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  • AB3051 Journeys into Arabic I
  • AB3051x Journeys into Arabic I
  • AB3052 Journeys into Arabic II
  • AB3651 Navigating in Arabic I
  • AB3652 Navigating in Arabic II
  • AR4100 Drawing
  • AR4120 Ceramics
  • AR4130 Sculpture and 3D Design
  • AR4210 Open Studio
  • AR4310 Digital Photography
  • AR4520 Advanced Studio Art
  • AS4051 American Studies I
  • AS4052 American Studies II
  • BI3580 Classical Genetics (*M*)
  • BI3900 Reseach Experience in Biology
  • BI4010 Anatomy & Physiology
  • BI4020 Ecology (*R*)
  • BI4030 Environmental Science (*R*)
  • BI4130 Aquatic Ecology
  • BI4140 Molecular & Cellular Biol
  • BI4160 Neuroscience (*R*)
  • BI4210 AP Biology (I) (*R*)
  • BI4211 AP Biology (II) (*R*)
  • BI4920 Research in Biology I (*R*)
  • BI4921 Research in Biology II (*R*)
  • BI4922 Research in Biology III (*R*)
  • CH3500 Chemistry Core - Atoms & Molecules
  • CH3900 Research Experience in Chemistry (*R*)
  • CH4000 Chemistry Core - Reactions & Energy
  • CH4020 AP Chemistry (I): Atoms & Molecules (*M*)
  • CH4120 AP Chemistry (II): Kinetics & Energy
  • CH4130 Organic Chemistry
  • CH4140 Environmental Chem (*R*)
  • CH4920 Research Chem I (*R*)
  • CN3051 Journeys into Chinese I
  • CN3052 Journeys into Chinese II
  • CN3651 Navigating in Chinese + Global Understanding I
  • CN3652 Navigating in Chinese + Global Understanding II
  • CN4250 Explorations in Chinese for Heritage Speakers
  • CN4652 Readings in Chinese with Topics
  • CS4120 Computing for Everyone
  • CS4230 Networks and the Web
  • CS4250 Data Visualization
  • CS4270 Fundamentals of Object-Oriented Design
  • CS4300 Topics in Computer Science: Robotics Design for Competition
  • CS4320 Machine Learning
  • CS4330 Server-Side Development
  • CS4350 Data Structures and Algorithms
  • CS4920 Advanced Computer Science Topics
  • DR4101 Theater Performance Workshop
  • DR4102 Theater Performance Workshop
  • EE3100 CAD/CAM
  • EE4000 Mechanical Engineering
  • EE4020 Electrical Engineering
  • EE4080 Biomedical Engineering
  • EE4100 Introductory Robotics
  • EE4160 Civil Engineering
  • EE4180 Environmental Engineering
  • EE4200 Digital Agriculture and Engineering
  • EE4300 Topics In Engineering - Robotics Design
  • EN4300 Creative Writing
  • EN4425 Greek Drama and Performance
  • EN4430 Modern World Fiction
  • EN4440 AI in Science Fiction
  • EN4481 Topics in Literature I
  • EN4482 Topics in Literature II
  • EN4600 Research Experience in the Humanities
  • EN4610 Research in the Humanities
  • FR3651 Navigating in French I
  • FR3652 Navigating in French II
  • FR4051 Advanced French for Global Applications I
  • FR4652 Modern French Readings and Media
  • HU4400 Black Studies
  • HU4405 American Indian and Indigenous Studies
  • HU4420 Digital Humanities
  • HU4435 Bioethics
  • HU4440 Film Studies
  • HU4460 Topics in Humanities I
  • HU4461 Topics in Humanities II
  • HU4462 Topics in Humanities III
  • HU4470 Topics in the Study of Religion: The Pursuit of Meaning
  • HU4490 Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
  • MA1000 Precalculus Corequisite
  • MA1030 Calculus Corequisite
  • MA1044 Calculus II Exam Prep
  • MA4000 Precalculus & Modeling w/ Advanced Topics I
  • MA4002 Precalculus & Modeling w/ Advanced Topics II
  • MA4030 AP Calculus BC w/ Advanced Topics I
  • MA4032 AP Calculus BC w/ Advanced Topics II
  • MA4042 Calculus I
  • MA4044 Calculus II w/AP Prep
  • MA4046 Calculus II
  • MA4050 Modeling with Differential Equations
  • MA4060 Multivariable Calculus
  • MA4110 Foundations of Data Science
  • MA4250 History of Mathematics
  • MA4260 Introduction to Operations Research
  • MA4320 Linear Algebra with Applications
  • MA4330 Non-Euclidean Geometry
  • MA4340 Topics in Mathematics
  • MA4500 Graph Theory with REX Math
  • MA4510 Research in Mathematics
  • MA4512 Research in Mathematics II
  • MR3080 Mentorship: Foundations in Research
  • MR4050a Mentorship: Senior Research I
  • MR4051 Mentorship: Senior Research II
  • MU3500 Classical Piano and Guitar
  • MU4100 Chorale
  • MU4120 Jazz Performance Workshop
  • MU4140 Topics in Music Performance I: Steel Drums and Percussion Ensemble
  • MU4150 Topics in Music Performance II: Solo Repertoire and Performance (Woodwind, Brass, Strings, Pe
  • MU4160 Music Performance Ensemble
  • MU4170 Topics in Music Performance III: Solo Repertoire and Performance (Vocal)
  • MU4300 Music Theory and Composition
  • MU4310 AP Music Theory
  • PA1008 Self Defense
  • PA1009 Hiking
  • PA1020 Fit for Life
  • PH3040 Astronomy
  • PH3500 Physics Core: Mechanics
  • PH3920 Waves Sound, and Optics
  • PH4000 Physics Core: E&M
  • PH4020 Physics Core: Mechanics (Math Intensive) (*M*)
  • PH4120 Physics Core: E&M (Math Intensive) (*M*)
  • PH4130 Computational Physics
  • PH4180 Astrophysics (*R*)
  • PH4240 AP Physics C: Mechanics
  • PH4241 AP Physics C: E&M
  • PH4920 Research in Physics I (*R*)
  • PH4921 Research in Physics II (*R*)
  • PH4922 Research in Physics III (*R*)
  • RE1002 Cornerstone
  • RE1010 Exploring MultiCultural Amer
  • RE1012 Public Speaking
  • RE1016 Marketing You
  • RE1018 Excellence in Leadership
  • RE1020 Financial Planning
  • RE1022 College and Career
  • SE4001 Emergency. Care
  • SE4001 Emergency. Care
  • SP3051 Journeys into Spanish I
  • SP3052 Journeys in Spanish II
  • SP3250 Breakthroughs in Spanish
  • SP3651 Navigating in Spanish I
  • SP3652 Navigating in Spanish II
  • SP3850 Explorations in Spanish with Topics
  • SP4250 Spanish for Heritage Speakers
  • SP4251 Topics in Advanced Spanish: Gender and Sexuality in the Spanish-Speaking World
  • SP4252 Topics in Advanced Spanish: The Gothic and Supernatural in the Spanish-Speaking World
  • SP4253 Topics in Advanced Spanish III
  •      AB3051

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    AB3051 Journeys into Arabic I

    Students embark on a journey of linguistic and cultural exploration as they take the first steps towards becoming proficient in Arabic. This course is for students who have not studied Arabic before or who have appropriate NCSSM placement. Students learn to negotiate meaning among individuals, interpret written and spoken meaning, and to present meaning via oral and written messages that focus on the themes of self, family, friends, and everyday activities in the present tense. Students will be able to greet people in Arabic, identify themselves, talk about classes and school life, discuss everyday activities, talk about family and friends, talk about pastimes, and make plans and invitations. Cultural aspects of the Arabic-speaking world are interwoven throughout the course. Web-based exercises, videos, and songs aid students in their acquisition of grammatical concepts, new vocabulary, and listening skills.

  •      AB3051x

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week

    AB3051x Journeys into Arabic I

    Students embark on a journey of linguistic and cultural exploration as they take the first steps towards becoming proficient in Arabic. This course is for students who have not studied Arabic before or who have appropriate NCSSM placement. Students learn to negotiate meaning among individuals, interpret written and spoken meaning, and to present meaning via oral and written messages that focus on the themes of self, family, friends, and everyday activities in the present tense. Students will be able to greet people in Arabic, identify themselves, talk about classes and school life, discuss everyday activities, talk about family and friends, talk about pastimes, and make plans and invitations. Cultural aspects of the Arabic-speaking world are interwoven throughout the course. Web-based exercises, videos, and songs aid students in their acquisition of grammatical concepts, new vocabulary, and listening skills.

  •      AB3052

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Prerequisite(s): AB3051 Journeys into Arabic I or permission of Dean of Humanities.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week

    AB3052 Journeys into Arabic II

    Students embark on a journey of linguistic and cultural exploration as they continue to take the first steps towards becoming proficient in Arabic. This course is for students who have completed Journeys I or who have appropriate NCSSM placement. Students learn to negotiate meaning among individuals, interpret written and spoken meaning, and to present meaning via oral and written messages that focus on the themes of self, family, friends, and everyday activities in the present tense. Students also learn to address the same themes within an introduction to the past tense and begin to develop the ability to tell a story in the past. Students will be able to discuss and plan a vacation, talk about how they feel, talk about and describe clothing, express preferences in a store, negotiate and pay for items they buy, describe their daily routine and personal hygiene, and talk about and describe food and order food in a restaurant. Cultural aspects of the Arabic-speaking world are interwoven throughout the course. Web-based exercises, videos, and songs aid students in their acquisition of grammatical concepts, new vocabulary, and listening skills.

  •      AB3651

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Prerequisite(s): Journeys into Arabic II or by placement
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    AB3651 Navigating in Arabic I

  •      AB3652

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Prerequisite(s): Navigating into Arabic II or by placement
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week

    AB3652 Navigating in Arabic II

  •      AR4100

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Art
    Prerequisite(s): none
    Corequisite(s): none
    Graduation Requirements Met: One elective credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: Additional elective
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week and a lab

    AR4100 Drawing

    Drawing is the foundation of all art studio practices and is highly recommended as a prerequisite for all other art courses. A creative mind is increasingly sought out in every professional career track as art elements and design concepts are interdisciplinary. This course is taught to nurture creative and critical thinking, increase visual communication skills, and reacquaint the student with the "artist within." No experience is necessary! All students receive individual feedback from the instructor and further engage with classmates during studio time and the critiquing process. Through traditional drawing exercises with pencil, charcoal, and ink, students gain creative applications to better interpret reality and respond to their aesthetic values. In addition to in-class drawing assignments, all students are given a sketchbook to heighten their observation skills while building a visual vocabulary and further documenting their time at NCSSM. Repeatable for credit.

  •      AR4120

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Art
    Prerequisite(s): none
    Corequisite(s): none
    Graduation Requirements Met: One elective credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: Additional elective
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week and two labs

    AR4120 Ceramics

    This course introduces students to the materials, techniques, processes, and aesthetics involved in making functional ceramic art. Topics include clay bodies, potter's wheel basics, glazing, kiln loading and firing, and safety issues. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate hand-building and wheel throwing skills, glaze technique, and creative expression.

  •      AR4130

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Art
    Prerequisite(s): none
    Corequisite(s): none
    Graduation Requirements Met: One elective credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: Additional elective
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week and a lab

    AR4130 Sculpture and 3D Design

    This course introduces basic studio problems in three-dimensional visual design. Students will explore creative and technical methods of sculpture while considering structural elements and organizational principles as applied to mass and space. Upon completion, students should be able to apply three-dimensional design concepts in variety of sculptural approaches.

  •      AR4210

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Art
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One elective credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: Additional elective
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week

    AR4210 Open Studio

    Open Studio allows students to develop and transform their own inspirations and conceptions into an artistic reality with the ongoing support of the instructor. Although students generate their projects, they are challenged to link their concepts to a branch of philosophy, to study artists who have worked with similar concepts or materials, and to close the semester with a formal critique/presentation about their art and research. The purpose of this course is to gain feedback from the instructor and classmates through one-on-one critiques. Students develop a dialogue about art and learn to articulate their aesthetic values through giving and receiving constructive criticism. This course is perfect for students who have a creative idea and seek the time needed for artistic development. Students work with the instructor to find methods of visually communicating their concepts and have ample studio time to do so. Enrolled students have access to all studio equipment and art materials needed to bring their ideas to life. Repeatable for credit.

  •      AR4310

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Art
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): none
    Corequisite(s): none
    Graduation Requirements Met: One elective credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: Additional elective
    Meeting Times: Two periods per week

    AR4310 Digital Photography

    This course introduces students to the concepts and techniques necessary to create, edit, and print color photographic images using digital technology. Units on composition, color theory, image-editing, printing options, and digital image storage are also covered. Students focus on personal exploration using technology as a creative medium for visual expression. Students are expected to respect photography equipment, the art studio, and develop a healthy studio practice. Repeatable for credit.

  •      AR4520

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Art
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Recommendation of the art instructor and permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One elective credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: Additional elective
    Meeting Times: One period per week AND two 100-min evening periods

    AR4520 Advanced Studio Art

    This largely self-paced advanced art course allows students the opportunity to further develop skills and techniques acquired in AR4320. Students are encouraged to take creative risks while building their art portfolios and expanding on their definitions of drawing. Emphasis is placed on creating more complex visual statements, increasing comprehension of conceptual content, and developing further technical competence. Students will create an independent body of work and demonstrate their ability to speak critically and professionally about their art. In addition to studio time, this course includes a sketchbook assignment, a written artist statement, and at least one formal critique. This course may be repeated for credit.

  •      AS4051

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: Two American Studies credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    AS4051 American Studies I

    American Studies is the core humanities experience for all NCSSM juniors. In this course, the first in a required two-course sequence, students take an interdisciplinary, cultural-studies approach to the critical study of American history and literature—from Indigenous American nations before contact with Europeans to the period of Reconstruction. Students examine the continuing development of both collective and individual American identities through the study of history and historiography, literature and literary theory, politics, economics, law, material culture, the visual arts, film, music, and other aspects of American culture. A key feature of the curriculum is instruction and practice in close and critical reading, critical thinking, and academic writing—skills foundational to NCSSM's senior humanities courses and to future higher-level work across disciplines. Discussions, group and individual projects, and a variety of writing assignments invite students to recover, construct, interrogate, and interpret the past as narratives woven from many threads. Through collaborative inquiry and investigation, students encounter the past as a means of interrogating issues in our current world and as a path to becoming informed, empathetic, engaged, and ethical citizens in their local and global communities.

  •      AS4052

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: Two American Studies credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    AS4052 American Studies II

    American Studies is the core humanities experience for all NCSSM juniors. In this course, the second in a required two-course sequence, students take an interdisciplinary, cultural-studies approach to the critical study of American history and literature—from the period of Reconstruction to the present day. Students examine the continuing development of both collective and individual American identities through the study of history and historiography, literature and literary theory, politics, economics, law, material culture, the visual arts, film, music, and other aspects of American culture. A key feature of the curriculum is instruction and practice in close and critical reading, critical thinking, and academic writing—skills foundational to NCSSM's senior humanities courses and to future higher-level work across disciplines. Discussions, group and individual projects, and a variety of writing assignments invite students to recover, construct, interrogate, and interpret the past as narratives woven from many threads. Through collaborative inquiry and investigation, students encounter the past as a means of interrogating issues in our current world and as a path to becoming informed, empathetic, engaged, and ethical citizens in their local and global communities.

