, assigned songs to learn and perform for the instructor, language work, a semester exam, and in-class performances. There is no prerequisite for this course. Students of all levels and experience are eligible. Repeatable for credit.

  •      MU4300

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Music
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One elective credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: Additional elective
    Meeting Times: One period per week,Asynchronous online course

    MU4300 Music Theory and Composition

    This course provides an understanding of classical and contemporary trends in music composition. Students learn fundamental concepts of music theory while learning how to use the latest technologies in musical notation. Students explore songwriting and music composition for various instruments. After understanding fundamental concepts and developing basic skills, students recognize and analyze contemporary trends in music composition and compose and arrange their own music.

  •      MU4305

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Music
    Prerequisite(s): Background in formal music study is highly recommend
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One elective credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: Additional elective
    Meeting Times: Two periods per week

    MU4305 Fundamentals of Music Theory

    This course is a comprehensive study of the fundamental principles of music theory, including pitch, rhythm, scales, intervals, chord construction, and harmonic progressions. Basic arranging and analytical techniques will also be explored in traditional, classical, and popular music styles. This course is designed to prepare students for the AP Music Theory course offered in the spring semester and is recommended for students who already have some background in formal music study, such as school music ensembles or private music lessons.

  •      MU4310

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Music
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): MU4300.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One elective credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: Additional elective
    Meeting Times: Asynchronous online course

    MU4310 AP Music Theory

    This course is a continuation of MU4300 Music Theory and Composition, with an emphasis on preparation for the AP Music Theory exam. Major concepts include musical terminology, analysis, ear training, four-part writing for orchestra and voice, and musical forms. Two periods per week with additional asynchronous online components

  •      MU4400

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Humanities Electives
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One elective credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods and a lab OR two 100-min. evening periods

    MU4400 History of Western Music

    This course is a chronological survey of Western art music focusing primarily on the Baroque, Viennese, and Romantic eras of Western music history. Students learn to listen to and analyze music critically, as a vehicle to understanding theoretical and historical trends of each stylistic period. Overviews of composers and their musical styles serve as a conceptual focus for the music that students examine in each historical period. A key component of the course is regular listening labs in which students sharpen their powers of listening and concentration and apply concepts and theories they have learned in the course to their analyses of selected musical compositions and performances.

  •      PA1000

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Physical Activity & Wellness
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Physical Activity credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: Additional elective
    Meeting Times: One period per week and a lab

    PA1000 Racquet Sports I

    Course will focus on the racquet sports of Badminton and Pickle Ball; sports played over a net using rackets with stroking techniques that vary from relatively slow to quick movements. Students will be able to understand the equipment, rules, strategies and etiquette for each sport. Students will be introduced to basic and intermediate skills for each sport.

  •      PA1001

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Physical Activity & Wellness
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Physical Activity credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: Additional elective
    Meeting Times: One period per week and a lab

    PA1001 Racquet Sports II

    Course will focus on the racquet sports of Tennis and Racquetball; sports played over a net using rackets with stroking techniques that vary from relatively slow to quick movements. Students will be able to understand the equipment, rules, strategies and etiquette for each sport. Students will be introduced to basic and intermediate skills for each sport.

  •      PA1002

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Physical Activity & Wellness
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Physical Activity credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: Additional elective
    Meeting Times: One period per week and a lab

    PA1002 Outdoor Recreation

    Course will cover elements in outdoor recreation to include: hiking, mountain biking and rock wall climbing. Students will get an exposure of different outdoor recreational activities and use leadership skills in planning activities. They will get the opportunity to explore local parks and trails, gain an appreciation of outdoor education and make it a part of a healthy lifestyle.

  •      PA1003

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Physical Activity & Wellness
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Physical Activity credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: Additional elective
    Meeting Times: One period per week and a lab

    PA1003 Disc Sports

    Course will focus on the disc sports of Ultimate Frisbee and Disc Golf. Students will be introduced to basic and intermediate skills of each sport and will understand the rules of the game to play with peers. Students will also learn how to track fitness and make it a part of a healthy lifestyle.

  •      PA1004

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Physical Activity & Wellness
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Physical Activity credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: Additional elective
    Meeting Times: One period per week and a lab

    PA1004 Archery

    Course will focus on Archery and being able to understand the equipment, safety rules, and steps of shooting. Students will be introduced to basic and intermediate skills and learn the steps and technique for nocking and safely shooting an arrow. Students will learn how to track fitness and make it a part of a healthy lifestyle.

  •      PA1005

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Physical Activity & Wellness
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Physical Activity credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: Additional elective
    Meeting Times: One period per week and a lab

    PA1005 Weight Trng/Sprts & Fitness

    This course provides instruction in the fundamental techniques, principles, and concepts in weight training.  Emphasis is on utilizing proper form with each exercise involving resistance to safely obtain increased muscle tone, endurance, strength, or power.  Besides performing weight training to become toned, shaped, or stronger, students can design and execute a program specifically geared to enhancing performance in a sport, or to meet other personal fitness goals.  Students will learn how to track fitness and make it a part of a healthy lifestyle.

  •      PA1006

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Physical Activity & Wellness
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Physical Activity credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: Additional elective
    Meeting Times: One period per week and a lab

    PA1006 Team Sports

    Course will cover various team sports depending on the interest of the class. Students will be introduced to various sports and learn basic and intermediate skills of each sport while understanding the rules of each sport. Students will learn how to track fitness and make it a part of a healthy lifestyle.

  •      PA1007

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Physical Activity & Wellness
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Physical Activity credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: Additional elective
    Meeting Times: One period per week and a lab

    PA1007 Pilates & Yoga

     Students learn the fundamentals of the Pilates method of exercise, along with basic Yoga movements and poses.  Both systems of movement emphasize the use of breath to support mindful movement that develops strength and flexibility.  The Pilates mat work is especially effective in the development of core strength, while the Yoga emphasizes flow, balance, and flexibility.  No previous experience with Pilates or Yoga is required.  Students will learn how to track fitness and make it a part of a healthy lifestyle.

  •      PA1008

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Physical Activity & Wellness
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Physical Activity credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: Additional elective
    Meeting Times: One period per week and a lab

    PA1008 Self Defense

    Self Defense is a course designed to introduce the students to the three A’s of Self Defense. Students will learn awareness, assessment, and action that are critical skills for maintaining personal safety. We will integrate these elements into an effective approach that defines self-defense as a state of mental and physical preparedness.

  •      PA1009

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Physical Activity & Wellness
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Physical Activity credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: Additional elective
    Meeting Times: One period per week and a lab

    PA1009 Hiking

    Course will cover acquiring values from a lifelong activity that contributes to a healthy lifestyle.  Students will be able to understand the rules and etiquette of hiking on the road, greenways and trails, be able to plan and lead a successful hike and will learn about more complex hiking through a NC Park Ranger. Students will learn how to track fitness and make it a part of a healthy lifestyle.

  •      PA1010

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Physical Activity & Wellness
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Physical Activity credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: Additional elective
    Meeting Times: One period per week and a lab

    PA1010 Introduction to Fitness

  •      PA1020

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Physical Activity & Wellness
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Physical Activity credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: Additional elective
    Meeting Times: One period per week and a lab

    PA1020 Fit for Life

    This class is designed to help you develop healthy habits that will last a lifetime. The initial part of the course gives hands-on experience with the state-of-the-art equipment in our campus fitness rooms, including free weights, weight machines, and cardio equipment. You'll also have the opportunity to learn new skills, try different sports, and explore the great outdoors. Individual, team sports, and outdoor sport education activities are offered. This course is tailored to individual and class interests.

  •      PH3040

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Physics
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    PH3040 Astronomy

    This introductory astronomy course focuses on using observations to create predictive models. Physics and chemistry concepts are introduced as needed. Topics include the motion of the night sky, seasons, phases of the moon, our solar system, photometry, spectroscopy, and stellar structure. Students use computers extensively to analyze data and access resources. Opportunities for binocular and nighttime sky observations are available. NOTE: Due to overlap of some content and mastery beyond the scope of this course, this is not an appropriate course for students who have completed Astrophysics.

  •      PH3500

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Physics
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Physics credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    PH3500 Physics Core: Mechanics

    This course provides an algebra-based foundation in the processes of physics, with an emphasis on qualitative and quantitative reasoning. Topics explored focus primarily on mechanics (including forces, momentum, and energy). Students gain experience with problem solving, laboratory practice, and scientific communication. Successful completion of this course will prepare students to take a variety of courses that satisfy the physics graduation requirement.

  •      PH3900

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Physics
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: January Term OR One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: January Term
    Meeting Times: Four week intensive January Term

    PH3900 Research Experience in Physics (*R*)

    This introductory course is for students who want to pursue a research opportunity in physics. No previous physics coursework is required. The course begins with an exploration of data analysis, experimental design, and/or reading and writing scientific papers. The majority of the course will be devoted to working on individual and/or small group research projects. The instructor will work with each student to identify a research question based on students' interests; possible topic areas may be restricted at the instructor's discretion based on available resources and/or instructor expertise. The course culminates with students writing a final paper describing their research and giving a formal presentation of their findings.

  •      PH3920

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Physics
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of one Core Physics course (PH3500; PH4020; PH4240)
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit OR One Physics credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    PH3920 Waves, Sound, and Optics

    This course investigates the physics and application of waves, with emphasis on sound and light waves. We will study how waves are produced, travel, and interact with materials, how sound waves are used to create music, and how light waves are used in technologies including microscopes, spectrometers, interferometers, and lasers. Topics covered include wave properties; wave behaviors, including reflection, refraction, interferences, and diffraction; physics of music; geometric optics; and physics of color. The course has a strong lab component.

  •      PH4000

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Physics
    Prerequisite(s): PH3500 Physics Core: Mechanics
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Physics credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    PH4000 Physics Core: E&M

    This course provides an algebra-based foundation in the areas of Electromagnetism and Waves, with an emphasis on qualitative and quantitative reasoning. Topics explored include Electrostatics, Circuits, Magnetism, Simple Harmonic Motion, and Mechanical Waves. Students gain experience with problem-solving, laboratory practice, and scientific communication. This course, together with Physics Core: Mechanics, covers the majority of material typically found in a year-long introductory course. Credit cannot be earned for both PH4000 Physics Core: E&M and PH4120 Physics Core: E&M (Math Intensive).

  •      PH4020

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Physics
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Physics credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    PH4020 Physics Core: Mechanics (Math Intensive) (*M*)

    This course provides a Precalculus-based foundation in the processes of physics, with an emphasis on qualitative and quantitative reasoning. Topics explored focus primarily on mechanics (including forces, momentum, and energy). Students gain experience with problem-solving, laboratory practice, and scientific communication. Successful completion of this course will prepare students to take a variety of courses that satisfy the physics graduation requirement.

  •      PH4120

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Physics
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of PH4020 or permission of the Chair of Physics
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Physics credit OR One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    PH4120 Physics Core: E&M (Math Intensive) (*M*)

    This course provides a Precalculus-based foundation in the areas of Electromagnetism and Waves, with an emphasis on qualitative and quantitative reasoning. Topics explored will include Electrostatics, Circuits, Magnetism, Simple Harmonic Motion, and Mechanical Waves. Students gain experience with problem-solving, laboratory practice, and scientific communication. Together with PH4020 this course covers the majority of material typically found in a year-long introductory course. Credit cannot be earned for both PH4000 Physics Core: E&M and PH4120 Physics Core: E&M (Math Intensive).

  •      PH4130

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Physics
    Prerequisite(s): PH3500 Physics Core: Mechanics; PH4020 Physics Core: Mechanics (MI) or PH4240 AP Physics C Mechanics
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit OR One Physics credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    PH4130 Computational Physics *R*

    This course is designed to introduce the use of numerical methods to solve problems in physics and explore how physicists use large data sets to model new phenomena. Students will learn Python to utilize the power of computation in mathematical and data analysis. A prior knowledge of Python is not required as the course integrates computational techniques as new physics challenges arise. Skills developed in programming will be used in solving complex problems that require numerical methods for precise, quick, and efficient solutions. Topics will be varied and include examples in electromagnetism, particle physics, and gravitational waves. The reuse of code within a program and in other programs will be emphasized.

  •      PH4150/EE4150

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Engineering & Computer Science
    Subject: Engineering
    Prerequisite(s): PH4020 or PH3500
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Computer Science / Engineering credit OR One STEM credit OR One Physics credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    PH4150/EE4150 Elements of Satellite Design

    This is an interdisciplinary course focused on the applied science and engineering of small scale satellites. Students will apply physics principles and the engineering design process to consider fundamental elements for designing orbital systems that gather earth data through remote sensing. Physics topics commensurate with second semester physics such as orbital mechanics, energy analysis, waves, simple harmonic motion, and electromagnetism will be covered, as well as electrostatics and basic circuit design. 

  •      PH4150/EE4150

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Physics
    Prerequisite(s): PH4020 or PH3500
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Computer Science / Engineering credit OR One STEM credit OR One Physics credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    PH4150/EE4150 Elements of Satellite Design

    This is an interdisciplinary course focused on the applied science and engineering of small scale satellites. Students will apply physics principles and the engineering design process to consider fundamental elements for designing orbital systems that gather earth data through remote sensing. Physics topics commensurate with second semester physics such as orbital mechanics, energy analysis, waves, simple harmonic motion, and electromagnetism will be covered, as well as electrostatics and basic circuit design. 

  •      PH4180

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Physics
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of PH3500 with at least an A-, or completion of PH4020 with at least a B+ or completion of PH4240 with at least a B, or permission of chair of physics. Completion of MA4002.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Physics credit OR One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    PH4180 Astrophysics

    This course uses concepts and tools from physics to investigate astrophysical systems. Students will explore modules on Light and Spectroscopy, Newtonian Gravity, Stellar Interiors, and Special Relativity. Additional topics can vary based on student and instructor interests, but could include how observations are made, how computational models are used, how systems such as stars, galaxies, and the universe are formed, and communication in science. Students can also explore an independent research project.

  •      PH4190

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Physics
    Prerequisite(s): Physics 3500, Physics 4020 or equivalent
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit OR One Physics credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week and a lab

    PH4190 Biophysics

    Students will be given an introduction to the biophysics of cells and biomolecules. We will explore how Newton’s Laws, Electrostatics, Thermodynamics, and Optics can help us make sense of how biomolecules work and how cells move, apply forces and sense stimuli. We will start with a basic overview of the architecture of biology focusing primarily on cell and protein structure from a physics and engineering perspective. We will build from there and explore the physics of biological phenomena such as protein-protein interactions, cell motility, and ciliary propulsion. We will also study the mechanical, optical and electrical properties of biological materials. Course activities will include group problem solving, hands-on activities and laboratories, computational exercises, and small writing and presentation assignments. We will also make connections to current scientific literature and research work both here at UNC / Duke and in labs around the world. Note that this is a physics course, and does not take the place of biology or chemistry courses covering cell biology and biochemistry.

  •      PH4220

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Physics
    Prerequisite(s): Grades of A- or higher in PH3500 Physics Core: Mechanics and PH4000 Physics Core: EM and Waves, or B+ or higher in PH4020 Physics Core: Mechanics (Math Intensive) and PH4120 Physics Core: EM and Waves (Math Intensive), or B+ or higher in PH4241 AP Physics C: E&M with a modified exemption, or exemption from NCSSM core physics requirement, or permission of the Chair of Physics.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: January Term OR One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: January Term
    Meeting Times: Four week intensive January Term

    PH4220 Advanced Physics Problem Solving

    The course is for students who want to expand the range of physics problems they are able to solve. Students will solve problems in the areas of physics covered on the AP Physics 1 and AP Physics 2 syllabi, with emphasis on topics not covered in NCSSM's core physics courses. Students will be expected to learn content from independent textbook readings and come to class prepared to discuss the material and apply it to solve problems. Topics covered may include rotational mechanics, fluids, thermodynamics, wave motion, electromagnetism, optics, and other areas. Students will work in groups to solve problems in class and present their solutions, and will work additional problems for homework. Calculus is not required for problems addressed in this course. This course may be used to help students prepare to take the AP Physics 1 or AP Physics 2 exams, or to prepare for the International Physics Olympiad competition.

  •      PH4240

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Physics
    Prerequisite(s): Final grades of A- or higher in PH3500 Physics Core Mechanics and PH4000 Physics Core: Electromagnetism and Waves or final grades of B+ or higher in PH4020 Physics Core: Mechanics (MI) and PH4120 Physics Core: Electromagnetism and Waves (Math Intensive). Students with previous lab-based physics courses who wish to take AP-C Physics should read the FAQs for Junior Physics Placement or Senior Physics Placement for alternative ways to qualify for enrollment in this course.
    Corequisite(s): MA4042 Calculus I, MA4044 Calculus II with AP Exam Prep or MA4046 Calculus II
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit OR One Physics credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    PH4240 AP Physics C: Mechanics

    This course provides an in depth study of classical mechanics: Newton’s Laws, conservation of energy, conservation of momentum, angular momentum, rotational mechanics, oscillating systems and gravitational fields. There is a strong problem-solving emphasis throughout the course and a lab component. Calculus is used where needed and is treated at a level appropriate to students who are taking Calculus I. Completion of PH4240 may be used to prepare for the Mechanics portion of the AP C Physics examination.