  •      BI3580

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Biology
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit OR One Biology credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    BI3580 Classical Genetics (*M*)

    This course begins with the fundamentals of cell division (mitosis and meiosis) and focuses on modes of inheritance of traits, beginning with Mendel's pea plants and stressing extensions and exceptions to Mendel's principles. Laboratory activities with fruit flies, problem-solving, and critical thinking skills are emphasized. Students enrolling in this course should have strong mathematical and problem-solving skills.

  •      BI3900

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Biology
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    BI3900 Reseach Experience in Biology

    This introductory course is for students who want to pursue a research opportunity in biology. Students will learn to design and conduct an experiment, analyze data, and present their findings. In addition, students read and discuss scientific literature. Students will work in small groups on a research project. Research questions may be selected from an area identified by the instructor (examples: microbiology, food science, neurobiology, entomology etc.), or from topics proposed by the student as appropriate. Students will write a final paper describing their research and make a formal oral and visual presentation of their findings. This course includes a significant research component.

  •      BI4010

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Biology
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Biology credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    BI4010 Anatomy & Physiology

    This course provides an in-depth study of the structure and function of the human body. The structure of the body systems, including integumentary, skeletal, muscular, cardiovascular, respiratory, endocrine, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems is put into context of how the body grows, maintains homeostasis, and responds in the disease-state. The laboratory component includes microscopic analysis and dissection of relevant animal models, as well as physiological concepts via experimentation.

  •      BI4020

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Biology
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Biology credit OR One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    BI4020 Ecology (*R*)

    In this course students study ecology at the level of the organism, population, community, and ecosystem. Special emphasis is given to quantifying population growth and interspecific interactions, including predator-prey, and competitive relationships. Labs are designed to expose students to working with live organisms, seeing ecological patterns in the field, and quantifying ecological variables. This course includes a significant research component.

  •      BI4030

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Biology
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Biology credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    BI4030 Environmental Science (*R*)

    This course focuses on the study of natural Earth processes in order to understand how these processes have grown interdependent over millennia to form a life-supporting and balanced Earth system. Due to the interdisciplinary nature of this course, the laboratory and field components include a variety of activities from analysis of existing data sets to experimental design. Many of the field trips and labs are off campus and outdoors. Topics will include: ecosystem processes, population ecology, climate change, and environmental risks and exposures. Students will be introduced to relevant analytical methods in spatial analysis and toxicology. This course could be used to self-study for the AP environmental science exam but is not an official AP course. This course includes a significant research component.

  •      BI4130

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Biology
    Prerequisite(s): BI4020 Ecology OR BI4211 AP Biology II OR BI4030 Environmental Science OR AP Biology OR AP Environmental Science
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Biology credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    BI4130 Aquatic Ecology

    Aquatic ecology is the study of abiotic and biotic factors that influence the structure and dynamics of aquatic ecosystems. It includes the chemical, physical, and biological characteristics of streams, lakes, estuaries, and intertidal zones. Special emphasis is placed on interactions between abiotic and biotic factors, energy flow in food webs, and the role of humans in altering aquatic ecosystems. Students learn about ongoing research in aquatic ecology and gain experience making field observations, designing experiments, and analyzing data to test hypotheses. Regular outdoor experiences, both on and off campus, expose students to a variety of aquatic ecosystems. This course includes a significant research component.

  •      BI4140

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Biology
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Biology credit OR One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    BI4140 Molecular & Cellular Biol

    The first portion of this course examines biochemical principles and the structure and properties of lipids, proteins, and carbohydrates. Students then examine cellular structure and function common to most eukaryotic organisms. Students examine biological levels of organization (molecules, organelles, cells, tissues, organs, and organ systems) by exploring human diseases and drug therapies. Topics in the course include cellular components, membrane function, energetics, enzyme function, cellular aging, cellular communication, biological levels of organization, diseases, and the drug approval process. Laboratory activities are designed to develop critical thinking skills and thoughtful data interpretation.

  •      BI4160

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Biology
    Prerequisite(s): Completion, with a course grade of B- or higher in at least one course from either the Human Body or Cellular Biology course strands
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Biology credit OR One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    BI4160 Neuroscience (*R*)

    The goal of this course is to provide an introduction to the biological basis of behavior at cellular, systems, and organismal levels. This course enables students to understand the physiological and anatomical mechanisms underlying complex behaviors such as sensory input, motor control, animals as model organisms for human behavior, auditory and visual perception, higher order processing, and memory. The course will provide an entry into how scientists attempt to understand the complexity of our human experience as sentient biological entities. This course emphasizes group work through a significant amount of independent project work. This course includes a significant research component.

  •      BI4210

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Biology
    Prerequisite(s): Any prior HS Chemistry
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit OR One Biology credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    BI4210 AP Biology (I) (*R*)

    This course is the first semester of a two-term sequence that surveys most areas of biology and prepares students for the Advanced Placement Biology exam. AP Biology I focuses on cellular biology, including biomolecules, cellular energetics, signaling, and molecular genetics. The course has a strong laboratory emphasis, with a significant research component. Students who are planning to take the AP exam should also enroll in AP Biology II.

  •      BI4211

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Biology
    Prerequisite(s): BI4210 AP Biology (I) or permission of the Dean of Science.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Biology credit OR One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    BI4211 AP Biology (II) (*R*)

    This course is the second semester of a two-term sequence that surveys most areas of biology and prepares students for the Advanced Placement Biology exam. AP Biology II covers organisms, populations, and ecosystems, with a focus on evolutionary processes. The course has a strong laboratory emphasis, with a significant research component.

  •      BI4920

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Biology
    Prerequisite(s): By application in the Fall of the Junior year.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Biology credit OR January Term
    Schedule Requirements Met: January Term
    Meeting Times: Two week intensive January Term

    BI4920 Research in Biology I (*R*)

    This is an advanced course for January Term junior students with the maturity, independence, and motivation necessary to conduct their own research project. Students learn the scientific method and experimental design before conducting a trial experiment on a small scale. Students then write a mini- literature review on the topic of interest to them. Throughout the term students read from the primary scientific literature and participate in discussion groups on current issues in biological research. 

    Students who are accepted and enrolled in Research in Biology are expected to complete the entire sequence of courses including participation in 3 weeks of summer research on campus.  This entire sequence includes 2 weeks of Jan Term in your junior year, Spring semester of your junior year, summer (3 weeks of SRIP) between the junior and senior year and Fall semester of your senior year. 

    Students must have a grade of B or higher to continue the sequence and have no major conduct violations to participate in SRIP.

    Fall 
    Jan Term 
    Spring 
    Summer 
    Jr Year 
    JTerm I
    Spring 
    SRIP
    Sr Year
    Fall

  •      BI4921

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Biology
    Prerequisite(s): Students with Junior standing apply in the Fall for entry in RBio I taught during the 1st two weeks of Jan Term.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit OR One Biology credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Seven periods per week and three labs

    BI4921 Research in Biology II (*R*)

    This is an advanced course for second semester junior students. Students write a detailed research proposal and defend it to a panel of their peers. Students begin to learn techniques and to gather data for their experiments. Based on the outcomes of the term's work, students may be given an opportunity to participate in summer research programs on campus. 

    Students who are accepted and enrolled in Research in Biology are expected to complete the entire sequence of courses including participation in 3 weeks of summer research on campus.  This entire sequence includes 2 weeks of Jan Term in your junior year, Spring semester of your junior year, summer (3 weeks of SRIP) between the junior and senior year and Fall semester of your senior year. 

    Students must have a grade of B or higher to continue the sequence and have no major conduct violations to participate in SRIP.

    Fall 
    Jan Term 
    Spring 
    Summer 
    Jr Year 
    JTerm I
    Spring 
    SRIP
    Sr Year
    Fall

  •      BI4922

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Biology
    Prerequisite(s): Final grade of B or higher in Research in Biology II, or successful participation in a summer research program and permission of the Dean of Science.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Seven periods per week and three labs

    BI4922 Research in Biology III (*R*)

    Students continue work on their previous research to produce additional data and conduct statistical analysis, as needed. They may research extension questions based on their original work. Students write a formal research paper and prepare a formal presentation. Students are required to present their results at the NCSSM Research Symposium in the spring and are encouraged to present their research at the North Carolina Student Academy of Science competition and other competitions. This course includes a significant research component

  •      CH3500

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Chemistry
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit OR One Chemistry credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    CH3500 Chemistry Core - Atoms & Molecules

    This course provides a thorough introduction to chemical principles using a college-level textbook. It is a rigorous course that covers the fundamental concepts (atomic structure, molecular structure, chemical bonding, chemical reactions, and an introduction to thermodynamics.) Students who wish to enroll in CH4120 (AP Chemistry: Energy and Transformations) require a grade of B+ or better in CH3500 (or permission of the Dean of Science) and must complete the January-term prerequisite .

  •      CH3900

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Chemistry
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods and a lab OR Three periods and two labs

    CH3900 Research Experience in Chemistry (*R*)

    This introductory course is for students who want to pursue a research opportunity in chemistry. No previous chemistry coursework is required. Students will reflect on their prior observations and learn how to read the primary scientific literature; learn how to select a research question and propose a hypothesis; learn experimental design and finally they will conduct experiments and analyze and present their data. Throughout the entire term, students learn scientific writing in the form of literature review, grant proposal, progress report, and research paper. Students also exercise aspects of scientific communication through individual study, group discussion, and lecture presentation. Students are encouraged to present their work at the NCSSM Research Symposium and/or other state and national competitions.

  •      CH4000

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Chemistry
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of CH3500 or by placement or permission of the Dean of Science.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit OR One Chemistry credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    CH4000 Chemistry Core - Reactions & Energy

    This course is designed for students who already have proficiency in the concepts of chemistry that are introduced in CH3500. Additional topics covered in this course include chemical kinetics, equilibrium, acids and bases and electrochemistry. Students are exposed to instrumentation and computation as part of their lab skills development. Activities and labs are designed to provide opportunities for students to develop problem-solving and laboratory skills as they learn to design and conduct chemistry experiments, as well as to become independent learners. This course includes topics that satisfy the chemistry graduation requirement.

  •      CH4020

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Chemistry
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Chemistry credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    CH4020 AP Chemistry (I): Atoms & Molecules (*M*)

    This course provides a thorough introduction to chemical principles using a college-level textbook. It is a rigorous course that covers the fundamental concepts (atomic structure, molecular structure, chemical bonding, chemical reactions, and an introduction to thermodynamics.) It covers additional topics not contained in CH3500 and treats many areas in greater depth. Students should have strong math and abstract reasoning skills. This course provides the the foundation of the AP Chemistry curriculum but it is not complete; students interested in taking the AP Chemistry examination should also enroll in CH4120.

  •      CH4120

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Chemistry
    Prerequisite(s): CH4020, or a modified CH exemption
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Chemistry credit OR One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    CH4120 AP Chemistry (II): Kinetics & Energy

    This course is for students who completed a previous chemistry course that covered molecular structure and reactions and who qualify for a modified exemption. This course covers topics in chemical kinetics, equilibrium, acids and bases and electrochemistry. Emphasis is on completion of the AP chemistry curriculum along with further development of laboratory and problem solving skills. This course includes topics that satisfy the chemistry graduation requirement.

  •      CH4130

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Chemistry
    Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of Chem Core I, or Chem Core II, or AP Chem I, or permission of the Dean of Science.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit OR One Chemistry credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    CH4130 Organic Chemistry

    This course introduces students to the structure, synthesis, and reactions of the major functional groups present in organic compounds. Reaction mechanisms, stereochemistry, and the prediction of products are covered. The laboratory involves synthetic and separation techniques and the use of physical and instrumental methods of verifying the products of reactions. Most of the experiments are performed at a micro scale level. This course includes topics that satisfy the chemistry graduation requirement.

  •      CH4140

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Chemistry
    Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of Chem Core I, or Chem Core II, or AP Chem I, or permission of the Dean of Science.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Chemistry credit OR One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    CH4140 Environmental Chem (*R*)

    This course focuses on the chemistry associated with topics of environmental concern such as acid rain, photochemical smog, global warming, and water and land pollution. Principles of sustainable development are addressed within each of these topics, and solutions that may contribute to a sustainable future are discussed. Laboratory activities include field and sampling trips that focus on the fate of chemicals in the environment. A service-learning component enables students to apply their knowledge and understanding to the solution of a local or regional environmental problem. This course includes topics that satisfy the chemistry graduation requirement.

  •      CH4920

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Chemistry

    CH4920 Research Chem I (*R*)

  •      CN3051

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week

    CN3051 Journeys into Chinese I

    Journeys into Chinese I is designed for those non-heritage Mandarin speakers who have never spoken or studied the language. This course provides students with the fundamentals for learning to understand, speak, and begin to read and write Mandarin Chinese. The course focuses on developing accurate pronunciation and tones, learning to understand the spoken language in context, and developing a foundation of basic sentence patterns, questions, and everyday vocabulary. The sound system (Pinyin and tones) and the writing system (radicals and stroke order) are presented in detail. Reading is used to support and reinforce the acquisition of the spoken language. The course is proficiency-based and its focus is on the development of listening and speaking skills.

  •      CN3052

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Prerequisite(s): CN3051 or permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week

    CN3052 Journeys into Chinese II

    Journeys into Chinese II is designed for those who have learned Pinyin and basic characters and can understand and answer simple questions. This course provides students with the fundamentals for learning to understand, speak, read, and write Mandarin Chinese. The course focuses on learning to understand the spoken language in context and developing a foundation of basic sentence patterns, questions, and everyday vocabulary. Reading is used to support and reinforce the acquisition of the spoken language. The course is proficiency-based and its focus is on the development of listening and speaking skills. The class is conducted mainly in Chinese.

  •      CN3651

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Prerequisite(s): CN3052 or permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week

    CN3651 Navigating in Chinese + Global Understanding I

    Navigating in Chinese + Global Understanding is designed for students who are able to carry on basic conversations in Mandarin about everyday topics. The focus continues to be on the development of listening and speaking skills, with the specific goals of expanding vocabulary and exposing students to more sentence patterns. There is an additional focus on character/word analysis and reading strategies, composition skills, and cultural understanding. The course is proficiency-based, and class is conducted entirely in Chinese. A special feature of the course is a weekly shared virtual classroom with a high school in China. Students thus have the opportunity to engage in educational and cultural exchange with their counterparts in China, and to communicate in Chinese in real-life interactions with native speakers.