  •      PH4241

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Physics
    Prerequisite(s): Final grade of B or higher in PH4240 AP Physics C: Mechanics, or modified exemption and final grade of B+ or higher in PH4120 Physics Core: Electromagnetism and Waves (Math Intensive), or exemption, and MA4044 Calculus II with AP Exam Prep or MA4046 Calculus II
    Corequisite(s): MA4044 Calculus II with AP Exam Prep or MA4046 Calculus II
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Physics credit OR One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    PH4241 AP Physics C: E&M

    This course provides a detailed study of electromagnetism. The course begins with an overview of electric forces and fields, Gauss' law, capacitance, and voltage. Later topics include electric circuits (R, RC, and RL), electromagnetism, Ampere's law, induction, and the Faraday/Lenz law. Emphasis is on the completion of the AP C Physics curriculum. There is a strong problem-solving emphasis and the course includes a lab component. Calculus is used where needed and is treated at a level appropriate to students who have taken Calculus I. Completion of this course may be used to prepare for the electricity and magnetism portion of the AP C Physics examination.

  •      PH4250

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Physics
    Prerequisite(s): Grades of A- or higher in PH3500 Physics Core: Mechanics and PH4000 Physics Core: Electromagnetism and Waves, or Grades of B+ or higher in PH4020 Physics Core: Mechanics (MI) and PH4120 Physics Core: Electromagnetism and Waves (MI), or completion of PH4241 AP Physics C: E&M, or exemption from NCSSM core physics requirement, or permission of the Chair of Physics.
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    PH4250 Modern Physics

    This course continues the Physics core sequence by surveying the physics developed since the start of the twentieth century. Topics are selected from special and general relativity, atomic and nuclear structure, particle- wave duality, quantum mechanics, elementary particles, and grand unified theories. The laboratory experience in this course emphasizes the use of the computer in both the collection and the analysis of laboratory data. Activities in this course are designed to encourage the development of the following skills: excellence in qualitative and quantitative problem solving, independent learning from the course textbooks, careful and thoughtful experimental habits in lab, and proficiency in writing lab reports. This course may not be offered every year.

  •      PH4260

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Physics
    Prerequisite(s): Grades of A- or higher in PH3500 Physics Core: Mechanics and PH4000 Physics Core: Electromagnetism and Waves, or Grades of B+ or higher in PH4020 Physics Core: Mechanics (MI) and PH4120 Physics Core: Electromagnetism and Waves (MI), or completion of PH4241 AP Physics C: E&M, or exemption from NCSSM core physics requirement, or permission of the Chair of Physics. MA4044 Calculus II with AP Exam Prep or MA4046 Calculus II
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    PH4260 Quantum Mechanics

    This course provides an introduction to the quantum mechanical world where objects can behave as both waves and particles. It complements PH4250 Modern Physics and goes into much more detail regarding the need for and development of quantum mechanics at the beginning of the 20th century. The course begins with an overview of wave and particle behaviors in classical mechanics and electromagnetism. When classical models fail to explain some behaviors of particles and electromagnetic waves, students learn how the early quantum models of Bohr, Planck, Einstein and others eventually led to the discovery of quantum mechanics in the 1920’s by de Broglie, Heisenberg, Schrodinger, Born and others. The course includes concepts and applications of the Schrodinger equation to phenomena such as spectroscopy and radioactivity. Students will also explore a contemporary topic in quantum mechanics of their choice (examples may include quantum computers, quantum teleportation, quantum dots, etc.). This course may not be offered every year.

  •      PH4920

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Physics
    Prerequisite(s): By application in the Fall of the Junior year.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: January Term
    Schedule Requirements Met: January Term
    Meeting Times: Two week intensive January Term

    PH4920 Research in Physics I (*R*)

    This is an advanced course for January Term junior students with the maturity, independence, and motivation necessary to conduct their own research project. Students learn the scientific method and experimental design before conducting a trial experiment on a small scale. Students then write a mini- literature review on the topic of interest to them. Throughout the term students read from the primary scientific literature and participate in discussion groups on current issues in biological research. 

    Students who are accepted and enrolled in Research in Physics are expected to complete the entire sequence of courses including participation in 3 weeks of summer research on campus.  This entire sequence includes 2 weeks of Jan Term in your junior year, Spring semester of your junior year, summer (3 weeks of SRIP) between the junior and senior year and Fall semester of your senior year. 

    Students must have a grade of B or higher to continue the sequence and have no major conduct violations to participate in SRIP.

    Fall 
    Jan Term 
    Spring 
    Summer 
    Jr Year 
    JTerm I
    Spring 
    SRIP
    Sr Year
    Fall

  •      PH4921

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Physics
    Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of the immersive two week JanTerm course PH4920 Research in Physics I. Students with Junior standing apply in the Fall for entry to the Research in Physics sequence.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit OR One Physics credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Eight periods per week and two labs

    PH4921 Research in Physics II (*R*)

    This is an advanced course for second semester junior students with the maturity, independence, and motivation necessary to conduct their own research project. Students learn the scientific method and experimental design before conducting a trial experiment on a small scale. Students write a literature review on a topic of interest to them. Students then write a detailed research proposal and defend it to a panel of their peers. If time permits, students begin to learn techniques and to gather data for their experiments. Throughout the term, students read from the primary scientific literature and participate in discussion groups on current issues in physics research. Based on the outcomes of the term's work, students are expected to participate in summer research programs on campus. 

    Students who are accepted and enrolled in Research in Physics are expected to complete the entire sequence of courses including participation in 3 weeks of summer research on campus.  This entire sequence includes 2 weeks of Jan Term in your junior year, Spring semester of your junior year, summer (3 weeks of SRIP) between the junior and senior year and Fall semester of your senior year. 

    Students must have a grade of B or higher to continue the sequence and have no major conduct violations to participate in SRIP.

    Fall 
    Jan Term 
    Spring 
    Summer 
    Jr Year 
    JTerm I
    Spring 
    SRIP
    Sr Year
    Fall

  •      PH4922

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Physics
    Prerequisite(s): PH4921 Research in Physics II, or permission of Chair of Physics.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Eight periods per week and two labs

    PH4922 Research in Physics III (*R*)

    Students continue work on their previous research to produce additional data and conduct statistical analysis, as needed. They may research extension questions based on their original work. Students write a formal research paper and prepare a formal presentation. Students are required to present their results at the NCSSM Research Symposium in the spring and are encouraged to present their research at the North Carolina Student Academy of Science competition and other competitions.

  •      RE1002

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Student Life
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Residential Education credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: Additional elective
    Meeting Times: One period per week

    RE1002 Cornerstone

    Using a holistic education approach of self-discovery, self-realization, and wellness, this course helps students integrate into the life and culture of NCSSM and to establish the foundation necessary for academic and personal success in the classroom, in relationships, and in community living at NCSSM and beyond. Topics include time management, conflict management and healthy relationships, diversity, and resume-writing and interview skills.

  •      RE1010

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Student Life
    Prerequisite(s): RE1002
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Residential Education credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: Additional elective
    Meeting Times: One period per week

    RE1010 Exploring MultiCultural Amer

    Students will explore issues of race, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, gender, sexual orientation, disability, religion and faith and their impact in the social world. Students will also reflect on their own experiences, identities, biases, and how each has shaped their own worldview.

  •      RE1012

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Student Life
    Prerequisite(s): RE1002
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Residential Education credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: Additional elective
    Meeting Times: One period per week

    RE1012 Public Speaking

    Public speaking aims to inform, convince, influence, persuade, or entertain a group of people. The development of public speaking skills, valuable in itself, can also contribute to one's self-confidence, organizational skills, listening skills, and anxiety-management. In this course, students learn to write and deliver effective speeches. This includes learning the effective use of presentation aids, supporting arguments, communication ethics, and speech organization.

  •      RE1016

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Student Life
    Prerequisite(s): RE1002
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Residential Education credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: Additional elective
    Meeting Times: One period per week

    RE1016 Marketing You

    This course utilizes discussion and cooperative learning experiences to help students identify their strengths and learn how to best market themselves in the professional world. Focus is on using social media as a tool to identify promising career options, writing an effective resume, and learning techniques for professional interviews.

  •      RE1018

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Student Life
    Prerequisite(s): RE1002
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Residential Education credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: Additional elective
    Meeting Times: One period per week

    RE1018 Excellence in Leadership

    As stated in the Disney Organizational Leadership (DOL) course description: “. . . as important as theory and application are to the learning process, it all begins with the heart and character of the leader.” Based on concepts from the (DOL) course, students assess their own leadership styles and practice various leadership techniques. Students examine the type of leadership required to create and maintain high levels of excellence on the individual level and in small group, organizational, and community environments.

  •      RE1020

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Student Life
    Prerequisite(s): RE1002
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Residential Education credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: Additional elective
    Meeting Times: One period per week

    RE1020 Financial Planning

    Many high school and college graduates find themselves in serious financial trouble and in a debt cycle that can be difficult to reverse, causing the deferment or loss of some of their plans and dreams. Learning some simple and sound money management skills during high school can help students take charge of their financial future and can help set them on the path to realizing their important life goals. In this course, students learn basic money management skills such as budgeting, borrowing, earnings, investing, financial services, identity protection, and insurance. We teach practical application of these skills that students can put to immediate use.

  •      RE1022

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Student Life
    Prerequisite(s): RE1002
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Residential Education credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: Additional elective
    Meeting Times: One period per week

    RE1022 College and Career Planning

    The course is designed to allow students to successfully transition from NCSSM to their future college or university environment. Designed to be taken in the third trimester junior year or the first trimester senior year, Transitioning to Higher Education prepares students through focusing on three key aspects of higher education: the college selection process, the college application process, and campus life. Lessons on the college selection process help students to identify types of colleges and universities, to understand how elements of a college or university may impact their educational experience, and to learn how to find colleges and universities that are a good fit for them. Lessons focused on the college application process are designed to help students understand deadlines and terms associated with the college application process, to connect students to resources to reduce costs, and to provide students an opportunity to gain experience developing applications and essays. Campus life lessons focus on the total cost of attending a college or university, programs on college campuses such as study abroad and living learning communities, and transitioning from the NCSSM experience to their unique college or university experience

  •      SE4001

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Physical Activity & Wellness
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One elective credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week

    SE4001 Emergency Care

    This course prepares students to recognize and respond appropriately to cardiac, breathing, and First Aid emergencies. Students learn skills necessary to give immediate first aid and CPR or breathing until more advanced medical personnel arrive and take over. We look at environmental conditions, mechanics and classification of injury, bloodborne pathogens and taking action. Along with the anatomy of injuries and preventive measures, students also learn how to take blood pressure, pulses and respiration. Along with learning the anatomy and immediate care of injuries and emergency situations of different sections of the body, we discuss shoulder, knee, elbow etc. The course considers equipment that could be applied to help reduce injuries along with devices to assist in caring for an individual, such as spine board and air splints. We conclude with concussion assessment. This is a hands on class where you will be palpating your own and your partner's body.

  •      SE4002

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Physical Activity & Wellness
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week and a lab

    SE4002 Introduction to Sports Injury Care and Management

    This course is designed for students interested in potentially pursuing a career as a Sports
    Medicine Physician, Physical Therapist, Athletic Trainer, Strength & Conditioning Coach,
    Research in Athletics or Chiropractor. This course takes a hands-on approach and includes
    learning a wide variety of taping, wrapping, and bracing techniques for injury prevention.
    Furthermore students will learn skills and techniques to be able to recognize, evaluate, and treat sports injuries. Additionally, students will also develop rehabilitation programs and plans for specific injuries. This course will focus largely on the prevention, recognition, evaluation, and rehabilitation of the lower body. Furthermore, students have the opportunity to become certified as a Professional Rescuer through the American Red Cross with this course. Lastly, students will complete and present a critically appraised topic on a Sports Medicine topic of their choice.

    A strong background in human anatomy is recommended for this course, but not required.

  •      SL1000

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Student Life
    Prerequisite(s): none
    Corequisite(s): none
    Graduation Requirements Met: None - Other
    Schedule Requirements Met: Not Applicable
    Meeting Times: One period per week

    SL1000 Service Learning

  •      SP3051

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week

    SP3051 Journeys into Spanish I

    Students embark on a journey of linguistic and cultural exploration as they take the first steps towards becoming proficient in Spanish. This course is for students who have not studied Spanish before or who have appropriate NCSSM placement. Students learn to negotiate meaning among individuals, interpret written and spoken meaning, and to present meaning via oral and written messages that focus on the themes of self, family, friends, and everyday activities in the present tense. Students will be able to greet people in Spanish, identify themselves, talk about classes and school life, discuss everyday activities, talk about family and friends, talk about pastimes,and make plans and invitations. Cultural aspects of the Spanish-speaking world are interwoven throughout the course. Web-based exercises, videos, and songs aid students in their acquisition of grammatical concepts, new vocabulary, and listening skills.

  •      SP3052

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): SP3051
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week

    SP3052 Journeys in Spanish II

    Students embark on a journey of linguistic and cultural exploration as they take the first steps towards becoming proficient in Spanish. This course is for students who have completed Journeys I or who have appropriate NCSSM placement. Students learn to negotiate meaning among individuals, interpret written and spoken meaning, and to present meaning via oral and written messages that focus on the themes of self, family, friends, and everyday activities in the present tense. Students also learn to address the same themes within an introduction to the past tense and begin to develop the ability to tell a story in the past. Students will be able to discuss and plan a vacation, talk about how they feel, talk about and describe clothing, express preferences in a store, negotiate and pay for items they buy, describe their daily routine and personal hygiene, and talk about and describe food and order food in a restaurant. Cultural aspects of the Spanish-speaking world are interwoven throughout the course. Web-based exercises, videos, and songs aid students in their acquisition of grammatical concepts, new vocabulary, and listening skills.

  •      SP3250

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week

    SP3250 Breakthroughs in Spanish

    Students will enrich their Spanish language knowledge through readings and interpretations of authentic texts in the target language. This course is for students with previous experience in the language and appropriate NCSSM placement. Over the course of the semester, students will reinforce grammar and vocabulary knowledge as well as deepen cultural knowledge of the Spanish-speaking world. By the end of the course, students will be able to decode level appropriate Spanish, read with sufficient accuracy and level appropriate fluency, find and interpret key ideas and details, and make inferences in the target language. Authentic texts, videos, and listening comprehension from the target language are the main modes of instruction. This course not only reviews material from the Journeys series, but stresses emphasis on applied language skills such as reading and speaking. By the end of the course, students will be able to have level-appropriate conversations and will have improved their writing skills in Spanish.

  •      SP3651

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): SP3052 or permission of the Dean of Humanities
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week

    SP3651 Navigating in Spanish I

    Students continue to navigate their linguistic and cultural journeys in Spanish. Students begin to read short stories and narratives and to comprehend a wider array of media produced in Spanish. Students also begin to develop understanding of nuances of the language. Students learn to negotiate meaning among individuals, interpret written and spoken meaning, and to present meaning via oral and written messages, primarily in the past tense. Students further develop their proficiency in the language by reading short texts, viewing video programs, and using the language in everyday conversational situations. Students will be able to express congratulations and gratitude and to talk about a variety of topics—including health and medical conditions and technology and electronics. Students continue to explore cultural aspects of the Spanish-speaking world. Students have access to web-based exercises and tutorials, video activities, individual and group projects, as well as film and documentaries, to aid them in the acquisition of grammatical concepts and new vocabulary.

  •      SP3652

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): SP3250, SP3651, or permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week

    SP3652 Navigating in Spanish II

    Students continue to navigate their linguistic and cultural journeys in Spanish. Students continue to read short stories and narratives and to comprehend a wider array of media produced in Spanish. Students also continue develop understanding of nuances of the language. Students learn to negotiate meaning among individuals, interpret written and spoken meaning, and to present meaning via oral and written messages, primarily in the past tense. Students will also begin to be able to express their wishes, wants, and desires by using the subjunctive mood. Students further develop their proficiency in the language by reading short texts, viewing video programs, and using the language in everyday conversational situations. Students will be able to describe their home or apartment, talk about household chores, give instructions, discuss environmental issues, express beliefs and opinions, give advice to others, and discuss daily errands and city life. Students continue to explore cultural aspects of the Spanish-speaking world. Students have access to web-based exercises and tutorials, video activities, individual and group projects, as well as film and documentaries, to aid them in the acquisition of grammatical concepts and new vocabulary.

  •      SP3850

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Dean of Humanities
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week

    SP3850 Explorations in Spanish with Topics

    Explorations in Spanish is an intermediate course for students who want to improve practical Spanish language skills while communicating about climate change. Through interviews, case studies, projects and authentic materials in Spanish, students will describe the effects of climate change on Spanish-speaking regions and be able to explain those effects from the perspective of various Spanish-speaking communities. Students will use Spanish to discuss course topics in class as well as to research and present class projects.

  •      SP4051

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): SP3652 or SP3850 or permission of the Dean of Humanities
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week

    SP4051 Advanced Spanish for Global Applications I

    In this level of Spanish, students' exploration into the language continues but expands to encompass elements that reflect the breadth and depth of the Spanish-speaking world and its cultures. Students will explore the culture, history, society, and literature of various Spanish-speaking peoples as they continue to acquire proficiency in the language. Through a rich program of original short films, audio activities, cultural readings, and authentic literary selections, students improve their understanding of spoken Spanish and develop their speaking, reading, and writing skills. Classroom activities emphasize communication, allowing students to interact and apply what they are learning. An accompanying web-based program provides additional language exercises. The course content is theme-focused and speaks to current as well as perennial issues, such as family, society, and the natural world and its protection. These topics inform class discussions and debates and serve as the basis for writing in Spanish.