  •      CN3652

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Prerequisite(s): CN3651 or permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week

    CN3652 Navigating in Chinese + Global Understanding II

    Navigating in Chinese + Global Understanding is designed for students who are able to carry on basic conversations in Mandarin about everyday topics. The focus continues to be on the development of listening and speaking skills, with the specific goals of expanding vocabulary and exposing students to more sentence patterns. There is an additional focus on character/word analysis and reading strategies, composition skills, and cultural understanding. The course is proficiency-based, and class is conducted entirely in Chinese. A special feature of the course is a weekly shared virtual classroom with a high school in China. Students thus have the opportunity to engage in educational and cultural exchange with their counterparts in China, and to communicate in Chinese in real-life interactions with native speakers.

  •      CN4250

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Dean of Humanities based upon demonstrated Chinese-language proficiency acquired outside of typical Chinese courses (e.g., the student grew up in a Chinese-speaking home).
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week

    CN4250 Explorations in Chinese for Heritage Speakers

    Explorations in Chinese for Heritage Speakers is designed for students who grew up hearing or speaking Mandarin and are able to comfortably carry on extended conversations in Mandarin, but have limited literacy skills. The primary focus of the course is on developing students' reading and writing abilities, while continuing to expand their listening and speaking skills. Starting from Pinyin, stroke orders, basic radicals and characters, the course will gradually expand students' character-recognition abilities. Students will learn characters and phrases through reading stories and novels that provide cultural topics. The course is conducted entirely in Chinese.

  •      CN4652

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Prerequisite(s): CN4052 or CN4060, or permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week

    CN4652 Readings in Chinese with Topics

    Readings in Chinese with Topics is designed for students who are able to comfortably carry on extended conversations in Mandarin beyond everyday topics and to comprehend texts in high frequency vocabulary with ease. The course focuses on developing students’ reading and writing abilities while continuing to strengthen their listening and speaking skills. Expanding vocabulary and sentence patterns are also key goals in this course. By building these skills, students further develop their ability to discuss various topics in a more sophisticated way. Students will also expand their cultural knowledge and language skills through reading and writing. The course is proficiency-based and conducted entirely in Chinese.

  •      CS4120

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Engineering & Computer Science
    Subject: Computer Science
    Prerequisite(s): none
    Corequisite(s): none
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit OR One Computer Science / Engineering credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    CS4120 Computing for Everyone

    This course is an introduction to basic programming skills and to the Python 3 programming language. Python is one of the most popular programming languages and is the language of choice for data science, machine learning and humanities research. Topics covered will include variables, expressions and statements, functions, conditionals, loops, recursion, string manipulation, input/output statements, lists, and dictionaries. Students will learn to develop and code solutions to problems consistent with challenges found in mathematics, science, engineering and the humanities.

  •      CS4230

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Engineering & Computer Science
    Subject: Computer Science
    Prerequisite(s): CS4120: Computing for Everyone or Permission of the CS Chair
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Computer Science / Engineering credit OR One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week and a lab

    CS4230 Networks and the Web

    This course introduces students to how computer networks operate, and how we can use them in the development of software. Students will use client-side technologies such as HTML, CSS, and JavaScript to create interactive web applications. We will then extend that knowledge to the server-side to allow communication over a network between multiple people. Topics include: Box Model, UX Design, Web Sockets, and NodeJS.

  •      CS4250

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Engineering & Computer Science
    Subject: Computer Science
    Prerequisite(s): Computing for Everyone or PYTHON placement test
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Computer Science / Engineering credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    CS4250 Data Visualization

    Data visualization is an important subdomain of Data Science where you translate data into a visual context, such as a map or graph, to make the data easier for the human brain to determine important characteristics and patterns. This course will provide you with the knowledge and practical skills necessary to develop a strong foundation for data visualization, and to design and develop advanced applications for visual data analysis. In particular, you will learn how to perform data visualization and analysis using data visualization libraries written for the Python programming language including Matplotlib, Seaborn and Pandas.

  •      CS4270

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Engineering & Computer Science
    Subject: Computer Science
    Prerequisite(s): CS4020: Web Development; CS4040:Game Design and Simulation; CS4120:Computing for Everyone: CS/MA4200:Cryptography or Placement Exam
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Computer Science / Engineering credit OR One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week and a lab

    CS4270 Fundamentals of Object-Oriented Design

    This is a second course in computer science which achieves two major goals: one is building skill in writing coherent programs that implement algorithms; the second is using classes and objects to assist in separating concerns through encapsulation and modularization. It is a course meant to turn good programmers into good computer scientists. We will discuss the various ways data can be stored and how the flow of programs can be manipulated. Finally, we will study the object model including problem decomposition, polymorphism, and inheritance. While this course does not exhaustively cover all concepts on the AP Computer Science A exam, it can be used to assist with preparation for the exam.

  •      CS4300

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Engineering & Computer Science
    Subject: Computer Science
    Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Computer Science Chair
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Computer Science / Engineering credit OR One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    CS4300 Topics in Computer Science: Robotics Design for Competition

    Robotic Design is a project-based course focusing on robotic applications for national robotic competitions that are supported by NCSSM-Morganton. Students will learn soft skills including project management, team management, professional documentation, and presentation skills. Students will also develop more robust technical skills in fabrication, sensor data implementation, computer vision, path-planning, kinematics, machine learning, ROS framework, and much more. Students with no previous robotics experience should first take EE4100: Introductory Robotics.

  •      CS4320

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Engineering & Computer Science
    Subject: Computer Science
    Prerequisite(s): CS4240 Procedural and Object-Oriented Programming or CS4260 Java with Topics or placement test.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Computer Science / Engineering credit OR One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    CS4320 Machine Learning

    This course teaches basic machine learning concepts, algorithms and their applications using Python and associated software libraries. Machine learning concepts include where ML fits within AI, Data Science, and Statistics, where ML is being commonly used, and the larger societal context including possible ethical concerns. Machine learning techniques include supervised learning, unsupervised learning, and reinforcement learning. Applications may include implementation of decision trees, neural networks, and other frameworks. This course features a final project allowing students to apply machine learning techniques to a problem of interest to them. This course requires advanced programming skill and expects mastery of the Python programming language as evidenced by meeting the course prerequisite or by placement exam.

  •      CS4330

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Engineering & Computer Science
    Subject: Computer Science
    Prerequisite(s): CS4230 or CS4270
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit OR One Computer Science / Engineering credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week and a lab

    CS4330 Server-Side Development

    This project-based course merges HTML/CSS, JavaScript, and Python to create dynamic web applications and distributed networks. Students will use database technologies such as SQL or MongoDB to customize web sites for individual users. Security implications will be addressed as students learn how to program and deploy their own web server. Topics include: threads, databases, network APIs, and hashing.

  •      CS4350

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Engineering & Computer Science
    Subject: Computer Science
    Prerequisite(s): Networks and the Web or Fundamentals of Object-Oriented Design
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Computer Science / Engineering credit OR One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week and a lab

    CS4350 Data Structures and Algorithms

    Data Structures and Algorithms is a project-based course covering material generally found in a second semester undergraduate computer science major course. Students will explore foundational data structure and their application to computing concepts. Students will also learn how to analyze data structures and algorithms for efficiency to determine which data structure is most appropriate for a given scenario. Specific data structures covered include: linked lists, binary trees, heaps, hashmaps and graphs.

  •      CS4920

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Engineering & Computer Science
    Subject: Computer Science
    Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Dean of Engineering and Computer Science.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit OR One Computer Science / Engineering credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    CS4920 Advanced Computer Science Topics

    This course offers an opportunity for students with an especially strong background in computer science to pursue a rigorous study of a topic outside the standard curriculum. This course is intended for students who have exhausted the other course offerings in computer science or who wish to do independent research in computer science.

  •      DR4101

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Drama
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One elective credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: Additional elective
    Meeting Times: One 100-min. evening period per week

    DR4101 Theater Performance Workshop

    This course focuses on the craft of stage performance beginning with rudiments of stageworthy presence and building outwards to develop the skills and vocabulary of the theater artist. Our focus is on creating character and story using various approaches to movement on stage including Viewpoints, Roy Hart, and Stanislavski. Students will work as individuals and as cooperative ensembles in text analysis and scene study with both devised and existing texts. During each class, students participate in acting exercises that include structured peer feedback and often require physical activity. The semester will culminate in a brief performance by the full ensemble that may include found, devised, and/or existing script text. In addition, enrolled students apply their classroom experience by engaging as artist or audience with the coinciding mainstage theatrical production. No previous experience is required. Repeatable for credit.

  •      DR4102

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Drama
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One elective credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: Additional elective
    Meeting Times: One 100-min. evening period per week

    DR4102 Theater Performance Workshop

    This course focuses on the craft of stage performance beginning with rudiments of vocal presence and building outwards to develop the skills and vocabulary of the theater artist. Our focus is on creating character and story using various approaches to voice on stage including Linklater, Roy Hart, and Rodenberg. Students will work as individuals and as cooperative ensembles in text analysis and scene study with both devised and existing texts. During each class, students participate in acting exercises that include structured peer feedback and often require physical activity. The semester will culminate in a brief performance by the full ensemble that may include found, devised, and/or existing script text. In addition, enrolled students apply their classroom experience by engaging as artist or audience with the coinciding mainstage theatrical production. No previous experience is required. Repeatable for credit.

  •      EE3100

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Engineering & Computer Science
    Subject: Engineering
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit OR One Computer Science / Engineering credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    EE3100 CAD/CAM

    This course provides in-depth instruction in computer graphics. The goal of this course is to learn how to use computer-aided design (CAD) software to graphically represent two-dimensional and three-dimensional objects. This course emphasizes product design, assembly drawing, and exploded views. This course is well-suited to students considering a career in engineering or research, and for those students who wish to become more effective in visually communicating technical information in any profession. The final project is an original design of a functional object complete with all drawings necessary for its construction.

  •      EE4000

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Engineering & Computer Science
    Subject: Engineering
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Computer Science / Engineering credit OR One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    EE4000 Mechanical Engineering

    This course introduces students to the study and practice of mechanical engineering. Using activities, design projects, and laboratory modules students learn how engineers use mathematics and science to design efficient and beneficial devices such as automobiles, power plants, airplanes, machinery, and heating/cooling equipment. Topics include engineering design, simple machines, mechanisms, materials, dynamics, heat transfer, thermodynamics, fluid dynamics, and modeling.

  •      EE4020

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Engineering & Computer Science
    Subject: Engineering
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit OR One Computer Science / Engineering credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    EE4020 Electrical Engineering

    This course introduces students to topics important to the fields of electrical, electronic, and computer engineering. Using activities, laboratory modules, and a major design project students learn first-hand how electrical engineers analyze and solve problems. Topics include basic DC and AC circuits, OpAmps, semiconductors, and logic design.

  •      EE4080

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Engineering & Computer Science
    Subject: Engineering
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Computer Science / Engineering credit OR One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    EE4080 Biomedical Engineering

    This course introduces students to the different sub-specialties of biomedical engineering including biomaterials, biomechanics, bioelectricity, biomedical devices, and measurements, as well as design. Through hands-on labs, activities, and collaborative design projects students kinesthetically explore and experience biomedical engineering principles, the engineering design process, and problem solving and troubleshooting.

  •      EE4100

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Engineering & Computer Science
    Subject: Engineering
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit OR One Computer Science / Engineering credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab,Three periods per week and two labs

    EE4100 Introductory Robotics

    This project-based course introduces students to the fundamentals of robotics including the building and programming of autonomous robots using basic sensors and programming tools. Students also gain teamwork and design experience. Topics include basic sense and response programming, compound gear trains, kinematics, and rotary-linear motion assemblies. A significant portion of the course is dedicated to the iteration process of adding functionality to a base robot.

  •      EE4160

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Engineering & Computer Science
    Subject: Engineering
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Computer Science / Engineering credit OR One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    EE4160 Civil Engineering

    This course introduces students to the study and practice of civil engineering and to math and science concepts needed to solve problems related to this and other engineering disciplines. Topics include the engineering design process, engineering mathematics, applied and reactive forces and moments, static equilibrium, distributed loadings, strength of materials, and stress and buckling analyses for structures in tension, compression, and bending. Activities include small-scale laboratory explorations, design projects inspired by the profession, data acquisition and computational modeling.

  •      EE4180

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Engineering & Computer Science
    Subject: Engineering
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit OR One Computer Science / Engineering credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    EE4180 Environmental Engineering

    This course introduces students to the study and practice of environmental engineering and to math and science concepts needed to solve problems related to these and other engineering disciplines. Topics include engineering design, hydrology and water resources, stormwater modeling and management, drinking and wastewater treatment, pollutant fate and transport, health effects of environmental pollutants, and mitigation and remediation strategies. Activities include small-scale laboratory explorations, design projects inspired by the profession, field measurement, online data acquisition and computational modeling.

  •      EE4200

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Engineering & Computer Science
    Subject: Engineering
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit OR One Computer Science / Engineering credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    EE4200 Digital Agriculture and Engineering

    This course introduces students to the application of digital technologies to agricultural production. These tools enable farmers to boost yields and income globally while reducing the environmental impact of agriculture. Topics of study include crop plant physiology, controlled environment agriculture, precision agriculture, Internet of Things, automation, and artificial intelligence. For projects, students will design and prototype scientifc instruments, smart devices, and growing environments to optimize crop production.

  •      EE4300

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Engineering & Computer Science
    Subject: Engineering
    Prerequisite(s): January Term Robotics Course
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Computer Science / Engineering credit OR One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    EE4300 Topics In Engineering - Robotics Design

    This course will present engineering topics that are not part of the regular offerings of the department of engineering and computer science and can focus on a variety of topics, with special emphasis to those involving engineering design. Robotics Design is for students who want to pursue a more formal design experience as part of NCSSM's FIRST Robotics Team, the Zebracorns. It is for students with the motivation, independence, and maturity necessary to conduct their own design projects in robotics, either related to software and control or mechanical design. Students can use industry-leading robotics software, the Robotics Operating System, to integrate sensor and machine learning systems required for robot control, build machine learning models, interfaces, or they can learn CAD (OnShape) to design a variety of mechanisms using motors, actuators, and pneumatics. Both the software and mechanical designs will undergo design reviews and can be tested under real world conditions, requiring sustained reliable operation, during the FIRST Robotics competition season. Final projects can include white papers and engineering design portfolios. Students will be accepted to this course by application.

  •      EN4300

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of AS4051/AS4052 American Studies I/II and OR completion of AS4051 and approval of the Dean of Humanities during Spring Administrative Adjustment. Juniors may not request this course until Spring Administrative Adjustment.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One English credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week and a lab

    EN4300 Creative Writing

    This is a course for students who get excited about language, who feel compelled to copy down poems and song lyrics in the pages of their journal, who find language the most natural form of expression. In this introduction to the composition and reading of creative writing, students will build a solid foundation for the craft of writing in multiple genres. To learn about the current field, students discuss a wide range of contemporary creative writing by “reading like a writer”—gleaning writing lessons from mentor texts and practicing those lessons in their own work. In addition to reading creative works, students ponder theoretical and historical questions of creative writing: How does cultural bias impact what readers consider ‘good writing’? How do genre conventions evolve, and what does it mean to work outside traditional genres? Students work individually on assignments, discuss readings as a class, and collaborate with peers in workshops where burgeoning writers encounter an affirming and constructive audience for their work. Assignments focus on developing the tools for writing in many genres and styles, along with developing the habits to enable the generation of ideas, the ability to trust intuition, the construction of narrative and image, and the process of revision. To give back to the writer’s community, students may also write book reviews or conduct interviews with authors. A final project, either a portfolio or longer work, is accompanied by a critical reflection that asks students to identify their influences and aesthetics. By the end of this course, students will have both a polished portfolio of their best work and the skills to engage deeply in a creative process that results in powerful writing.

  •      EN4425

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of AS4051/AS4052 American Studies I/II and OR completion of AS4051 and approval of the Dean of Humanities during Spring Administrative Adjustment. Juniors may not request this course until Spring Administrative Adjustment.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One English credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week OR two 100-min. evening periods

    EN4425 Greek Drama and Performance

    EN4425 Greek Drama and Performance
    From “[W]hat do I want with golden, woven fancies? Black is my wear!” in Medea to “I, Oedipus, whom all men call the great” in Oedipus Rex, so much of our modern stage and screen remains rooted in the development of drama in Greece’s Golden Age. This course, Greek Drama and Performance, will undertake two primary aims: 1) an academic aim to immerse ourselves in a chronological study of Greek dramas from Aeschylus to Aristophanes to see the rapid development of theater in Greece’s Golden Age and in so doing better understand Greek culture from the time and 2) a performance aimed to showcase these ancient, yet extremely relevant, texts through multiple public performances. This course entails careful attention to close reading, critical thinking, and writing as well as performance considerations such as costuming, ideating props, and script production. Students will demonstrate their learning through written assignments, a final exam, and their participation in two Greek tragedies and a Greek comedy in public performance.
     

  •      EN4430

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of AS4051/AS4052 American Studies I/II and OR completion of AS4051 and approval of the Dean of Humanities during Spring Administrative Adjustment. Juniors may not request this course until Spring Administrative Adjustment.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One English credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week and a lab

    EN4430 Modern World Fiction

    Beginning with experimental novels of the late nineteenth-century and focusing on French, Spanish, German, Czech, English, American, Cuban, Colombian, African, and Japanese writers, this comparative literature course examines the extraordinary flowering of twentieth-century fiction—with its open-ended form and experimental styles—against a backdrop of what Stephen Kern has called a transformed “culture of time and space.” In our effort to understand this rich body of literature, we explore the relationships between movements in philosophy and the visual arts—including photography and film—and the changing shapes of fiction. Readings may include short stories by Jorge Luis Borges and Michel Tournier; novels such as Conrad's Heart of Darkness, Bram Stoker's Dracula, Osamu Dazai's No Longer Human, Milan Kundera's The Unbearable Lightness of Being, Faulkner's The Sound and the Fury, Alejo Carpentier's The Kingdom of This World, Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway, Miguel de Unamuno's San Manuel Bueno, Mártir, Kafka's Metamorphosis, Gide's The Immoralist, Gabriel García Márquez's One Hundred Years of Solitude, and Donna Tartt's Secret History. Through a series of analytical essays, students explore questions about authors and their audiences and the relationship between literary texts and contexts. In the process, students strengthen their own voices and explore the connections between literary and cultural identity.

  •      EN4440

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Prerequisite(s): American Studies 1 & 2
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One English credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week and a lab

    EN4440 AI in Science Fiction

    Science fiction doesn’t predict the future, but it can help shape it. Good science fiction, in the words of Philip K. Dick, takes a new idea and makes it “intellectually stimulating to the reader. . . . It unlocks the reader’s mind so that that mind, like the author’s, begins to create. Thus science fiction is creative and it inspires creativity.” In this course, we will follow a series of writers and filmmakers as they attempt to unlock our minds and open them to the potentialities and problems of artificial general intelligence. As scientists around the world work to enhance machine learning capabilities and as figures ranging from Elon Musk to Henry Kissinger warn of the dangers of AI, this course will look to science fiction as a laboratory of ideas, one in which creative minds ask us to consider a number of different ways that AI is and could transform our society. Students will thus be asked, and generate their own answers to, a variety of questions that will accompany the development of general intelligence. Such questions include: How will researchers know when they have actually created a general intelligence? Will it be sentient? If so, what rules and laws should govern our treatment of AI, or AI’s treatment of humanity? What’s the difference between a human and algorithm trained to perfectly mimic that human’s speech patterns? Can AI make art? And do androids dream of electric sheep? In this class, we will explore the answers our most imaginative artists have come up with to those questions.

  •      EN4481

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of AS4051/AS4052 American Studies I/II and OR completion of AS4051 and approval of the Dean of Humanities during Spring Administrative Adjustment. Juniors may not request this course until Spring Administrative Adjustment.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One English credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods and a lab OR two 100-min. evening periods

    EN4481 Topics in Literature I

    EN4481 Topics in Literature I: Women Writers, East and West
    In A Room of One’s Own, after realizing that there is nothing known about women or women writers before the eighteenth century, Virginia Woolf writes, “[L]et me imagine, since the facts are so hard to come by, what would have happened had Shakespeare had a wonderfully gifted sister, called Judith, let us say.” In this course, we will continue Woolf’s efforts to understand the struggles of women’s literature and women in literature, both in the past and present. The course covers literatures of women globally, with a broad focus on various genres and periods, and provides literary, historical, and sociological contexts for women’s writing. Throughout the semester, we will engage with literature from diverse cultural backgrounds to explore the interdiscursivity of womanhood and identify connections between movements for women’s rights. Our conversations will include themes such as the origins of women’s writing, literary traditions, the history of subordination, the clash of cultural identities and womanhood, the dynamics of gendered oppression, transgenerational relations of women, trauma narratives and narrative strategies, and social class issues. We will read both theoretical and creative works by Sappho, Lady Murasaki, Virginia Woolf, Anna Julia Cooper, Zabel Yessayan, Simone de Beauvoir, Toni Morrison, Fatima Mernissi, Urmila Pawar, and many others. Students will demonstrate what they learn through interpretive writing assignments and creative group projects. The course will also include presentations and online discussion forums.

  •      EN4482

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of AS4051/AS4052 American Studies I/II and OR completion of AS4051 and approval of the Dean of Humanities during Spring Administrative Adjustment. Juniors may not request this course until Spring Administrative Adjustment.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One English credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week

    EN4482 Topics in Literature II

    “Grown-ups never understand anything by themselves, and it is tiresome for children to be always and forever explaining things to them” (Saint-Exupéry). Building on this quotation from The Little Prince, which invites us into a child’s perception of adulthood, we will explore the barriers between the adult writer and the child reader throughout the semester. Children’s literature has been one of the most overlooked genres in the publishing industry. To examine the belated interest in the genre and existing gap between children and adults, this course covers narratives from various genres, periods, and cultures that are read to or by children. The course also includes a comparative analysis of original texts and their film adaptations. Some of the issues we will address through our primary sources are the origins and developments of literary works for children, major works and writers in the field, distinctive genres and their characteristics, social issues addressed in contemporary children’s literature, thematic transformation of children’s books in the last century, and misconceptions of books with illustrations. We will draw on materials that include folktales and texts from different continents and multiple ethnic communities in the US. Students will demonstrate what they learn through interpretive writing assignments and creative group projects. The course will also include presentations and online discussion forums.

  •      EN4600

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of AS4051 American Studies I
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One English credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods and a lab OR two 100-min. evening periods

    EN4600 Research Experience in the Humanities

    This interdisciplinary course introduces students to the rigorous pleasures of research in the humanities. Through work in and out of class, including visits by guest lecturers and trips to local archives and museums, students learn the basic skills of research, including the identification of a compelling intellectual interest and the transformation of that interest into a question that at once requires and excites research of the highest quality. Students then answer this question, in a provisional way, by work that leads first to the statement of a thesis (the answer to the question), then to the initial development of that statement in a shorter paper of ten to twelve pages. Successful completion of the course may also lead to summer research, internships, or apprenticeships with local scholars. Following this course, optional enrollment in EN4610 Research in the Humanities offers selected students the opportunity for more substantial work in their chosen fields of scholarship.

  •      EN4610

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of EN4600, AS4051/AS4052 American Studies I/II or Summer Research in the Humanities.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One English credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods and a lab OR two 100-min. evening periods

    EN4610 Research in the Humanities

    Research in Humanities encourages writing and reading that is at once critical and necessarily creative, for by these acts of interdisciplinary scholarship, students seek to construct new objects of knowledge—a knowledge commensurate with their experience of the world, informed and indeed altered by the works and words of others. This course is necessarily interdisciplinary, because it is, among other things, a critique of the division of labor within institutions of knowledge. In other words, even as it seeks to understand how disciplines such as anthropology, psychology, sociology, political science, economics, and literature constitute their objects of study (the human, the mind, society, etc.), it also attends carefully to the limits of disciplinary formation, to the ways in which the “human” or “nature” escape the classificatory systems within which they are defined and to which they are confined. Research in Humanities is organized around theories and practices of research in the humanities and the sciences. The study of theory is necessary because these researches should be critical and historical, interrogating both their subject’s conditions of possibility and the contemporary situation of their study. Each week, members of the seminar will consider different theoretical approaches to reading and writing about diverse texts. These approaches include, but are not limited to, political criticism, cultural and ethnic studies, feminism, gender and sexuality, historicism, and colonial and post-colonial critique. As for practice, students will learn how to conduct research and how to construct an effective thesis statement that will govern an argument developed and sustained throughout a paper of twenty- to twenty-five pages. The proper use of evidence, as well as considerations of evidentiary significance, will also be fundamental to the course’s concerns. Students will then transform their research into articles for scholarly publication, including NCSSM- Morganton's journal of interdisciplinary research in the humanities. They will serve on the editorial board for the journal, evaluating submissions, offering suggestions for revisions, and ensuring the timely delivery of the completed journal to the publisher.

  •      FR3651

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Prerequisite(s): Placement by Humanities Dept.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week

    FR3651 Navigating in French I

    Students continue to navigate their linguistic and cultural journeys in French. Students begin to read short narratives and comprehend a wider array of media produced in French. Students also begin to develop an understanding of nuances of the language. Students learn to negotiate meaning among individuals, interpret written and spoken meaning, and to present meaning via oral and written messages in present, preterite and imperfect tenses. Students further increase their proficiency in the language by reading short texts, viewing video programs, and using the language in everyday conversational situations that focus on themes such as French cuisine, food categories, daily routines, and health and illness. Students continue to explore cultural aspects of the French-speaking world. Students have access to web-based exercises and tutorials, video activities, individual and group projects, as well as film and documentaries, to aid them in the acquisition of grammatical concepts and new vocabulary.

  •      FR3652

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Prerequisite(s): FR3651 or permission of the Dean of Humanities
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week and a lab

    FR3652 Navigating in French II

    Students continue to navigate their linguistic and cultural journeys in French. Students continue to read short narratives and to comprehend a wider array of media produced in French. Students also continue to develop an understanding of nuances of the language. Students learn to negotiate meaning among individuals, interpret written and spoken meaning, and to present meaning via oral and written messages in all tenses previously learned, including the future, and conditional and subjunctive moods. Students further increase their proficiency in the language by reading short texts, viewing video programs, and using the language in everyday conversational situations that focus on themes such as technology and computers, doing business in the city, objects in the workplace, professions and their functions in the community, and the environment. Students continue to explore cultural aspects of the French-speaking world. Students have access to web-based exercises and tutorials, video activities, individual and group projects, as well as film and documentaries, to aid them in the acquisition of grammatical concepts and new vocabulary.

  •      FR4051

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Prerequisite(s): FR3652 or permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week

    FR4051 Advanced French for Global Applications I

    In this course, the exploration into language continues but expands to encompass elements that reflect the breadth and depth of the francophone world: the primary focus is culture, history, society, and literature of various French-speaking peoples. Through a rich program of original short films, audio activities, cultural readings, authentic literary selections, and a full-length short story, students improve their understanding of spoken French and develop their speaking, reading, and writing skills. Classroom activities emphasize communication, allowing students to interact and apply what they are learning. An accompanying web-based program provides additional language exercises to reinforce and enhance grammatical structures learned in previous courses. Students will become familiar with most grammatical structures and will learn to apply them in speaking and writing. The course content is theme-focused and speaks to current as well as perennial issues, such as values and beliefs, family dynamics and trends, gender, poverty, issues of immigration and assimilation, and problems of decolonization in francophone countries. These topics inform class discussions, skits, debates, oral presentations, and serve as the basis for writing in French. Students will begin the course by writing one-page personal reflections and, by the end of the term, advance to completing multi-page analytical, research-based essays.

  •      FR4652

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Prerequisite(s): FR3652 or permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week and a lab

    FR4652 Modern French Readings and Media

    Another important aspect of French is its major influence on modernist and post-modernist thought, literature, and art. In this course, students read, analyze, and discuss in French short stories, plays, poetry, and essays in conjunction with study of the fine arts, film, TV, and advertising to gain a deeper understanding of modern French and francophone cultures. Through the study of different media, students examine popular currents such as symbolism, surrealism, and existentialism that have shaped modern thought and philosophy. Previously-studied grammatical structures are reviewed, and more advanced grammar is introduced organically as it appears in the readings. Students sharpen all four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Independent projects allow students to pursue personal interests, and class activities are enriched by visits to local museums, theater productions, and film screenings, depending on available exhibitions and shows.

  •      HU4400

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Humanities Electives
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of AS4051/AS4052 American Studies I/II and OR completion of AS4051 and approval of the Dean of Humanities during Spring Administrative Adjustment. Juniors may not request this course until Spring Administrative Adjustment.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Humanities credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week and a lab

    HU4400 Black Studies

    Black Studies implements an interdisciplinary format to examine the cultural, political, and economic development of Black America. The course begins with the African Diaspora and culminates with the rise of Hip Hop culture. On one hand, the course examines a long history of white supremacy in Anglo-American thought and action that exploited black labor and delegitimized black lives. On the other hand, the course interrogates Black America's persistent fight for full citizenship and cultural autonomy—a domestic crusade that draws strength and meaning from anti-colonial struggles abroad. Students will continually ask: What defines "whiteness" and "blackness"? What functions do racial classifications serve? Overall, students locate the origins and development of the conflicts and commonalities at the heart of the Black American experience.

  •      HU4405

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Humanities Electives
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of AS4051/AS4052 American Studies I/II and OR completion of AS4051 and approval of the Dean of Humanities during Spring Administrative Adjustment. Juniors may not request this course until Spring Administrative Adjustment.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Humanities credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week OR two 100-min. evening periods

    HU4405 American Indian and Indigenous Studies

    This course introduces the interdisciplinary field of American Indian and Indigenous Studies and explores some of the diverse Native cultures, knowledge systems, histories, and research methods that make the field a dynamic and increasingly popular area of research. The course will explore the perspectives of Native peoples through literature, film, oral tradition, academic scholarship, and material culture. Using these expressions, students will analyze the significance of topics including land, community, sovereignty, treaty rights, self-determination, and environmental justice. Through research and reflection, students will leverage Native perspectives to unpack dominant historical narratives that facilitate settler colonialism and stereotypes of Native people that permeate popular portrayals. By the end of the course, students will apply interdisciplinary American Indian and Indigenous Studies research methods and analysis to examine a contemporary issue or topic that resonates with their interests.