  •      SP4052

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): SP4051 or permission of the Dean of Humanities
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week

    SP4052 Advanced Spanish for Global Applications II

    In this level of Spanish, students' exploration into language continues but expands to encompass elements that reflect the breadth and depth of the Spanish-speaking world and its cultures. Students will explore the culture, history, society, and literature of various Spanish-speaking peoples as they continue to acquire proficiency in the language. Through a rich program of original short films, audio activities, cultural readings, and authentic literary selections, students improve their understanding of spoken Spanish and continue to develop their speaking, reading, and writing skills. Classroom activities emphasize communication, allowing students to interact and apply what they are learning. An accompanying web-based program provides additional language exercises. The course content is theme-focused and speaks to current as well as perennial issues, such as family, society, and the natural world and its protection. These topics inform class discussions and debates and serve as the basis for writing in Spanish.

  •      SP4151

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Prerequisite(s): SP3052 or permission of the Dean of Humanities
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week

    SP4151 Navigating in Spanish I

    Students continue to navigate their linguistic and cultural journeys in Spanish. Students begin to read short stories and narratives and to comprehend a wider array of media produced in Spanish. Students also begin to develop understanding of nuances of the language. Students learn to negotiate meaning among individuals, interpret written and spoken meaning, and to present meaning via oral and written messages, primarily in the past tense. Students further develop their proficiency in the language by reading short texts, viewing video programs, and using the language in everyday conversational situations. Students will be able to express congratulations and gratitude and to talk about a variety of topics—including health and medical conditions and technology and electronics. Students continue to explore cultural aspects of the Spanish-speaking world. Students have access to web-based exercises and tutorials, video activities, individual and group projects, as well as film and documentaries, to aid them in the acquisition of grammatical concepts and new vocabulary.

  •      SP4152

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Prerequisite(s): SP4151 or permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week

    SP4152 Navigating in Spanish II

    Students continue to navigate their linguistic and cultural journeys in Spanish. Students continue to read short stories and narratives and to comprehend a wider array of media produced in Spanish. Students also continue develop understanding of nuances of the language. Students learn to negotiate meaning among individuals, interpret written and spoken meaning, and to present meaning via oral and written messages, primarily in the past tense. Students will also begin to be able to express their wishes, wants, and desires by using the subjunctive mood. Students further develop their proficiency in the language by reading short texts, viewing video programs, and using the language in everyday conversational situations. Students will be able to describe their home or apartment, talk about household chores, give instructions, discuss environmental issues, express beliefs and opinions, give advice to others, and discuss daily errands and city life. Students continue to explore cultural aspects of the Spanish-speaking world. Students have access to web-based exercises and tutorials, video activities, individual and group projects, as well as film and documentaries, to aid them in the acquisition of grammatical concepts and new vocabulary.

  •      SP4250

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Prerequisite(s): Placement test/Permission of the Dean of Humanities
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week and a lab

    SP4250 Spanish for Heritage Speakers

    Are you one of the more than 41 million people in the US who speak Spanish at home? Growing up speaking Spanish in the US is not like speaking it anywhere else! This course provides an opportunity to use your Spanish in an academic setting. Students will build on their existing language proficiency while reading, listening, writing, and speaking about history, linguistics, literature, and contemporary culture in the Spanish-speaking world. Topics may include: origins and evolution of Spanish, accents, dialects and regional varieties of Spanish spoken in more than 22 countries,  language justice, education, art, film, television, podcasts, literature, music, sports, and social media.

  •      SP4251

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): SP3652, SP3850, SP3900, or permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week

    SP4251 Topics in Advanced Spanish I: Sports and Culture in the Hispanosphere

    In this advanced level Spanish course, students' exploration into the language expands to encompass elements that reflect the breadth and depth of the Spanish-speaking world and its cultures. Classroom activities emphasize communication and interaction as students use Spanish to discuss, research, and present on topics derived from the course’s unique area of content focus. Whenever the course is offered, that focus varies and is announced when course offerings are published.

  •      SP4252

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): SP3652, SP3850, SP3900, or permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week and a lab

    SP4252 Topics in Advanced Spanish II

    In this advanced level Spanish course, students' exploration into the language expands to encompass elements that reflect the breadth and depth of the Spanish-speaking world and its cultures. Classroom activities emphasize communication and interaction as students use Spanish to discuss, research, and present on topics derived from the course’s unique area of content focus. Whenever the course is offered, that focus varies and is announced when course offerings are published.

  •      SP4252

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Prerequisite(s): SP3652, SP3850, SP4251, or permission of the Dean of Humanities
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week

    SP4252 Topics in Advanced Spanish II: Afro-Spanish Caribbeans and their Contributions

    Are you familiar with the term “Afro-Spanish Caribbeans”? Who are they? What are their origins? How have they shaped the history of the "New World"? This term refers to the descendants of enslaved Africans brought against their will to the "New World" by the Spaniards. This course will cover the experiences of the descendants of enslaved Africans in the islands now known as Cuba, Puerto Rico, and the Dominican Republic. Students will learn, explore, and recognize not only the contributions made by Afro-Spanish Caribbeans to the arts, literature, cuisine, sports, theater, music, science, and politics, but also to the history that transformed and shaped the construction of race and identity in the Caribbean. Join us for this exciting exploration of history, language, and cultural fusion!

  •      SP4253

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): SP3652, SP3850, SP3900, or permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Humanities credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week

    SP4253 Topics in Advanced Spanish III

    In this advanced level Spanish course, students' exploration into the language expands to encompass elements that reflect the breadth and depth of the Spanish-speaking world and its cultures. Classroom activities emphasize communication and interaction as students use Spanish to discuss, research, and present on topics derived from the course’s unique area of content focus. Whenever the course is offered, that focus varies and is announced when course offerings are published.

  •      SP4253

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages

    SP4253 Topics in Advanced Spanish III

    In this advanced level Spanish course, students' exploration into the language expands to encompass elements that reflect the breadth and depth of the Spanish-speaking world and its cultures. Classroom activities emphasize communication and interaction as students use Spanish to discuss, research, and present on topics derived from the courses unique area of content focus. Whenever the course is offered, that focus varies and is announced when course offerings are published.

  •      SP4300

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Prerequisite(s): Navigating in Spanish I, Placement, or permission of the Dean of Humanities
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week

    SP4300 Explorations in Spanish: Environmental Studies

    Explorations in Spanish is an intermediate course in which students improve their communication skills while studying a specific topic. In this course, students will study the environment throughout the Spanish-speaking world. Topics of study may include air quality, water access, energy production, food, conservation, and sustainability in Spanish-speaking communities. Through interviews, case studies, projects, and authentic materials in Spanish as well as a review of grammatical structures and vocabulary, students examine an important topic while also improving their communication skills. The course is conducted in Spanish and all work for the course is completed in Spanish. Students in this course typically begin at the Intermediate-low/mid level and can expect to improve their proficiency. The two Explorations courses (4300 and 4300) are NOT sequential, so students who place into this level may take either course.

  •      SP4310

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Prerequisite(s): Navigating in Spanish I, Placement, or permission of the Dean of Humanities
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week

    SP4310 Explorations in Spanish: Medical Spanish

    Explorations in Spanish is an intermediate course in which students improve their communication skills while studying a specific topic. In this course, students study medical Spanish and learn to apply it in a professional setting. This course emphasizes medical vocabulary but also includes a review and introduction of grammatical structures that are useful when communicating in a medical setting. The course also addresses cultural topics such as healthcare systems and healthcare values in various parts of the Spanish-speaking world. This course emphasizes applied language skills. Students are expected to participate in daily conversations, simulated patient interviews, and to complete research on a public health topic, among other assignments. Upon completion, students will have gained the necessary skills to complete intake forms, complete an initial patient interview, and communicate pre- and post-care to patients and family members in a culturally-appropriate way. Students in this course typically begin at the Intermediate-low/mid level and can expect to improve their proficiency. The two Explorations courses (4300 and 4300) are NOT sequential, so students who place into this level may take either course.

  •      SP4500

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Prerequisite(s): Placement test/Permission of the Dean of Humanities
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Two periods per week and a lab

    SP4500 Spanish for Heritage Speakers

    Are you one of the more than 41 million people in the US who speak Spanish at home? Growing up speaking Spanish in the US is not like speaking it anywhere else! This course provides an opportunity to use your Spanish in an academic setting. Students will build on their existing language proficiency while reading, listening, writing, and speaking about history, linguistics, literature, and contemporary culture in the Spanish-speaking world. Topics may include: origins and evolution of Spanish, accents, dialects and regional varieties of Spanish spoken in more than 22 countries,  language justice, education, art, film, television, podcasts, literature, music, sports, and social media.