  •      HU4420

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Humanities Electives
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Humanities credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week and a lab

    HU4420 Digital Humanities

    When you think about "technology" you probably don't think about the humanities, but inventions from the alphabet and the printing press to the internet browser, apps, and e-readers are all technologies that have shaped not only what and how we read but how we think. In the twenty-first century, texts and technologies are inextricably intertwined. Computational data analysis, topic modeling, GIS mapping, and data visualization give us more tools with which to explore the rich field of humanities, as we strive to understand what it means to be humans who read, write, interpret, and share texts. In Digital Humanities, students learn and apply a wide variety of computing methods and tools to the study of literature, history, art, and other subjects in the humanities and social sciences. A main feature of the course is the opportunity for students to apply these methods and tools to explore their own interests and areas of inquiry in a culminating research project. Digital Humanities lies at the intersection of the study of the humanities—literature and language, history, economics, psychology, sociology, and the arts—with the technologies, techniques, and tools of computational science.

  •      HU4435

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Humanities Electives
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of AS4051/AS4052 American Studies I/II and OR completion of AS4051 and approval of the Dean of Humanities during Spring Administrative Adjustment. Juniors may not request this course until Spring Administrative Adjustment.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Humanities credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week OR two 100-min. evening periods

    HU4435 Bioethics

    In our rapidly changing world, technological and medical advances pose ongoing challenges to achieving public consensus while protecting diverse lifestyles, cultures, and beliefs. This course will use interdisciplinary approaches to explore controversial topics within the scope of bioethics, a growing academic field dedicated to studying ethical problems arising at the intersection of culture, science, medicine, law, public policy, and biotechnology. Our goals are to examine the philosophical underpinnings of ethical theories, as well as their applications by health professionals, courts, and legislators; analyze and construct bioethical arguments; and engage in constructive and respectful debates in order to formulate our own moral positions. We will engage with controversies in such areas as neuroethics, medical tourism, organ donation and transplantation, biohacking, reproductive and pediatric ethics, euthanasia, genetic engineering, synthetic body parts and transhumanism, genetic enhancement, CRISPR gene editing, mental health, and racial disparities in healthcare, among others. Course activities will include discussion boards, case studies, in-class debates, reading quizzes, and media critiques. Students will be expected to keep up with bioethics in the news, as well as prepare and present additional research, either individually or in teams.

  •      HU4440

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Humanities Electives
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of AS4051/AS4052 American Studies I/II and OR completion of AS4051 and approval of the Dean of Humanities during Spring Administrative Adjustment. Juniors may not request this course until Spring Administrative Adjustment.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Humanities credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week and a lab

    HU4440 Film Studies

    Filmmaker Orson Welles once said, “A film is a ribbon of dreams. The camera is much more than a recording apparatus; it is a medium via which messages reach us from another world that is not ours and that brings us to the heart of a great secret. Here magic begins.” In a culture that increasingly relies on visual information, a comprehension of how meaning grows out of the moving image is essential. This course is a historical and critical survey of the motion picture both as a developing art form and as a medium of mass communication. The course entails systematic analysis of how filmmakers use sound and image to tell stories on the screen. Students view selected films as case studies to understand the relationship between theory and practice in filmmaking. Through explorations of the historical, social, and political dimensions of filmmaking, students learn to read and write more effectively, to look at the world with a critical eye, and most importantly, to develop a critical audio-visual literacy. Students demonstrate what they have learned through analytical writing assignments. The course may also include individual or group projects, presentations, creative writing, or short exercises in filmmaking.

  •      HU4460

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Humanities Electives
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): I/II and OR completion of AS4051 and approval of the Dean of Humanities during Spring Administrative Adjustment. Juniors may not request this course until Spring Administrative Adjustment.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Humanities credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods and a lab OR two 100-min. evening periods

    HU4460 Topics in Humanities I

    Erich Maria Remarque composed his famous novel All Quiet on the Western Front to “try and tell of a generation of men who, even though they may have escaped its shells, were destroyed by the war.” World War I, what those who lived through it called “The Great War,” destroyed not only tens of millions of human lives but also the entire European worldview of the 19th century. The war fundamentally altered the geopolitics of the modern world, spelling the beginning of the end of European colonialism and the rise of American global power. It also drastically changed how we understand the world around us. From the metaphors we use (“over the top”; “no man’s land”) to women’s suffrage, the struggle for racial equality, and our understanding of the roles of nationalism, rationalism, and science, the war’s impact on global culture has been profound and continues to the present day. Beginning with a study of the war itself, this course will explore the lasting geo-political, literary, cultural, and philosophical impacts of the war on our lives today. Sources will include histories of the conflict as well as the poetry, literature, and philosophical and cultural artifacts. A century after it ended, we are still living with The Great War’s legacy.

  •      HU4461

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Humanities Electives
    Prerequisite(s): American Studies I & II
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Humanities credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week and a lab

    HU4461 Topics in Humanities II

    HU4461 Topics in Humanities II: An Introduction to Western Thought
    Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World, published in 1932, is a classic dystopian look at the direction of our modern world. Huxley’s novel forces us to wrestle with the implications of consumerism, mass-production, and the practical application of science, and it raises profound questions about freedom, social control, and the pursuit of material appetites as the driver of society. The novel is also dated, reflecting the views and prejudices (and technology!) of its time. This course will use the novel as a lens through which to examine the fundamental philosophical, economic, and political ideas that have shaped the modern world: subjectivity, capitalism, and liberalism. Other sources will include Plato, the Hebrew Bible, Descartes, Thomas Hobbes, John Locke, Adam Smith, and Karl Marx. One of the key goals of the liberal arts is to prepare students to live in a free society. An important aspect of freedom is awareness of the forces shaping the world we live in. We will consider how these fundamental ideas developed; we will emphasize finding connections between ideas; we will examine how those ideas impact our own thinking; and we will develop analytical writing skills by responding to those ideas. The course will conclude with students working in teams to rewrite sections of Brave New World to update the novel and make it more relevant to the present day.

  •      HU4462

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Humanities Electives
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of AS4051/AS4052 American Studies I/II and OR completion of AS4051 and approval of the Dean of Humanities during Spring Administrative Adjustment. Juniors may not request this course until Spring Administrative Adjustment.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Humanities credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week OR two 100-min. evening periods

    HU4462 Topics in Humanities III

    This course examines systems of slavery from the ancient to the modern world. It will consider the impact of slaves and slavery on the culture, economy, and political system in the Americas, Africa, and Asia as well as the similarities and differences in the origin of slavery, its formation, its memory, and the legal status of enslaved individuals across historical eras and regions. Students will read narratives written by slaves describing their own experiences, religious and political texts related to enslavement, and other primary and secondary sources to examine various forms of slavery and ways in which enslaved people resisted their condition.

  •      HU4470

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Humanities Electives
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of AS4051/AS4052 American Studies I/II and OR completion of AS4051 and approval of the Dean of Humanities during Spring Administrative Adjustment. Juniors may not request this course until Spring Administrative Adjustment.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Humanities credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week OR two 100-min. evening periods

    HU4470 Topics in the Study of Religion: The Pursuit of Meaning

    From an evolutionary standpoint, humans have what biologist Richard Dawkins calls “purpose on the brain.” We seek patterns and meaning to help us make sense out of our lives, to help us to understand why we are here. Yet modernity and its scientific, materialistic worldview have caused traditional systems of meaning, such as religion and myth, to lose appeal for many people. This course will explore both religious and secular routes in the Western tradition to finding meaning in the modern world and helping students develop their critical thinking and writing skills as they examine key texts and reflect on their own worldviews. The course will begin with an examination of the question of meaning itself and then explore the stark alternatives many texts the Western tradition offers. We will consider classic absolutist texts concerning the question of God and human purpose, from such writers as Plato, Anselm, and Thomas Aquinas. We will then turn to more contemporary relativist thinkers such as Jean Paul Sartre and Richard Dawkins. Finally, we will weigh the possibilities of a middle ground in writers such as Charles Hartshorne, Viktor Frankl, and Martin Buber and consider the contemporary relevance of myth as a source of meaning.

  •      HU4490

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Humanities Electives
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of AS4051/AS4052 American Studies I/II and OR completion of AS4051 and approval of the Dean of Humanities during Spring Administrative Adjustment. Juniors may not request this course until Spring Administrative Adjustment.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Humanities credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week and a lab

    HU4490 Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

    An interdisciplinary introduction to the field of Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, this course explores feminist perspectives on intersecting inequalities. Topics include: work and labor; sexuality and sexual identity; gender relations; images of women and gender in literature, science and technology, religion, and art; family structures and domestic roles; and the history of feminist struggles. Course readings are drawn from the humanities and the social sciences. We will use discussion, lecture, film, reading, written texts, and popular culture to help students continue to develop their skills in reading, critical thinking, writing, presenting, and working collaboratively with their peers to answer questions such as: How do the experiences of women and other subordinated groups help us to understand gender norms, identity categories, and sexuality? How might one perform, analyze, interrogate, and challenge what has been constructed as “normal” in contemporary western culture? This class explores a multitude of feminist perspectives on the intersections of gender, race, sexuality, class, physical ability, nationality, age and other categories of identity. Students will interrogate these categories as socially-constructed while acknowledging that these constructions have real effects in subordinating groups, marking bodies and creating structural, intersectional inequalities.

  •      MA1000

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Mathematics
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): Core Math
    Graduation Requirements Met: One elective credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: Additional elective
    Meeting Times: Two periods per week

    MA1000 Precalculus Corequisite

    The corequisite course for Precalculus is designed to provide necessary support for those students also enrolled in MA4000: Precalculus I who have demonstrated, through the Math placement testing process, a need to brush up on previous math topics.

  •      MA1030

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Mathematics
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): Core Math
    Graduation Requirements Met: One elective credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: Additional elective
    Meeting Times: Two periods per week and a lab

    MA1030 Calculus Corequisite

    The corequisite course for Calculus is designed to provide necessary support for those students also enrolled in MA4030: AP Calculus BC I who have demonstrated, through the Math placement testing process, a need to brush up on previous math topics.

  •      MA1044

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Mathematics
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): MA4044 Calculus II with AP Exam Prep
    Graduation Requirements Met: One elective credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: Additional elective
    Meeting Times: One period per week

    MA1044 Calculus II Exam Prep

  •      MA4000

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Mathematics
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Mathematics credit OR One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    MA4000 Precalculus & Modeling w/ Advanced Topics I

    This course is devoted to developing a toolkit of functions that serves as a bridge between mathematics and the world it models. The toolkit includes explicitly defined functions such as exponential, polynomial, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions, as well as functions that are defined recursively and parametrically. Students investigate functions, bivariate data, and models with graphing calculators and computers. Both graphical and analytical approaches to problem solving are emphasized. Students also complete lab activities and present their results in formal written reports. This is one part of a 2-semester course sequence (MA4000 and MA4002). Students must enroll in both semesters when registering. Once enrolled students may not drop a single semester without approval from the Dean of Mathematics.

  •      MA4002

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Mathematics
    Prerequisite(s): MA4000 or permission of the Dean of Math
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Mathematics credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    MA4002 Precalculus & Modeling w/ Advanced Topics II

    This course is devoted to developing a toolkit of functions that serves as a bridge between mathematics and the world it models. The toolkit includes explicitly defined functions such as exponential, polynomial, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions, as well as functions that are defined recursively and parametrically. Students investigate functions, bivariate data, and models with graphing calculators and computers. Both graphical and analytical approaches to problem solving are emphasized. Students also complete lab activities and present their results in formal written reports. This is one part of a 2-semester course sequence (MA4000 and MA4002). Students must enroll in both semesters when registering. Once enrolled students may not drop a single semester without approval from the Dean of Mathematics.

  •      MA4030

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Mathematics
    Prerequisite(s): Course-ending grade of B+ or higher in MA4002 Precalculus & Modeling w/ Advanced Topics II
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit OR One Mathematics credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    MA4030 AP Calculus BC w/ Advanced Topics I

    This course provides students with a fast-paced introduction to the concepts of differential calculus and the applications of calculus to mathematical modeling. Through class discussions, problem solving, laboratory experiences, and writing assignments students discover the important concepts of calculus, develop an understanding of these concepts, and use these concepts in solving realistic problems. This course generally includes the completion of a substantial mathematical modeling project. Calculators and computers are used as tools in the course. Topics normally covered include the derivative, local linearity of functions, linear approximations, some applications of the derivative, l'Hopital's rule and the concept of a limit. This is one part of a 2-semester course sequence (MA4030 and MA4032). Students must enroll in both semesters when registering. Once enrolled students may not drop a single semester without approval from the Dean of Mathematics.

  •      MA4032

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Mathematics
    Prerequisite(s): B- or higher, or approval of the Dean of Math in MA4030 AP Calculus BC w/ Advanced Topics I
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit OR One Mathematics credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    MA4032 AP Calculus BC w/ Advanced Topics II

    This course continues the accelerated study of calculus and its applications to mathematical modeling. Through class discussions, problem solving, laboratory experiences, and writing assignments students discover the important concepts of calculus, develop an understanding of these concepts, and use these concepts in solving realistic problems. This course generally includes the completion of a substantial mathematical modeling project. Calculators and computers are used as tools in the course. Topics normally covered include additional applications of the derivative, an introduction to differential equations, slope fields, Euler's method, definite and indefinite integrals, numerical approximations of integrals, calculating area and total change of a function, and some applications of integrals. Students also focus on skills necessary for success on the AP BC Calculus examination. This is one part of a 2-semester course sequence (MA4030 and MA4032). Students must enroll in both semesters when registering. Once enrolled students may not drop a single semester without approval from the Dean of Mathematics.

  •      MA4042

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Mathematics
    Prerequisite(s): Course-ending grade of B+ or higher in MA4002 Precalculus & Modeling w/ Advanced Topics II
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Mathematics credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    MA4042 Calculus I

    This course provides students with an introduction to the concepts of differential calculus and the applications of calculus to mathematical modeling. Through class discussions, problem solving, laboratory experiences, and writing assignments students discover the important concepts of calculus, develop an understanding of these concepts, and use these concepts in solving realistic problems. This course generally includes the completion of a substantial mathematical modeling project. Calculators and computers are used as tools in the course. Topics typically covered include the concept of a limit, the derivative, local linearity of functions, linear approximations, applications of the derivative, l'Hopital's rule, and an introduction to integration and integration techniques. This is one part of a 2-semester course sequence (MA4040 and MA4042 or MA4040 and MA4044). Students must enroll in both semesters when registering. Once enrolled, students may not drop a single semester without approval from the Dean of Mathematics.

  •      MA4044

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Mathematics
    Prerequisite(s): B- or higher in MA4042 Calculus I, or approval of the Dean of Math
    Corequisite(s): MA1044
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Mathematics credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    MA4044 Calculus II w/AP Prep

    This course is identical to MA4044 Calculus II, except that students enrolled in MA4042 are also enrolled in MA1042 Calculus II Exam Prep and plan to take the AP Calculus BC exam. NOTE: Students in MA4044 and 4042 will be in the same classroom for the course. If a student would like to drop MA1042 Calculus II Exam Prep, then their core course would change to MA4044 Calculus II.