  •      SP4510

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Prerequisite(s): Navigating in Spanish II, Explorations, placement, or permission of the Dean of Humanities
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week and a lab

    SP4510 Advanced Spanish: Gender and Sexuality in the Hispanosphere

    Gender and sexuality are two significant identifiers that both define our experiences in the world and are culturally contextualized. In this course, we will explore different conceptualizations, dynamics, celebrations, and tensions of gender and sexuality in the Spanish-speaking world. The intention is that students read widely, think critically, and explore different ways of experiencing the world. The course uses podcasts, film, short stories, poetry, music, videos, and a novel to explore topics such as queer identities, family structures, romantic relationships, friendships, intersectionality, beauty standards, non-binary language, and more. In this advanced level Spanish course, class time is devoted to discussion-based activities that deepen our understanding of issues, strengthen vocabulary, and build confidence with the Spanish language. This course encourages students to synthesize language, ideas, and culture in new and rich ways. Students in this course typically begin at the Intermediate-mid/high proficiency level and can expect to improve their proficiency. While there are supports built into the course as students continue to improve their language proficiency, this is more of a culture studies course taught in Spanish than a traditional language course. The various Advanced Spanish courses (SP4510, SP4520, SP4530, and SP4540) are NOT sequential, so students who place into this level may take any “Advanced Spanish” course.

  •      SP4520

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Prerequisite(s): Navigating in Spanish II, Explorations, placement, or permission of the Dean of Humanities
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week and a lab

    SP4520 Advanced Spanish: Sports and Culture in the Hispanosphere

    Fútbol may be known as the most popular sport around the world and in Spanish-speaking countries, but have you ever thought about these questions: What do we know about the original sports of the Americas? What sports are celebrated at the World Indigenous Games? Why did Nike name a running shoe after the Rarámuri people of Northern Mexico? Why have Spaniards like Rafael Nadal been so dominant in tennis? How are sports related to peace, ethics and economic development? What did the 1968 Olympics in Mexico City have to do with student protests there and politics farther afield? Why is baseball so popular in Spanish-speaking Caribbean countries like Cuba and the Dominican Republic? Why are Colombian cyclists so well represented at the Tour de France? What led indigenous women in Bolivia to start skateboarding collective ImillaSkate? Is bullfighting a sport? What about deportes urbanos like skateboarding, roller derby, and break dance? Find out about these and other fascinating questions as you become more proficient in reading, listening, speaking and writing in Spanish. This course encourages students to synthesize language, ideas, and culture in new and rich ways. Students in this course typically begin at the Intermediate-mid/high proficiency level and can expect to improve their proficiency. While there are supports built into the course as students continue to improve their language proficiency, this is more of a culture studies course taught in Spanish than a traditional language course. The various Advanced Spanish courses (SP4510, SP4520, SP4530, and SP4540) are NOT sequential, so students who place into this level may take any “Advanced Spanish” course.

  •      SP4530

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Prerequisite(s): Navigating in Spanish II, Explorations, placement, or permission of the Dean of Humanities
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week and a lab

    SP4530 Advanced Spanish: The Gothic and Supernatural in the Hispanosphere

    The gothic and supernatural often provide a window into a society's fears. For instance, stories of people vanishing in a house speaks to the disappeared in Argentina’s dictatorship, and a novel about a ghost town evokes the destruction experienced following the Mexican Revolution. With this in mind, this course will study fiction, poetry, film, and visual art from the Spanish-speaking world that feature creatures and worlds beyond our own reality in order to understand the cultures and histories that have produced them. We will examine the political context of these stories as well as their speculative structure. Through textual analysis and classes dedicated to developing grammar and vocabulary, students will improve their language skills while exploring innovative media. This course encourages students to synthesize language, ideas, and culture in new and rich ways. Students in this course typically begin at the Intermediate-mid/high proficiency level and can expect to improve their proficiency. While there are supports built into the course as students continue to improve their language proficiency, this is more of a culture studies course taught in Spanish than a traditional language course. The various Advanced Spanish courses (SP4510, SP4520, SP4530, and SP4540) are NOT sequential, so students who place into this level may take any “Advanced Spanish” course.

  •      SP4540

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Prerequisite(s): Navigating in Spanish II, Explorations, placement, or permission of the Dean of Humanities
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week and a lab

    SP4540 Advanced Spanish: Afro-Latino and Caribbean Studies

    This course is an exploration of Afro-Latino and Caribbean Studies that focuses on the experiences, culture, literature, music, art, history, language, and contributions of people of African descent in Latin America and the Caribbean. It explores the rich cultural expressions of Afro-Latino and Caribbean communities through a variety of genres, including short stories, poetry, plays, documentaries, songs, articles, short films, and painting. Students will have the opportunity to read poetry from authors such as Nicolás Guillén and Luis Pales Matos and analyze genres of music like bachata, salsa, merengue, and Afro-Latin jazz that have strong African influences. Understanding the historical background of the transatlantic slave trade is crucial for this course. Thousands of Africans were forcibly transported to the Americas, contributing to the formation of diverse Afro-descendant communities. In this Advanced Spanish class, the students will develop an advanced vocabulary foundation, improved reading comprehension, and strengthen their grammar structure. This course encourages students to synthesize language, ideas, and culture in new and rich ways. Students in this course typically begin at the Intermediate-mid/high proficiency level and can expect to improve their proficiency. While there are supports built into the course as students continue to improve their language proficiency, this is more of a culture studies course taught in Spanish than a traditional language course. The various Advanced Spanish courses (SP4510, SP4520, SP4530, and SP4540) are NOT sequential, so students who place into this level may take any “Advanced Spanish” course.

  •      SP4651

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): SP4052 or permission of the Dean of Humanities
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week and a lab

    SP4651 Readings in Spanish with Topics

    This course encourages students to synthesize language, ideas, and culture in new and rich ways. Conducted entirely in Spanish, this course is designed to serve as a bridge between language study and literature. The course is an exploration of Hispanic literature, culture, and society through a variety of genres, including short stories, poetry, plays, films, the arts, and brief critical essays. Students develop an advanced vocabulary and improved reading comprehension. They discuss and write about the issues and themes presented in the readings as they explore different points of view and forms of creative expression. Students are invited to participate in the creative process by transforming their responses to assigned readings into drawings, paintings, songs, dances, photography, collages, or any other previously approved creative form of their choosing. Students develop their writing skills in personal and descriptive narratives as well as essays that compare and contrast, critique, and persuade. They learn to edit their writing through discussion with the instructor, peer editing, by using an editing key, and through rewrites. Students review grammatical structures and make oral presentations.

  •      SP4652

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): SP4651 or permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week and a lab

    SP4652 Advanced Readings in Spanish with Topics

    This course encourages students to continue to synthesize language, ideas, and culture in new and rich ways. Conducted entirely in Spanish, this course is designed to serve as a bridge between language study and literature. The course is an exploration of Hispanic literature, culture, and society through a variety of genres, including short stories, poetry, plays, films, the arts, and brief critical essays. Students develop an advanced vocabulary and improved reading comprehension and higher thinking skills in Spanish. Students discuss and write about the issues and themes presented in the readings as they explore different points of view and forms of creative expression. Students are invited to participate in the creative process by transforming their responses to assigned readings into drawings, paintings, songs, dances, photography, collages, or any other previously approved creative form of their choosing. Students develop their writing skills in personal and descriptive narratives as well as essays that compare and contrast, critique, and persuade. They learn to edit their writing through discussion with the instructor, peer editing, by using an editing key, and through rewrites. Students review grammatical structures and make oral presentations.

  •      SP4851

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): SP4652 or permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week and a lab

    SP4851 Advanced Readings in Spanish with Topics I

    Literature in Spanish encompasses writers from Latin America, Spain, and the United States. Reading this literature opens a window into the minds of Spanish-speaking peoples and their cultures. In this course, we invite students to explore this fascinating world and to experience the richness, depth, and variety of its literary expression. Our knowledge of the language prepares us to better appreciate some of the great contributions to world literature, both modern and classical, by writers from all corners of the Spanish-speaking world. Conducted entirely in Spanish, this courses are designed for students with a particularly strong background in Spanish language, reading, and writing. Students explore topics in literature and culture that are beyond the standard curriculum. They read from a variety of genres such as the short story, poetry, plays, essays, and the novel as well as articles related to topics ranging from the practical to the abstract. They develop intensive reading strategies and a more advanced vocabulary, and they write persuasive essays that defend a thesis. Students continue to review advanced grammatical topics and continue to develop their discussion skills in Spanish. Students make oral presentations in Spanish and complete a paper or independent project in Spanish on a topic of interest.

  •      SP4852

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): SP4851 or permission of the Dean of Humanities
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week and a lab

    SP4852 Advanced Readings in Spanish with Topics II

    Literature in Spanish encompasses writers from Latin America, Spain, and the United States. Reading this literature opens a window into the minds of Spanish-speaking peoples and their cultures. In this course, we invite students to explore this fascinating world and to experience the richness, depth, and variety of its literary expression. Our knowledge of the language prepares us to better appreciate some of the great contributions to world literature, both modern and classical, by writers from all corners of the Spanish-speaking world. Conducted entirely in Spanish, this courses are designed for students with a particularly strong background in Spanish language, reading, and writing. Students explore topics in literature and culture that are beyond the standard curriculum. They read from a variety of genres such as the short story, poetry, plays, essays, and the novel as well as articles related to topics ranging from the practical to the abstract. They develop intensive reading strategies and a more advanced vocabulary, and they write persuasive essays that defend a thesis. Students continue to review advanced grammatical topics and continue to develop their discussion skills in Spanish. Students make oral presentations in Spanish and complete a paper or independent project in Spanish on a topic of interest.

  •      SS4000

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: History & Social Sciences
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One elective credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week

    SS4000 International Relations

    Patterns of change and continuity characterize international relations across time. City-state interactions in ancient Greece resemble dynamics of great power relations today, such as those between the United States and China. However, we also find that new technologies (nuclear and cyber weapons,) shared threats (climate change and terrorism,) and the spread of liberal democracy alter these interactions in sometimes counterintuitive ways. International Relations (IR) introduces the formal study of how countries interrelate, focusing on the broad subject areas of international security and economics. In this course, we learn about the primary actors, their various instruments, and patterns of interactions. Students acquire a conceptual toolbox for framing international issues and events and analyzing their causes and consequences. The course challenges students to critically assess the philosophical and ideological underpinnings of major IR schools of thought. Course activities include a group project investigating a contemporary conflict, the application of IR theory to current events, a documentary viewing, and regular discussion of international news.

  •      SS4020

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: History & Social Sciences
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One elective credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week

    SS4020 Sociology

    In this course, students gain an understanding of the phenomenon we call "society." Students explore the impact of society on the individual, the various levels of power and inequality in society, and the roles of groups, organizations, and multinational corporations. We discuss the various stages of social change over the course of history, beginning with a discussion of sociological theories and research methods. Often, the theoretical and methodological basis for the assertions in our readings may appear to be “common sense,” but through a detailed examination, we find that this is not the case. According to Berger, "The first wisdom of sociology is this—things are not what they seem. This, too, is a deceptively simple statement. It ceases to be simple after a while. Social reality turns out to have many layers.” We explore the forces that influence us and thus examine our conception of the world around us: the taken-for-granted reality and all its implications.

  •      SS4030

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: History & Social Sciences
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One elective credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week

    SS4030 Medical Sociology

    In this course, students gain an understanding of the social science of medicine—that is, the study of the social causes and consequences of health and illness. We begin with a review of the history of medical care in the United States and the world in general. We then investigate the social facets of health and disease, the functions of healthcare organizations, the relationship of healthcare delivery systems to other social organizations, the social behavior of healthcare practitioners and consumers, social policies toward health, and the relationship of health services in the United States to other countries.

  •      SS4040

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: History & Social Sciences
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None,None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One elective credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week

    SS4040 Topics in Psychology: Psychological Disorders

    When we say someone is “so OCD” what are we really saying, and should we be saying it? (Spoiler alert: No!) Are Schizophrenia and Dissociative Identity Disorder the same thing and did they portray them correctly in that movie I saw? (Also no!) This course is designed to address common misconceptions regarding mental health and will explore the definitions and experiences of various mental health conditions in comparison and contrast to the way that they are portrayed in various forms of popular media and in personal memoirs. The course will examine common mental health concerns such as mood disorders, anxiety disorders, schizophrenia, and personality disorders, and will focus on understanding diagnosis, causes, and treatments for each type of concern. We will consider how these issues show up both for the “average” person as well as the range of diversity of mental health presentations across identity groups. Course activities will include case studies, discussion groups, reading mental health memoirs, and watching films that portray characters with mental illnesses. Students will have the opportunity to demonstrate their learning in multiple formats, such as through projects and presentations that focus on assessing understanding of mental health conditions as well as realistic and empathetic portrayals of these issues.

  •      SS4050

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: History & Social Sciences
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One elective credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week

    SS4050 AP Psychology

    AP Psychology introduces students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings. We explore a range of issues, concerns, and specialties in psychology. Initially, we spend a considerable amount of time discussing the psychological perspective and the role of theory and research in psychology. Then we move into an in-depth study of key components of psychology. We learn about some of the explorations and discoveries made by psychologists over the past century, and we compare, contrast, and assess some of the differing approaches adopted by psychologists, including biological, behavioral, cognitive, humanistic, psychodynamic, and sociocultural perspectives. Most importantly, we come to an understanding and appreciation of how psychologists think and the kind of critical analyses of human behavior that psychologists espouse and model in their words and actions. This course prepares students for the AP Psychology exam.

  •      SS4060

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: History & Social Sciences
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One elective credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods and a lab OR two 100-min. evening periods

    SS4060 AP Microeconomics

    This course offers students an opportunity for immersion in a fascinating discipline and in logical thinking. This immersive process involves an introduction to general economic theory and more specific microeconomic theory. Graphical analysis will play a major role in understanding the relationship between economic variables. The course will frequently consider international applications and scenarios while studying microeconomic topics related to income inequality, factor market dynamics, labor costs, and global entrepreneurship. Students pursue this topic through case studies or strategic problems involving pricing issues in product and factor markets, competition across various market structures, and industrial and social regulation within both historic and contemporary environments. Thus, the curriculum content and processes of analyses are organized around holistic, ill-structured, real-world "problems,” and case studies. These experiences are designed to be of an integrated and multi-layered nature and provide opportunities to discover and apply the microeconomics concepts from our readings and discussions. In taking this consciously constructivist approach, we integrate other disciplines into the study of microeconomics. Elements from the fields of psychology, history, political science, and mathematics all have roles to play as we propose resolutions to our microeconomic problems and case studies.

  •      SS4070

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: History & Social Sciences
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One elective credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods and a lab OR two 100-min. evening periods

    SS4070 AP Macroeconomics

    This course offers students an opportunity for immersion in a fascinating discipline and in logical thinking. This immersive process involves an introduction to general economic theory and more specific macroeconomic theory. Graphical analysis will play a major role in understanding the relationship between economic variables. The course will frequently consider international applications and scenarios while studying macroeconomic topics such as productivity measurement, fiscal and monetary policy, interest rates, inflation, and unemployment. Students pursue these topics through case studies or strategic problems involving national macroeconomic policies for a globalized marketplace environment. Thus, the curriculum content and processes of analyses are organized around holistic, ill-structured, real-world "problems,” and case studies. These experiences are designed to be of an integrated and multi-layered nature and provide opportunities to discover and apply the microeconomics concepts from our readings and discussions. In taking this consciously constructivist approach, we integrate other disciplines into the study of macroeconomics. Elements from the fields of psychology, history, political science, and mathematics all have roles to play as we propose resolutions to our macroeconomic problems and case studies.

  •      SS4081

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: History & Social Sciences
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One elective credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods and a lab OR two 100-min. evening periods

    SS4081 Topics in History and Social Science I

    This course offers students the opportunity for deeper exploration of a particular area of history or social science. Students increase their knowledge of the subject by reading both primary and secondary sources. Students hone their critical thinking and communications skills by participating actively in seminar-style discussions, by writing academic essays, and by giving class presentations. The focus, whenever the course is offered, varies and is announced when the course offerings are published.

  •      VS1014

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Physical Activity & Wellness
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Physical Activity credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: Additional elective
    Meeting Times: Practices are typically M-F 4:30-6:30p. Competitions vary.

    VS1014 Men's Basketball

  •      VS1016

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Physical Activity & Wellness
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Physical Activity credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: Additional elective
    Meeting Times: Practices are typically M-F 4:30-6:30p. Competitions vary.

    VS1016 Women's Basketball

  •      VS1018

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Physical Activity & Wellness
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Physical Activity credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: Additional elective
    Meeting Times: Practices are typically M-F 4:30-6:30p. Competitions vary.

    VS1018 Men's Swimming

  •      VS1020

    School: NCSSM Durham
    Dept: Physical Activity & Wellness
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Physical Activity credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: Additional elective
    Meeting Times: Practices are typically M-F 4:30-6:30p. Competitions vary.