  •      MA4046

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Mathematics
    Prerequisite(s): B- or higher in MA4042 Calculus I, or approval of the Dean of Math
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Mathematics credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    MA4046 Calculus II

    This course continues the accelerated study of calculus and its applications to mathematical modeling from Calculus I. Through class discussions, problem solving, laboratory experiences, and writing assignments students discover the important concepts of calculus, develop an understanding of these concepts, and use these concepts in solving realistic problems. This course generally includes the completion of a substantial mathematical modeling project. Calculators and computers are used as tools in the course. Topics typically covered include an introduction to differential equations, slope fields, Euler's method, definite and indefinite integrals, numerical approximations of integrals, advanced integration techniques, applications of integrals, Taylor polynomials, and series (including power series). This is the second part of a 2-semester course sequence (MA4040 and MA4042 or MA4040 and MA4044). Students must enroll in both semesters when registering. Once enrolled, students may not drop a single semester without approval from the Dean of Mathematics.

  •      MA4050

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Mathematics
    Prerequisite(s): B- or higher in MA4046 Calculus II or MA4044 Calculus II w/AP Prep, or permission of the Dean of Math
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Mathematics credit OR One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    MA4050 Modeling with Differential Equations

    In this course students examine what differential equations are and how they are used to model real-world phenomena. They also look at different techniques for solving differential equations and interpret their solutions in a real world context. Matrices and vector functions will be utilized to help prepare students for future coursework in Calculus and Linear Algebra. Analytical methods, geometric methods, and numerical methods are included. Technology is an important component of the course.

  •      MA4060

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Mathematics
    Prerequisite(s): B- or higher in MA4046 Calculus II or MA4044 Calculus II w/AP Prep, or permission of the Dean of Math
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Mathematics credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    MA4060 Multivariable Calculus

    This course includes the theory and application of vector functions and partial derivatives. Topics include a vector approach to regression modeling, the Frenet-Serret equations, continuity and differentiability of functions of several variables, gradients and directional derivatives, and classic optimization problems. Numerical methods such as Newton's Method for solving non-linear systems and modeling with vector-valued functions of scalar and scalar-valued functions of a vector are included.

  •      MA4110

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Mathematics
    Prerequisite(s): MA4000 Precalculus & Modeling w/ Advanced Topics I
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit OR One Mathematics credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    MA4110 Foundations of Data Science

    This course combines three perspectives: inferential thinking, computational thinking, and real-world relevance. Given data arising from some real-world phenomenon, how does one analyze that data so as to understand that phenomenon? The course teaches critical concepts and skills in computer programming and statistical inference, in conjunction with hands-on analysis of real-world datasets, including economic data, document collections, geographical data, and social networks. It delves into social issues surrounding data analysis such as privacy and design.

  •      MA4250

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Mathematics
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Mathematics credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    MA4250 History of Mathematics

    History of Mathematics provides historical context for the evolution of mathematical thinking from the development of counting systems and early geometry to modern applications of calculus and data science. The course focuses on both mathematical concepts and the mathematicians who discovered them, with special emphasis on the contributions of women and cultures outside the traditional Indo-European pathway that led to Western mathematics. This course is a writing intensive course, requiring students to communicate about and with mathematics in its historical context.

  •      MA4260

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Mathematics
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): MA4110 Foundations of Data Science
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Mathematics credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    MA4260 Introduction to Operations Research

    Introduction to Operations Research is a survey of methods and applications to model and analyze real-world problems, especially in the business realm. Examples of problem areas and solution techniques studied Multi-Criteria Decision Making and Decision Trees (making decisions given varied criteria like in choosing a college), Mathematical Programming (linear, binary, integer) (choosing best production mix given limited resources), Shortest Paths, Transportation Planning (making delivery routes), Assignment Problems (pairing customers with suppliers), and Simulations (simulating decisions to find optimal outcomes).

  •      MA4320

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Mathematics
    Prerequisite(s): MA4046 Calculus II or MA4044 Calculus II w/AP Prep, or permission of the Dean of Math
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Mathematics credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    MA4320 Linear Algebra with Applications

    This course is a study of systems of linear equations, matrices, vectors, vector spaces, linear transformations, eigenvalues, eigenvectors, orthogonality and matrix decompositions. This course will focus on applications including least-squares solutions, Markov chains, and systems of linear differential equations as well as proof writing.

  •      MA4330

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Mathematics
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Mathematics credit OR One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    MA4330 Non-Euclidean Geometry

    Non-Euclidean geometries were developed in response to the controversial 5th axiom of Euclidean geometry. Altering this axiom yields spherical and hyperbolic geometries, which have very distinct properties from each other and from Euclidean geometry; for example, the angle sum of a triangle is no longer 180 degrees. In this course, students will develop their ability to make thoughtful conjectures, and to verify those conjectures with valid mathematical arguments. At the end of the course, students will apply these proof-writing techniques to mathematical settings beyond geometry. Throughout the course, emphasis will placed on communicating mathematics through both writing and presentations. No prior knowledge of Euclidean geometry is needed.

  •      MA4340

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Mathematics
    Prerequisite(s): AP Calculus BC
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Mathematics credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    MA4340 Topics in Mathematics

  •      MA4500

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Mathematics
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Mathematics credit OR One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    MA4500 Graph Theory with REX Math

    This course develops the theory and application of graphs, a major area of modern mathematics, and also provides an introduction to mathematical proof and research. Students develop their ability to make thoughtful conjectures, and to verify those conjectures with valid mathematical arguments. This is done by considering questions of graph structures and colorings, tree and path optimization, matrix representations, and some open questions in the field. Students are then required to investigate an open problem in which they demonstrate their ability to make conjectures and to write concise, complete, and coherent proofs. Strong interest and talent in mathematics are required.

  •      MA4510

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Mathematics
    Prerequisite(s): MA4500 AND Research Program Application, MA4330 AND Research Program Application, or permission of the Dean of Math
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit OR One Mathematics credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week and a lab

    MA4510 Research in Mathematics

    This course is designed for students who have completed calculus and would like to work on a research team investigating an unsolved problem in mathematics. Since the research questions usually arise from the fields of graph theory and complex systems, students are encouraged to complete MA4500 Graph Theory with REX Math and MA4230 Introduction to Complex Systems prior to enrolling or to have completed comparable coursework in 9th or 10th grade.

  •      MA4512

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Mathematics
    Prerequisite(s): MA4510 Research in Mathematics I OR MA4520 Advanced Mathematical Topics I OR MA4522 Advanced Mathematics Topics II
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Mathematics credit OR One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week and a lab

    MA4512 Research in Mathematics II

    This course continues the project begun in MA4510. Students write a formal paper presenting the background of the problem and any prior results found by other researchers. The students' results are then presented in standard mathematical form with all necessary detail in the proofs and corollaries presented. If the students' results warrant, the paper may be submitted for publication.

  •      MR3080

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Interdisciplinary Electives
    Prerequisite(s): No prerequisite courses required, however, students must apply, be accepted, and fully commit to the Mentorship Program. This course is required for juniors selected to the NCSSM Mentorship program via application reviewed by Director of Mentorship and Research and committee. The successful completion of this course with a minimum of a B is required to be accepted to continue the NCSSM Mentorship experience in the summer for Mentorship 1 students, in academic year for Mentorship 2 students, and summer/academic year for Mentorship 3 students.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One elective credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: One period per week

    MR3080 Mentorship: Foundations in Research

    Foundations in Mentorship is a required course for NCSSM junior online and residential students selected for NCSSM Mentorship Program to prepare students to engage in their Mentorship experience with an off-campus mentor in the upcoming summer and/or academic year. This course equips students with research skills to be a proactive participant in an ongoing or independent research and the personal success skills necessary for the social and communication dynamics in a professional environment. Students will identify their strengths and weaknesses, implement tools for developing and evaluating goals, , and develop critical thinking skills as they apply techniques to acquire, read, understand, and synthesize primary research or professional literature or sources as well as engage in small group interactions to discuss peer reviewed research articles. As part of this course, students will begin a portfolio of materials demonstrating their growth and skill development, including a set of readings that relate to their research and a record of their reflection and activities throughout the journey. In addition, students will complete all necessary tasks to identify and secure a mentor for the student’s upcoming research experience and to be in compliance for their off-campus Mentorship experience.

  •      MR4050a

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Interdisciplinary Electives
    Prerequisite(s): MR3080
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: None - Other
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Five periods per week

    MR4050a Mentorship: Senior Research I

  •      MR4051

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Interdisciplinary Electives
    Prerequisite(s): MR3080 / Permission of Mentorship Director
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: None - Other
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Five periods per week

    MR4051 Mentorship: Senior Research II

  •      MU3500

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Music
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One elective credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: Additional elective
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week

    MU3500 Classical Piano and Guitar

    This course is a comprehensive study of instrumental music and theory through the idioms of piano and guitar. Largely self-paced, this course provides students the opportunity to learn the music repertoire and performance practice of guitar or piano. Students learn playing technique, note reading, chords, harmony, rhythm, and pitch. Students choose guitar or piano as their primary instrument. The course includes written music theory assignments, assigned songs to learn and perform for the instructor, a semester exam, and in-class performances. There is no prerequisite for this course. Students of all levels and experience are eligible. Repeatable for credit.

  •      MU4100

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Music
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One elective credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: Additional elective
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week including lab, or two 100-minute even

    MU4100 Chorale

    NCSSM's Chorale is a vocal ensemble that studies and performs a variety of choral literature. This ensemble performs masterworks of choral literature in collaboration annually with other NCSSM musical ensembles. Concepts emphasized include ensemble techniques, vocal production, solfeggio, note reading, and other aspects of choral music. Interested students are encouraged to register for all semesters of this course. Some scheduled weekend rehearsals and weekend concerts. Repeatable for credit.

    Note: Some scheduled weekend rehearsals and weekend concerts.

  •      MU4120

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Music
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One elective credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: Additional elective
    Meeting Times: Three periods and a lab OR two 100-min. evening periods

    MU4120 Jazz Performance Workshop

    This course is a comprehensive study of jazz music and theory. Students focus on the study of jazz literature, jazz styles, and improvisational skills. Largely self-paced, this course provides students the opportunity to learn jazz literature, theory, and performance practice. Students learn jazz technique, note reading, chords, harmony, rhythm, and style. The course includes written music theory assignments, assigned songs to learn and perform for the instructor, and in-class performances with public performances scheduled as appropriate. Students of all levels and experience are eligible. Repeatable for credit.

    Note: Some scheduled weekend rehearsals and weekend concerts.

  •      MU4140

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Music
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One elective credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: Additional elective
    Meeting Times: Three periods and a lab OR two 100-min. evening periods

    MU4140 Topics in Music Performance I: Steel Drums and Percussion Ensemble

    NCSSM's Percussion Ensemble is a performing ensemble with an emphasis on standard percussion ensemble arrangements, repertoire, and percussion technique. Concepts emphasized include rhythm, ensemble musicianship, performance technique, and musical interpretation. Interested students are encouraged to register for all semesters of this course. Repeatable for credit.

  •      MU4150

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Music
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One elective credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: Additional elective
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week

    MU4150 Topics in Music Performance II: Solo Repertoire and Performance (Woodwind, Brass, Strings, Pe

    This course is a comprehensive study of instrumental music and theory through the idioms of instrumental and vocal solo repertoire. Largely self-paced, this course provides students the opportunity to learn the music repertoire and performance practice of their chosen instrument in the academic setting. Students learn playing technique, note reading, chords, harmony, rhythm, and pitch. Students choose their primary instrument (or voice). The course includes written music theory assignments, assigned songs to learn and perform for the instructor, a semester exam, and in-class performances. There is no prerequisite for this course. Students of all levels and experience are eligible. Repeatable for credit.

  •      MU4160

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Music
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One elective credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: Additional elective
    Meeting Times: Three periods and a lab OR two 100-min. evening periods

    MU4160 Music Performance Ensemble

    The NCSSM Music Performance Ensemble is a mixed music ensemble with an emphasis on ensemble instrumental and/or vocal music literature. Students who are interested in band, orchestra or chorus should register for this course. Concepts emphasized include performance technique, tone production, ensemble intonation, musical interpretation, and advanced string technique. Interested students are encouraged to register for all semesters of this course. Some scheduled weekend rehearsals and weekend concerts. Repeatable for credit.

  •      MU4170

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Music
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One elective credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: Additional elective
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week OR two 100-min. evening periods

    MU4170 Topics in Music Performance III: Solo Repertoire and Performance (Vocal)

    This course is a comprehensive study of solo repertoire in music and theory through singing performance in varied styles. Largely self-paced, this course provides students the opportunity to learn the music repertoire, techniques and performance practice of voice in the academic setting. Students will learn vocal techniques, historical context, multiple languages, stylistic techniques and performance practice, harmony, rhythm, and pitch. The course includes written theoretical assignments, assigned songs to learn and perform for the instructor, language work, a semester exam, and in-class performances. There is no prerequisite for this course. Students of all levels and experience are eligible. Repeatable for credit.

  •      MU4300

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Music
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One elective credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: Additional elective
    Meeting Times: Asynchronous online course,One period per week

    MU4300 Music Theory and Composition

    This course provides an understanding of classical and contemporary trends in music composition. Students learn fundamental concepts of music theory while learning how to use the latest technologies in musical notation. Students explore songwriting and music composition for various instruments. After understanding fundamental concepts and developing basic skills, students recognize and analyze contemporary trends in music composition and compose and arrange their own music.

  •      MU4310

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Music
    Prerequisite(s): MU4300
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One elective credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: Additional elective
    Meeting Times: Asynchronous online course

    MU4310 AP Music Theory

    This course is a continuation of MU4300 Music Theory and Composition, with an emphasis on preparation for the AP Music Theory exam. Major concepts include musical terminology, analysis, ear training, four-part writing for orchestra and voice, and musical forms. Two periods per week with additional asynchronous online components

  •      PA1008

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Physical Activity & Wellness
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Physical Activity credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: Additional elective
    Meeting Times: One period per week and a lab

    PA1008 Self Defense

    Self Defense is a course designed to introduce the students to the three A’s of Self Defense. Students will learn awareness, assessment, and action that are critical skills for maintaining personal safety. We will integrate these elements into an effective approach that defines self-defense as a state of mental and physical preparedness.

  •      PA1009

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Physical Activity & Wellness
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Physical Activity credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: Additional elective
    Meeting Times: One period per week and a lab

    PA1009 Hiking

    Course will cover acquiring values from a lifelong activity that contributes to a healthy lifestyle.  Students will be able to understand the rules and etiquette of hiking on the road, greenways and trails, be able to plan and lead a successful hike and will learn about more complex hiking through a NC Park Ranger. Students will learn how to track fitness and make it a part of a healthy lifestyle.

  •      PA1020

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Physical Activity & Wellness
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Physical Activity credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: Additional elective
    Meeting Times: One period per week and a lab

    PA1020 Fit for Life

    This class is designed to help you develop healthy habits that will last a lifetime. The initial part of the course gives hands-on experience with the state-of-the-art equipment in our campus fitness rooms, including free weights, weight machines, and cardio equipment. You'll also have the opportunity to learn new skills, try different sports, and explore the great outdoors. Individual, team sports, and outdoor sport education activities are offered. This course is tailored to individual and class interests.

  •      PH3040

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Physics
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    PH3040 Astronomy

    This introductory astronomy course focuses on using observations to create predictive models. Physics and chemistry concepts are introduced as needed. Topics include the motion of the night sky, seasons, phases of the moon, our solar system, photometry, spectroscopy, and stellar structure. Students use computers extensively to analyze data and access resources. Opportunities for binocular and nighttime sky observations are available. NOTE: Due to overlap of some content and mastery beyond the scope of this course, this is not an appropriate course for students who have completed Astrophysics.

  •      PH3500

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Physics
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Physics credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    PH3500 Physics Core: Mechanics

    This course provides an algebra-based foundation in the processes of physics, with an emphasis on qualitative and quantitative reasoning. Topics explored focus primarily on mechanics (including forces, momentum, and energy) and an introduction to electrostatics. Students gain experience with problem solving, laboratory practice, and scientific communication. Successful completion of this course will prepare students to take a variety of courses that satisfy the physics graduation requirement.

  •      PH3920

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Physics
    Prerequisite(s): Physics Core Course (PH3500 or PH4020)
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Physics credit OR One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    PH3920 Waves Sound, and Optics

    This course investigates the physics and application of waves, with emphasis on sound and light waves. We will study how waves are produced, travel, and interact with materials, how sound waves are used to create music, and how light waves are used in technologies including microscopes, spectrometers, interferometers, and lasers. Topics covered include wave properties; wave behaviors including reflection, refraction, interferences, and diffraction; physics of music; geometric optics; and physics of color. The course has a strong lab component, and students will have the opportunity to complete several short projects. This course includes topics that satisfy the physics graduation requirement.

  •      PH4000

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Physics
    Prerequisite(s): PH3500 Physics Core: Mechanics
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Physics credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    PH4000 Physics Core: E&M

    This course provides an algebra-based foundation in the areas of Electromagnetism and Waves, with an emphasis on qualitative and quantitative reasoning. Electrostatics concepts learned in Physics Core - Mechanics will be expanded upon and new topics will be explored including Mechanical Waves, Simple Harmonic Motion, Circuits, and Magnetism. Students gain experience with problem solving, laboratory practice, and scientific communication. This course, together with Physics Core: Mechanics, covers the majority of material typically found in a year-long introductory course. This course includes topics that satisfy the physics core elective requirement.

  •      PH4020

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Physics
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Physics credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    PH4020 Physics Core: Mechanics (Math Intensive) (*M*)

    This course provides a precalculus-based foundation in the processes of physics, with an emphasis on qualitative and quantitative reasoning. Topics explored focus primarily on mechanics (including forces, momentum, and energy) and an introduction to electrostatics. Students gain experience with problem solving, laboratory practice, and scientific communication. Successful completion of this course will prepare students to take a variety of courses that satisfy the core physics elective requirement.

  •      PH4120

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Physics
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of PH4020 or permission of the Chair of Physics
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Physics credit OR One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    PH4120 Physics Core: E&M (Math Intensive) (*M*)

    This course provides a precalculus-based foundation in the areas of Electromagnetism and Waves, with an emphasis on qualitative and quantitative reasoning. Topics explored will include an expansion on electrostatics from PH401Core, Mechanical Waves, Simple Harmonic Motion, Circuits, and Magnetism. Students gain experience with problem solving, laboratory practice, and scientific communication. Together with PH401, this course covers the majority of material typically found in a year long introductory course. This course includes topics that satisfy the physics graduation requirement. Credit cannot be earned for both PH353 EM and PH401 EM.

  •      PH4130

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Physics
    Prerequisite(s): PH3500 Physics Core: Mechanics; PH4020 Physics Core: Mechanics (MI) or PH4240 AP Physics C Mechanics
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit OR One Physics credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    PH4130 Computational Physics

    Students are introduced to basic methods of numerical analysis and programming. Students learn basic programming skills, program structure, and write programs in the Python programming language to solve problems utilizing these methods. Students will write programs to visually represent and analyze laboratory-collected data and big data. Students also create simulations of physics events both numerically and visually. Analyzed systems will include oscillatory systems and electromagnetic systems. This course includes topics that satisfy the physics core elective requirement.

  •      PH4180

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Physics
    Prerequisite(s): Core Physics Course (PH3500 or PH4020)
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit OR One Physics credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    PH4180 Astrophysics (*R*)

    This course uses ideas from physics (such as properties of light, Newtonian gravity, and special and general relativity) to investigate topics such as the solar system, stars, and cosmology. Mathematical modeling is emphasized throughout the course as an important tool for astrophysicists, as are scientific communication and research practices. The course ends with students completing a major research project on a topic that they find particularly interesting. This course includes topics that satisfy the physics core elective requirement.

  •      PH4240

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Physics
    Prerequisite(s): Final grades of A- or higher in PH3500 Physics Core Mechanics and PH4000 Physics Core: Electromagnetism and Waves or final grades of B+ or higher in PH4020 Physics Core: Mechanics (MI) and PH4120 Physics Core: Electromagnetism and Waves (Math Intensive). Students with previous lab-based physics courses who wish to take AP-C Physics should read the FAQs for Junior Physics Placement or Senior Physics Placement for alternative ways to qualify for enrollment in this course.
    Corequisite(s): Calculus I or Calculus II
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Physics credit OR One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    PH4240 AP Physics C: Mechanics

    This course provides an in depth study of classical mechanics: Newton’s Laws, conservation of energy, conservation of momentum, and an in depth study of angular momentum, rotational mechanics, oscillating systems and gravitational fields. There is a strong problem-solving emphasis throughout the course and a lab component. Calculus is used where needed and is treated at a level appropriate to students who are taking AP Calculus BC. Completion of PH404 may be used to prepare for the Mechanics portion of the AP C Physics examination, but its breadth and depth are significantly higher than that of a typical AP C Physics course.

  •      PH4241

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Physics
    Prerequisite(s): Final grade of B or higher in PH4240 AP Physics C: Mechanics, or modified exemption and final grade of B+ or higher in PH4120 Physics Core: Electromagnetism and Waves (Math Intensive), or exemption, and MA4030 AP Calculus BC (I).
    Corequisite(s): MA4032 AP Calculus BC (II)
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Physics credit OR One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    PH4241 AP Physics C: E&M

    This course provides a detailed study of electromagnetism. The course begins with an overview of electric forces and fields, Gauss' law, capacitance, and voltage. Later topics include electric circuits (R, RC, and RL), electromagnetism, Ampere's law, induction, and the Faraday/Lenz law. Emphasis is on the completion of the AP C Physics curriculum. There is a strong problem-solving emphasis and the course includes a lab component. Calculus is used where needed and is treated at a level appropriate to students who have taken AP Calculus BC. Completion of this course may be used to prepare for the electricity and magnetism portion of the AP C Physics examination. The breadth and depth of this course are significantly higher than that of a typical AP C physics course.

  •      PH4920

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Physics
    Prerequisite(s): By application in the Fall of the Junior year.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: January Term
    Schedule Requirements Met: January Term
    Meeting Times: Two week intensive January Term

    PH4920 Research in Physics I (*R*)

    This is an advanced course for January Term junior students with the maturity, independence, and motivation necessary to conduct their own research project. Students learn the scientific method and experimental design before conducting a trial experiment on a small scale. Students then write a mini- literature review on the topic of interest to them. Throughout the term students read from the primary scientific literature and participate in discussion groups on current issues in biological research. 

    Students who are accepted and enrolled in Research in Physics are expected to complete the entire sequence of courses including participation in 3 weeks of summer research on campus.  This entire sequence includes 2 weeks of Jan Term in your junior year, Spring semester of your junior year, summer (3 weeks of SRIP) between the junior and senior year and Fall semester of your senior year. 

    Students must have a grade of B or higher to continue the sequence and have no major conduct violations to participate in SRIP.

    Fall 
    Jan Term 
    Spring 
    Summer 
    Jr Year 
    JTerm I
    Spring 
    SRIP
    Sr Year
    Fall

  •      PH4921

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Physics
    Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of the immersive two week JanTerm course PH4920 Research in Physics I. Students with Junior standing apply in the Fall for entry to the Research in Physics sequence.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit OR One Physics credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Seven periods per week and three labs

    PH4921 Research in Physics II (*R*)

    This is an advanced course for second semester junior students with the maturity, independence, and motivation necessary to conduct their own research project. Students learn the scientific method and experimental design before conducting a trial experiment on a small scale. Students write a literature review on a topic of interest to them. Students then write a detailed research proposal and defend it to a panel of their peers. If time permits, students begin to learn techniques and to gather data for their experiments. Throughout the term, students read from the primary scientific literature and participate in discussion groups on current issues in physics research. Based on the outcomes of the term's work, students may be given an opportunity to participate in summer research programs on campus. 

    Students who are accepted and enrolled in Research in Physics are expected to complete the entire sequence of courses including participation in 3 weeks of summer research on campus.  This entire sequence includes 2 weeks of Jan Term in your junior year, Spring semester of your junior year, summer (3 weeks of SRIP) between the junior and senior year and Fall semester of your senior year. 

    Students must have a grade of B or higher to continue the sequence and have no major conduct violations to participate in SRIP.

    Fall 
    Jan Term 
    Spring 
    Summer 
    Jr Year 
    JTerm I
    Spring 
    SRIP
    Sr Year
    Fall

  •      PH4922

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Physics
    Prerequisite(s): PH4921 Research in Physics II, or permission of Chair of Physics.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One STEM credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Seven periods per week and three labs

    PH4922 Research in Physics III (*R*)

    Students continue work on their previous research to produce additional data and conduct statistical analysis, as needed. They may research extension questions based on their original work. Students write a formal research paper and prepare a formal presentation. Students are required to present their results at the NCSSM Research Symposium in the spring and are encouraged to present their research at the North Carolina Student Academy of Science competition and other competitions.

  •      RE1002

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Student Life
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Residential Education credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: Additional elective
    Meeting Times: One period per week

    RE1002 Cornerstone

    Using a holistic education approach of self-discovery, self-realization, and wellness, this course helps students integrate into the life and culture of NCSSM and to establish the foundation necessary for academic and personal success in the classroom, in relationships, and in community living at NCSSM and beyond. Topics include time management, conflict management and healthy relationships, diversity, and resume-writing and interview skills.

  •      RE1010

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Student Life
    Prerequisite(s): RE1002
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Residential Education credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: Additional elective
    Meeting Times: One period per week

    RE1010 Exploring MultiCultural Amer

    Students will explore issues of race, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, gender, sexual orientation, disability, religion and faith and their impact in the social world. Students will also reflect on their own experiences, identities, biases, and how each has shaped their own worldview.

  •      RE1012

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Student Life
    Prerequisite(s): RE1002
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Residential Education credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: Additional elective
    Meeting Times: One period per week

    RE1012 Public Speaking

    Public speaking aims to inform, convince, influence, persuade, or entertain a group of people. The development of public speaking skills, valuable in itself, can also contribute to one's self-confidence, organizational skills, listening skills, and anxiety-management. In this course, students learn to write and deliver effective speeches. This includes learning the effective use of presentation aids, supporting arguments, communication ethics, and speech organization.

  •      RE1016

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Student Life
    Prerequisite(s): RE1002
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Residential Education credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: One period per week

    RE1016 Marketing You

    This course utilizes discussion and cooperative learning experiences to help students identify their strengths and learn how to best market themselves in the professional world. Focus is on using social media as a tool to identify promising career options, writing an effective resume, and learning techniques for professional interviews.

  •      RE1018

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Student Life
    Prerequisite(s): RE1002
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Residential Education credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: Additional elective
    Meeting Times: One period per week

    RE1018 Excellence in Leadership

  •      RE1020

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Student Life
    Prerequisite(s): RE1002
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Residential Education credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: Additional elective
    Meeting Times: One period per week

    RE1020 Financial Planning

    Many high school and college graduates find themselves in serious financial trouble and in a debt cycle that can be difficult to reverse, causing the deferment or loss of some of their plans and dreams. Learning some simple and sound money management skills during high school can help students take charge of their financial future and can help set them on the path to realizing their important life goals. In this course, students learn basic money management skills such as budgeting, borrowing, earnings, investing, financial services, identity protection, and insurance. We teach practical application of these skills that students can put to immediate use.

  •      RE1022

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Student Life
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One Residential Education credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: Additional elective
    Meeting Times: One period per week

    RE1022 College and Career

    The course is designed to allow students to successfully transition from NCSSM to their future college or university environment. Designed to be taken in the third trimester junior year or the first trimester senior year, Transitioning to Higher Education prepares students through focusing on three key aspects of higher education: the college selection process, the college application process, and campus life. Lessons on the college selection process help students to identify types of colleges and universities, to understand how elements of a college or university may impact their educational experience, and to learn how to find colleges and universities that are a good fit for them. Lessons focused on the college application process are designed to help students understand deadlines and terms associated with the college application process, to connect students to resources to reduce costs, and to provide students an opportunity to gain experience developing applications and essays. Campus life lessons focus on the total cost of attending a college or university, programs on college campuses such as study abroad and living learning communities, and transitioning from the NCSSM experience to their unique college or university experience

  •      SE4001

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Student Life
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One elective credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week

    SE4001 Emergency. Care

    This course prepares students to recognize and respond appropriately to cardiac, breathing, and First Aid emergencies.  Students learn skills necessary to give immediate first aid and CPR or breathing until more advanced medical personnel arrive and take over. We look at environmental conditions, mechanics and classification of injury, bloodborne pathogens and taking action. Along with the anatomy of injuries and preventive measures, students also learn how to take blood pressure, pulses and respiration. Along with learning the anatomy and immediate care of injuries and emergency situations of different sections of the body, we discuss shoulder, knee, elbow etc.  The course considers equipment that could be applied to help reduce injuries along with devices to assist in caring for an individual, such as spine board and air splints.  We conclude with concussion assessment. This is a hands-on class where you will be palpating your own and your partner's body.

  •      SE4001

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Physical Activity & Wellness
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One elective credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week

    SE4001 Emergency. Care

    This course prepares students to recognize and respond appropriately to cardiac, breathing, and First Aid emergencies.  Students learn skills necessary to give immediate first aid and CPR or breathing until more advanced medical personnel arrive and take over. We look at environmental conditions, mechanics and classification of injury, bloodborne pathogens and taking action. Along with the anatomy of injuries and preventive measures, students also learn how to take blood pressure, pulses and respiration. Along with learning the anatomy and immediate care of injuries and emergency situations of different sections of the body, we discuss shoulder, knee, elbow etc.  The course considers equipment that could be applied to help reduce injuries along with devices to assist in caring for an individual, such as spine board and air splints.  We conclude with concussion assessment. This is a hands-on class where you will be palpating your own and your partner's body.