    VS1020 Women's Swimming

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  • AR4100 Drawing
  • AR4110 Painting
  • AR4310 Digital Photography
  • AR4320 Art and Technology
  • AR4330 Art, Philosophy, and the Creative Habit
  • AR4500 Advanced Drawing
  • AR4510 Advanced Painting
  • AR4520 Advanced Studio Art
  • AS4051 American Studies I
  • AS4052 American Studies II
  • BI3560 Sports Kinesiology
  • BI3580 Classical Genetics (*M*)
  • BI3640 Developmental Biology (*R*)
  • BI3700 Evolution
  • BI3900 Res Exp-Biology (*R*)
  • BI4010 Anatomy & Physiology
  • BI4020 Ecology (*R*)
  • BI4030 Environmental Science (*R*)
  • BI4040 Climate Change Biology (*M*)
  • BI4110 Molecular Genetics (*R*)
  • BI4120 Population Genetics (*M*)
  • BI4130 Aquatic Ecology (*R*)
  • BI4140 Molecular & Cellular Biol
  • BI4160 Neuroscience (*R*)
  • BI4200 Immunology (*R*)
  • BI4210 AP Biology (I) (*R*)
  • BI4211 AP Biology (II) (*R*)
  • BI4920 Research in Biology I (*R*)
  • BI4921 Research in Biology II (*R*)
  • BI4922 Research in Biology III (*R*)
  • CH3125 Computational Chemistry (*R*)
  • CH3500 Chemistry Core I - Atoms & Molecules
  • CH3900 Research Experience in Chemistry (*R*)
  • CH4000 Chemistry Core II - Reactions & Energy
  • CH4020 AP Chemistry (I): Atoms & Molecules (*M*)
  • CH4120 AP Chemistry (II): Kinetics & Energy
  • CH4130 Organic Chemistry
  • CH4140 Environmental Chem (*R*)
  • CH4150 Polymer Chemistry
  • CH4170/PH4170 Electrochemistry: Batteries, Fuel Cells and Solar Cells
  • CH4170/PH4170 Electrochemistry: Batteries, Fuel Cells and Solar Cells
  • CH4210 Introduction to Applied Chemistry and Engineering
  • CH4270 Analytical Chemistry
  • CH4280 Materials Chemistry
  • CH4290 Biochemistry (*R*)
  • CH4910 Research Computational Sci I
  • CH4910 Research Computational Sci I
  • CH4911 Research Computational Sci II
  • CH4920 Research Chem I (*R*)
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  • CH4922 Research Chem III (*R*)
  • CN3051 Journeys into Chinese I
  • CN3052 Journeys into Chinese II
  • CN3651 Navigating in Chinese + Global Understanding I
  • CN3652 Navigating in Chinese + Global Understanding II
  • CN4051 Advanced Chinese I
  • CN4052 Advanced Chinese II
  • CN4161 Navigating in Chinese + Global Understanding II
  • CN4162 Navigating in Chinese + Global Understanding I
  • CN4250 Chinese for Heritage Speakers
  • CN4351 Explorations of Chinese I
  • CN4351 Explorations of Chinese I
  • CN4352 Explorations in Chinese II
  • CN4500 Chinese for Heritage Speakers
  • CN4651 Readings in Chinese with Topics I
  • CN4652 Readings in Chinese with Topics
  • CN4851 AP Chinese Language and Culture I
  • CN4852 AP Chinese Language and Culture II
  • CN4951 Advanced Readings in Chinese with Topics I
  • CN4952 Advanced Readings in Chinese with Topics II
  • CS4020 Web Development
  • CS4040 Game Design and Simulation
  • CS4070/AR4070 Art, Technology, and Computing
  • CS4110/EE4110 Introductory Robotics
  • CS4110/EE4110 Introductory Robotics
  • CS4120 Computing for Everyone
  • CS4200/MA4200 Cryptography
  • CS4200/MA4200 Cryptography
  • CS4230 Networks and the Web
  • CS4270 Fundamentals of Object-Oriented Design
  • CS4320 Machine Learning
  • CS4330 Server-Side Development
  • CS4350 Data Structures and Algorithms
  • CS4380 Algorithms
  • CS4400/EE4400: Robotics Design for Competition
  • CS4400/EE4400: Robotics Design for Competition
  • CS4900 Advanced Computer Science Topics
  • CS4920 Advanced Computer Science Topics
  • DR4101 Theater Performance Workshop: Scene Study and Choice
  • DR4102 Theater Performance Workshop: Unacting and Movement
  • EE3080 History of Engin'g & Tech
  • EE3100 CAD/CAM
  • EE3620 Engineering the Modern
  • EE3900 Research Experience in Engineering and Computer Science
  • EE4000 Mechanical Engineering
  • EE4020 Electrical Engineering
  • EE4040 Architecture
  • EE4080 Biomedical Engineering
  • EE4100 Introductory Robotics
  • EE4140 Aerospace Engineering
  • EE4145 Rocketry Design for Competition
  • EE4160 Civil Engineering
  • EE4180 Environmental Engineering
  • EE4200 Digital Agriculture and Engineering
  • EE4300 Topics In Engineering - Robotics Design
  • EE4520 Biomedical Instrumentation
  • EE4540 Statics
  • EE4560 Circuits
  • EN4200 African Studies: Pre-colonial Africa
  • EN4210 African Studies: Modern Africa
  • EN4211 East Asian Studies I
  • EN4212 East Asian Studies II
  • EN4215 Asian American Studies
  • EN4220 African Studies: North Africa and the Middle East
  • EN4231 Latin American Studies I
  • EN4232 Latin American Studies II
  • EN4233 Latin American Studies III
  • EN4234 Latin American Literature and Culture
  • EN4241 Western European Cultural Studies I
  • EN4242 Western European Cultural Studies II
  • EN4251 Western Civilizations I: Wisdom, Revelation, Reason, and Doubt
  • EN4252 Western Civilizations II: Wisdom, Revelation, Reason, and Doubt
  • EN4300 Creative Writing
  • EN4310 Contemporary African-American Literature
  • EN4320 Women's Literature across the Globe
  • EN4330: Ecocriticism
  • EN4400 AI in Science Fiction
  • EN4410 British Literature and Culture
  • EN4420 Classical Myth: Epic and Tragedy
  • EN4430 Modern World Fiction
  • EN4440 Philosophy and Literature in the Twentieth Century
  • EN4450 Shakespeare Now
  • EN4460 Southern Studies
  • EN4470 STEM and the Stage
  • EN4481 Topics in Literature I
  • EN4482 Topics in Literature II
  • EN4483 Topics in Literature III
  • EN4484 Topics in Literature IV
  • EN4600 Research Experience in the Humanities
  • EN4610 Research in the Humanities
  • FR3051 Journeys into French I
  • FR3052 Journeys into French II
  • FR3651 Navigating in French I
  • FR3652 Navigating in French II
  • FR4051 Advanced French for Global Applications
  • FR4052 Advanced French for Global Applications II
  • FR4151 Navigating in French I
  • FR4152 Navigating in French II
  • FR4300 Advanced French for Global Applications
  • FR4510 Modern French Readings and Media
  • FR4651 Modern French Readings and Media I
  • FR4652 Modern French Readings and Media
  • HU4300 Whose America? Immigrant Experiences, 1910-present
  • HU4400 Black Studies
  • HU4405 American Indian and Indigenous Studies
  • HU4410 Critical Race Theory
  • HU4411 Critical Legal Studies
  • HU4420 Digital Humanities
  • HU4430 Ethics of AI
  • HU4440 Film Studies
  • HU4445 Introduction to Western Thought
  • HU4450 Race, Leadership, and Ethics
  • HU4460 Topics in Humanities I
  • HU4461 Topics in Humanities II
  • HU4470 Topics in the Study of Religion
  • HU4480 Topics in American Studies: Asian American Studies
  • HU4490 Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
  • JA3051 Journeys into Japanese I
  • JA3052 Journeys into Japanese II
  • JA3651 Navigating in Japanese I
  • JA3652 Navigating in Japanese II
  • JA4151 Navigating in Japanese I
  • JA4152 Navigating in Japanese II
  • LA3051 Latin Elements I
  • LA3052 Latin Elements II
  • LA3650 Latin Boot Camp
  • LA4050 Caesar in Gaul and Britannia
  • LA4651 Sallust and Cicero I
  • LA4652 Sallust and Cicero II
  • LA4661 Ovid's Metamorphoses I
  • LA4662 Ovid's Metamorphoses II
  • MA1000 Precalculus Co-Requisite
  • MA1012 Calculus Ib Exam Prep
  • MA1030 Calculus Co-Requisite
  • MA1044 Calculus II Exam Prep
  • MA3550 Modeling with Matrices
  • MA3990 Precalculus I
  • MA3992 Precalculus II
  • MA4000 Precalculus & Modeling w/ Advanced Topics I
  • MA4002 Precalculus & Modeling w/ Advanced Topics II
  • MA4010 Biocalculus
  • MA4012 Calculus Ia
  • MA4014 Calculus Ib with AP Exam Prep
  • MA4016 Calculus Ib