  •      SP3051

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week and a lab

    SP3051 Journeys into Spanish I

    Students embark on a journey of linguistic and cultural exploration as they take the first steps towards becoming proficient in Spanish. This course is for students who have not studied Spanish before or who have appropriate NCSSM placement. Students learn to negotiate meaning among individuals, interpret written and spoken meaning, and to present meaning via oral and written messages that focus on the themes of self, family, friends, and everyday activities in the present tense. Students will be able to greet people in Spanish, identify themselves, talk about classes and school life, discuss everyday activities, talk about family and friends, talk about pastimes,and make plans and invitations. Cultural aspects of the Spanish-speaking world are interwoven throughout the course. Web-based exercises, videos, and songs aid students in their acquisition of grammatical concepts, new vocabulary, and listening skills.

  •      SP3052

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Prerequisite(s): SP3051
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week

    SP3052 Journeys in Spanish II

    Students embark on a journey of linguistic and cultural exploration as they take the first steps towards becoming proficient in Spanish. This course is for students who have completed Journeys I or who have appropriate NCSSM placement. Students learn to negotiate meaning among individuals, interpret written and spoken meaning, and to present meaning via oral and written messages that focus on the themes of self, family, friends, and everyday activities in the present tense. Students also learn to address the same themes within an introduction to the past tense and begin to develop the ability to tell a story in the past. Students will be able to discuss and plan a vacation, talk about how they feel, talk about and describe clothing, express preferences in a store, negotiate and pay for items they buy, describe their daily routine and personal hygiene, and talk about and describe food and order food in a restaurant. Cultural aspects of the Spanish-speaking world are interwoven throughout the course. Web-based exercises, videos, and songs aid students in their acquisition of grammatical concepts, new vocabulary, and listening skills.

  •      SP3250

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week

    SP3250 Breakthroughs in Spanish

    Students will enrich their Spanish language knowledge through readings and interpretations of authentic texts in the target language. This course is for students with previous experience in the language and appropriate NCSSM placement. Over the course of the semester, students will reinforce grammar and vocabulary knowledge as well as deepen cultural knowledge of the Spanish-speaking world. By the end of the course, students will be able to decode level appropriate Spanish, read with sufficient accuracy and level appropriate fluency, find and interpret key ideas and details, and make inferences in the target language. Authentic texts, videos, and listening comprehension from the target language are the main modes of instruction. This course not only reviews material from the Journeys series, but stresses emphasis on applied language skills such as reading and speaking. By the end of the course, students will be able to have level-appropriate conversations and will have improved their writing skills in Spanish.

  •      SP3651

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Prerequisite(s): SP3052 or permission of the Dean of Humanities
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week

    SP3651 Navigating in Spanish I

    Students continue to navigate their linguistic and cultural journeys in Spanish. Students begin to read short stories and narratives and to comprehend a wider array of media produced in Spanish. Students also begin to develop understanding of nuances of the language. Students learn to negotiate meaning among individuals, interpret written and spoken meaning, and to present meaning via oral and written messages, primarily in the past tense. Students further develop their proficiency in the language by reading short texts, viewing video programs, and using the language in everyday conversational situations. Students will be able to express congratulations and gratitude and to talk about a variety of topics—including health and medical conditions and technology and electronics. Students continue to explore cultural aspects of the Spanish-speaking world. Students have access to web-based exercises and tutorials, video activities, individual and group projects, as well as film and documentaries, to aid them in the acquisition of grammatical concepts and new vocabulary.

  •      SP3652

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Prerequisite(s): SP3250, SP3651, or permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week

    SP3652 Navigating in Spanish II

    Students continue to navigate their linguistic and cultural journeys in Spanish. Students continue to read short stories and narratives and to comprehend a wider array of media produced in Spanish. Students also continue develop understanding of nuances of the language. Students learn to negotiate meaning among individuals, interpret written and spoken meaning, and to present meaning via oral and written messages, primarily in the past tense. Students will also begin to be able to express their wishes, wants, and desires by using the subjunctive mood. Students further develop their proficiency in the language by reading short texts, viewing video programs, and using the language in everyday conversational situations. Students will be able to describe their home or apartment, talk about household chores, give instructions, discuss environmental issues, express beliefs and opinions, give advice to others, and discuss daily errands and city life. Students continue to explore cultural aspects of the Spanish-speaking world. Students have access to web-based exercises and tutorials, video activities, individual and group projects, as well as film and documentaries, to aid them in the acquisition of grammatical concepts and new vocabulary.

  •      SP3850

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Prerequisite(s): Navigating Spanish I
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week

    SP3850 Explorations in Spanish with Topics

    Explorations in Spanish is an intermediate course for students who want to improve practical Spanish language skills while communicating about climate change. Through interviews, case studies, projects and authentic materials in Spanish, students will describe the effects of climate change on Spanish-speaking regions and be able to explain those effects from the perspective of various Spanish-speaking communities. Students will use Spanish to discuss course topics in class as well as to research and present class projects.

  •      SP4250

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Dean of Humanities based upon demonstrated Spanish-language proficiency acquired outside of typical Spanish courses (e.g., the student grew up in a Spanish-speaking home or completed a K-10 immersion program).
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week and a lab

    SP4250 Spanish for Heritage Speakers

    Are you one of the more than 41 million people in the US who speak Spanish at home? Growing up speaking Spanish in the US is not like speaking it anywhere else! This course provides an opportunity to use your Spanish in an academic setting. Students will build on their existing language proficiency while reading, listening, writing, and speaking about history, linguistics, literature, and contemporary culture in the Spanish-speaking world. Topics may include: origins and evolution of Spanish, accents, dialects and regional varieties of Spanish spoken in more than 22 countries,  language justice, education, art, film, television, podcasts, literature, music, sports, and social media.

  •      SP4251

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Prerequisite(s): By placement or permission
    Corequisite(s): none
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week and a lab

    SP4251 Topics in Advanced Spanish: Gender and Sexuality in the Spanish-Speaking World

    In this advanced level Spanish course, students' exploration into the language expands to encompass elements that reflect the breadth and depth of the Spanish-speaking world and its cultures. Classroom activities emphasize communication and interaction as students use Spanish to discuss, research, and present on topics derived from the course’s unique area of content focus. Whenever the course is offered, that focus varies and is announced when course offerings are published.

    Fall 2022: 
    Gender and Sexuality in the Spanish-Speaking World
    Gender and sexuality are two significant identifiers that both define our experiences in the world and are culturally contextualized. This semester, we will explore different conceptualizations, dynamics, celebrations, and tensions of gender and sexuality in the Spanish-speaking world. We will use podcasts, film, short stories, poetry, music, videos, and a novel to explore topics such as queer identities, family structures, romantic relationships, friendships, intersectionality, beauty standards, non-binary language, and more. Class time will be devoted to discussion-based activities that will deepen our understanding of issues, strengthen vocabulary, and build confidence with the Spanish language.

  •      SP4252

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Prerequisite(s): SP3652, SP3850, SP3900, or permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Three periods per week and a lab

    SP4252 Topics in Advanced Spanish: The Gothic and Supernatural in the Spanish-Speaking World

    The gothic and supernatural often provide a window into a society's fears. With this in mind, we will study fiction, poetry, film, and visual art from the Spanish-speaking world that feature creatures and worlds beyond our own reality in order to understand the cultures and histories that have produced them. The course will be organized thematically with units on the Southern Cone, the Andes, Mexico, and Spain. Through textual analysis and classes dedicated to developing grammar and vocabulary, students will improve their language skills while exploring innovative media.

  •      SP4253

    School: NCSSM Morganton
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Prerequisite(s): SP3652, SP3850, SP3900, or permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Graduation Requirements Met: One World Language credit
    Schedule Requirements Met: One of five courses required each semester
    Meeting Times: Four periods per week

    SP4253 Topics in Advanced Spanish III

    In this advanced level Spanish course, students' exploration into the language expands to encompass elements that reflect the breadth and depth of the Spanish-speaking world and its cultures. Classroom activities emphasize communication and interaction as students use Spanish to discuss, research, and present on topics derived from the course’s unique area of content focus. Whenever the course is offered, that focus varies and is announced when course offerings are published.

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  • AB3051 Journeys into Arabic I
  • AB3051x Journeys into Arabic I
  • AB3052 Journeys into Arabic II
  • AB3651 Navigating in Arabic I
  • AB3652 Navigating in Arabic II
  • AR4100 Drawing
  • AR4120 Ceramics
  • AR4130 Sculpture and 3D Design
  • AR4210 Open Studio
  • AR4310 Digital Photography
  • AR4520 Advanced Studio Art
  • AS4051 American Studies I
  • AS4052 American Studies II
  • BI3580 Classical Genetics (*M*)
  • BI3900 Reseach Experience in Biology
  • BI4010 Anatomy & Physiology
  • BI4020 Ecology (*R*)
  • BI4030 Environmental Science (*R*)
  • BI4130 Aquatic Ecology
  • BI4140 Molecular & Cellular Biol
  • BI4160 Neuroscience (*R*)
  • BI4210 AP Biology (I) (*R*)
  • BI4211 AP Biology (II) (*R*)
  • BI4920 Research in Biology I (*R*)
  • BI4921 Research in Biology II (*R*)
  • BI4922 Research in Biology III (*R*)
  • CH3500 Chemistry Core - Atoms & Molecules
  • CH3900 Research Experience in Chemistry (*R*)
  • CH4000 Chemistry Core - Reactions & Energy
  • CH4020 AP Chemistry (I): Atoms & Molecules (*M*)
  • CH4120 AP Chemistry (II): Kinetics & Energy
  • CH4130 Organic Chemistry
  • CH4140 Environmental Chem (*R*)
  • CH4920 Research Chem I (*R*)
  • CN3051 Journeys into Chinese I
  • CN3052 Journeys into Chinese II
  • CN3651 Navigating in Chinese + Global Understanding I
  • CN3652 Navigating in Chinese + Global Understanding II
  • CN4250 Explorations in Chinese for Heritage Speakers
  • CN4652 Readings in Chinese with Topics
  • CS4120 Computing for Everyone
  • CS4230 Networks and the Web
  • CS4250 Data Visualization
  • CS4270 Fundamentals of Object-Oriented Design
  • CS4300 Topics in Computer Science: Robotics Design for Competition
  • CS4320 Machine Learning
  • CS4330 Server-Side Development
  • CS4350 Data Structures and Algorithms
  • CS4920 Advanced Computer Science Topics
  • DR4101 Theater Performance Workshop
  • DR4102 Theater Performance Workshop
  • EE3100 CAD/CAM
  • EE4000 Mechanical Engineering
  • EE4020 Electrical Engineering
  • EE4080 Biomedical Engineering
  • EE4100 Introductory Robotics
  • EE4160 Civil Engineering
  • EE4180 Environmental Engineering
  • EE4200 Digital Agriculture and Engineering
  • EE4300 Topics In Engineering - Robotics Design
  • EN4300 Creative Writing
  • EN4425 Greek Drama and Performance
  • EN4430 Modern World Fiction
  • EN4440 AI in Science Fiction
  • EN4481 Topics in Literature I
  • EN4482 Topics in Literature II
  • EN4600 Research Experience in the Humanities
  • EN4610 Research in the Humanities
  • FR3651 Navigating in French I
  • FR3652 Navigating in French II
  • FR4051 Advanced French for Global Applications I
  • FR4652 Modern French Readings and Media
  • HU4400 Black Studies
  • HU4405 American Indian and Indigenous Studies
  • HU4420 Digital Humanities
  • HU4435 Bioethics
  • HU4440 Film Studies
  • HU4460 Topics in Humanities I
  • HU4461 Topics in Humanities II
  • HU4462 Topics in Humanities III
  • HU4470 Topics in the Study of Religion: The Pursuit of Meaning
  • HU4490 Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
  • MA1000 Precalculus Corequisite
  • MA1030 Calculus Corequisite
  • MA1044 Calculus II Exam Prep
  • MA4000 Precalculus & Modeling w/ Advanced Topics I
  • MA4002 Precalculus & Modeling w/ Advanced Topics II
  • MA4030 AP Calculus BC w/ Advanced Topics I
  • MA4032 AP Calculus BC w/ Advanced Topics II
  • MA4042 Calculus I
  • MA4044 Calculus II w/AP Prep
  • MA4046 Calculus II
  • MA4050 Modeling with Differential Equations
  • MA4060 Multivariable Calculus
  • MA4110 Foundations of Data Science
  • MA4250 History of Mathematics
  • MA4260 Introduction to Operations Research
  • MA4320 Linear Algebra with Applications
  • MA4330 Non-Euclidean Geometry
  • MA4340 Topics in Mathematics
  • MA4500 Graph Theory with REX Math
  • MA4510 Research in Mathematics
  • MA4512 Research in Mathematics II
  • MR3080 Mentorship: Foundations in Research
  • MR4050a Mentorship: Senior Research I
  • MR4051 Mentorship: Senior Research II
  • MU3500 Classical Piano and Guitar
  • MU4100 Chorale
  • MU4120 Jazz Performance Workshop
  • MU4140 Topics in Music Performance I: Steel Drums and Percussion Ensemble
  • MU4150 Topics in Music Performance II: Solo Repertoire and Performance (Woodwind, Brass, Strings, Pe
  • MU4160 Music Performance Ensemble
  • MU4170 Topics in Music Performance III: Solo Repertoire and Performance (Vocal)
  • MU4300 Music Theory and Composition
  • MU4310 AP Music Theory
  • PA1008 Self Defense
  • PA1009 Hiking
  • PA1020 Fit for Life
  • PH3040 Astronomy
  • PH3500 Physics Core: Mechanics
  • PH3920 Waves Sound, and Optics
  • PH4000 Physics Core: E&M
  • PH4020 Physics Core: Mechanics (Math Intensive) (*M*)
  • PH4120 Physics Core: E&M (Math Intensive) (*M*)
  • PH4130 Computational Physics
  • PH4180 Astrophysics (*R*)
  • PH4240 AP Physics C: Mechanics
  • PH4241 AP Physics C: E&M
  • PH4920 Research in Physics I (*R*)
  • PH4921 Research in Physics II (*R*)
  • PH4922 Research in Physics III (*R*)
  • RE1002 Cornerstone
  • RE1010 Exploring MultiCultural Amer
  • RE1012 Public Speaking
  • RE1016 Marketing You
  • RE1018 Excellence in Leadership
  • RE1020 Financial Planning
  • RE1022 College and Career
  • SE4001 Emergency. Care
  • SE4001 Emergency. Care
  • SP3051 Journeys into Spanish I
  • SP3052 Journeys in Spanish II
  • SP3250 Breakthroughs in Spanish
  • SP3651 Navigating in Spanish I
  • SP3652 Navigating in Spanish II
  • SP3850 Explorations in Spanish with Topics
  • SP4250 Spanish for Heritage Speakers
  • SP4251 Topics in Advanced Spanish: Gender and Sexuality in the Spanish-Speaking World
  • SP4252 Topics in Advanced Spanish: The Gothic and Supernatural in the Spanish-Speaking World
  • SP4253 Topics in Advanced Spanish III
  • ----------------------- end of results -----------------------

NCSSM Morganton
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